Letters to the Editor

Letter: Vote Jankovsky for business and jobs

October 25, 2014 — 

Tom Jankovsky’s opponent is running on the same old agenda of dehumanizing the local energy business at the expense of the actual employees. My family and I work in the energy industry but also care deeply about the area in which we live.

I am proud to support Tom Jankovsky. As an energy worker, community supporter and steward of the environment, my family and the thousands of other employees in the energy business understand our jobs are only as secure as the thoughtful leaders who allow us to responsibly development our energy resources.

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Letter: Convention of states needed

October 25, 2014 — 

Our U.S. Constitution, the ultimate legal restriction on all three branches of government, designed for the purpose of protecting the unalienable liberties defined in the Declaration of Independence, has been increasingly decimated since the days of Theodore Roosevelt.

Congress has become a dynastic ruling class that recognizes no limits on their authority to regulate, tax or spend, often forcing the states to relinquish their constitutional rights. The executive branch is illegally issuing endless overreaching executive orders, is unwilling to secure our borders, refuses serious counter terrorism and discourages domestic energy. The Supreme Court has repeatedly misinterpreted the original intent of the Constitution.

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Letter: Thanks, Sen. Udall, for insurance mess

October 24, 2014 — 

I would like to thank Sen. Udall for having my family’s health insurance canceled. I received my cancellation letter a couple of weeks ago. I called up my insurance agent and he confirmed that as of the end of the year my policy will be canceled. Even better, I cannot even start to find replacement insurance until the middle of next month. Legally, no companies can offer my family a new policy.

There are millions of others who received the same letter. Enough of the career politicians. He has been one his whole career as are his two cousins who are also U.S. senators. Please vote for anybody else.

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Letter: Code versus tradition in Carbondale

October 24, 2014 — 

At a recent Carbondale council meeting I, and maybe several council members, learned that when it comes to code enforcement, sometimes there seems to be a split between code versus tradition.

I brought up an issue I had with the usage of public right of way. The town has a code on this that says vehicles can’t be left more than 72 hours on public right of way. Our neighbor had a very large RV completely on the right of way for a month with a person living in it. Unfortunately when we tried to talk to her, she wasn’t receptive to find a potential solution.

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Letter: Dodging Carbondale’s orange cones

October 23, 2014 — 

I love Carbondale’s new sport, “Orange Cone Dodge.”

Seriously, a big thank you to the planners and workers making massive improvements to Highway 133 in such a timely manner. No easy task juggling our daily traffic around huge machinery. It is starting to look really good and will be worth all the “dodging” when it is done.

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Letter: Don’t believe the deficit figures

October 23, 2014 — 

It is always problematic to talk of federal spending using figures supplied by politicians. The official federal debt as of Sept. 30 was $17,824,071,380,733.82 (from the Treasury’s “debt to the penny”). A year before, it was $16,738,183,526,697.32, for a difference of $1,085,887,854,036.50. How the politicians get from $1.085 trillion to a $486 billion deficit you cited is the question.

James Dale Davidson writes that using GAAP-based figures (generally accepted accounting principles, to which every legitimate business and public company must adhere), the deficit hit about $6.2 trillion for 2013 alone.

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Letter: Veggies are good; processed foods aren’t

October 23, 2014 — 

In his article this week praising the health benefits of meat and dissing tofu, Steve Wells did a disservice to his readers who, despite his disclaimer, see Steve as an expert in nutrition.

All experts I have heard or read agree that eating lots of vegetables and some fruits is the healthiest thing you can do, in regard to prevention of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, elevated cholesterol, heart attacks and strokes, and many forms of cancer. However, they also agree that processed food of any kind, including plants, is bad for you. So unadulterated tofu is good for you, but if processed, as it often is in the U.S., it has the same problems as any other processed food.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Views on candidates and ballot issues

October 22, 2014 — 

Surveyor should be a nonpartisan

office

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Letter: Winter’s coming; that’s what matters

October 22, 2014 — 

With irrational exuberance and a sense of guileless immortality, the fall colors are once again tumbling downvalley like a tie-dyed rabble of late ‘60s festival-goers. A few are quite subtle and more are sublime, but all are more likely to burn out than fade away.

As seen from our town’s noble recycling center along School Street, the thirsty willows are taking on a burnished luster, shifting from green to gold then finally to a leafless burnt orange. The pungent sage is shimmering and flickering toward a silvery flameout.

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Letter: Why not add a siren on the hill?

October 22, 2014 — 

What sort of idiots approved or will approve Steve Beckley’s three and a half miles of Christmas lights above Glenwood Springs at the Glenwood Adventure Park? Someone has forgotten the magnificence of these high-altitude skies or is willing to trade them for a few more dollars in their dank wallets?

Why would anyone want to see this lighted mess on top of the skyline coming into Glenwood any night of the year? You can bet they will run this silly expenditure of power any time it’s dark next year and all the years after and petition for longer summer hours as well. The roller coaster’s roar and the screams scare the game off the heights already — you can hear this way too well all the way up the trails. Now lights? Why not a siren?

I find what has been done above and around the splendid Fairy Cave since its opening so offensive as to stretch my imagination and mash my indignation button. Its just embarrassing. Cheap Trick is a better name for the place.

Dear Lord don’t bring it down to Iron Springs.

What’s next up there?

Letter: Many consumers like to read labels

October 22, 2014 — 

To buy or not to buy, that is the question. This GMO food labeling issue seems just like MSG, peanuts, high fructose corn syrup, etc., etc.. Many consumers like to read food labels before they choose to put the item in their cart, or not. I am voting yes for GMO labeling because I simply want information to help me choose.

Letter: Vote ‘yes’ to support GMO Proposition 105

October 22, 2014 — 

My husband and I are farmers in the Fruita area. We support the GMO Proposition 105 and will be voting YES to have products labeled. We understand the importance of quality food. Don’t be fooled by the agriculture’s big business greed for profit and the government’s lack of concern for the health of its citizens. GMOs have no place in our food chain either as feed for livestock or food for humans.

Holly & Mark Cremeens

Fruita, Colo.

Letter: Jankovsky respected for business and leadership skills

October 21, 2014 — 

I have known Tom Jankovsky for over 25 years and respect him for his business and leadership skills. Over the last three and one half years, Tom has demonstrated, time and again, these attributes as our County Commissioner.

 Garfield County has an annual budget in excess of $120 million, and currently employs almost 500 individuals. These two facts alone, dictate the need for someone with proven business experience and in-depth knowledge of both the budget and financial review processes.

 It would be a mistake to entrust this responsibility to someone that lacks the necessary experience and management skills this position requires.

 Please join me in supporting the re-election of Tom Jankovsky for Garfield County Commissioner.

Letter: Elks seek hides to help veterans

October 21, 2014 — 

Well it’s that time of year again when Elks around the country ask hunters to donate the hides of animals they harvest during hunting season. The hides we collect are sent to tanneries to have them turned into leather, and after that they are made into gloves (fingerless and full-finger) for disabled vets who need them to protect their hands due to having to use wheelchairs or crutches. Some of the leather is also used for craft kits that are used for occupational and recreational therapy. Many fine pieces of arts and crafts have come from these kits.

The best part of this program; this is given to the vets free of charge. All costs, after the Elks receive the hides, are borne by the Elks Association. This is something not budgeted by the Veterans Administration and therefore would not be available if not for this amazing program.

So if you are a hunter, or know a hunter, we would appreciate the donation of any animal hides collected during hunting season. Last year the Colorado Elks Association collected over 1,000 hides. Locally, we collected over 100. I think we can beat that this year, so help me get the word out. If you have any questions, need more information or want to help collect and salt the hides please contact me at (970) 948-9127 or at team-regan@hotmail.com.

Thank you for your past and continued support of this important program.

Letter: Dupuy should feel embarrassed

October 21, 2014 — 

This letter is directed to Tina Dupuy, author of the column titled: ”On the Internet there’s no such thing as a true science denier,” on Sept. 26.

Ms. Dupuy describes science as rigorous and unemotional but the later misleads her readers with regard to climate change by skipping key portions of the scientific method, applying her own bias and taunting those who don’t agree with the conclusion. Ms. Dupuy presents no hypothesis and then claims there is no controversy surrounding the topic the reader must infer. Using the words she closes the column with, she is the one who should feel embarrassed.

Using the context she provided, I assume Ms. Dupuy’s hypothesis is that Earth is warming unnaturally (be it man caused or otherwise). Rather than emphasize that we cannot test many of the theories behind global warming, I prefer to indicate that we do not have the data she refers to on the topic. There is no controversy about the fact that climate varies from year to year, and that it’s completely normal.

Application of statistics could tell us if the temperature of any given year was abnormal if we had enough data. The Earth as been warming and cooling for billions of years and we have just over 100 years of yearly data from which to draw conclusions. The data we do have (sampled at a much lower rate) has shown that there can be periods of warming and cooling spanning tens of thousands of years. What does one hot summer or 10 hot summers tell us with regard to the “average” global temperature? Virtually nothing.

The column presents no hypothesis, no evidence of data showing accurate prediction of the Earth’s temperature nor test data showing proof of her missing hypothesis. Denying the Earth warmed to end the ice age with natural causes must create internal controversy for Ms. Dupuy. Is it a problem that we had a warm August? Nu-huh! Enjoy the warm weather, we need a few more thousand years of it before we can draw any meaningful conclusions.

Letter: Recreation and tourism fall short

October 21, 2014 — 

I read about Tom Jankovsky’s challenger in the Post Independent. How is it some people think recreation and tourism can come anywhere near the revenue generator the oil and gas industry brings to our community? Do they not understand numbers? If anyone has doubt, I encourage them to ask our Garfield County Assessor’s Office for a tax revenue report.

Re-elect Tom J. for Garfield County commissioner.

Letter: Officer was holding gun properly

October 21, 2014 — 

This is in response to the letter from Ed Colby regarding how the police officer was holding the gun that was shown in the picture on the front page of the Post Independent.

Obviously, Mr. Colby has not taken a gun safety course, as he would have known the officer was holding the gun in the proper manner that is the most safe in any situation.

Also, I am so proud that our sheriff, police, first responders and hospitals are taking the time and effort to prepare themselves and our children for a life-threatening emergency.

I would ask why anyone would criticize our public officers and medical personnel who go through these extra rigorous hours of training in order to be prepared to protect our children and teachers, or anyone for that matter, in the way an officer holds a gun or whether it is loaded.

I think someone might be missing the bigger picture here.

Michelle Ballinger

Glenwood Springs

Letter: Why did I pay so much for gas?

October 21, 2014 — 

Headline Oct. 14 in the Grand Junction newspaper: “Gas prices dip below $3.”

Huh, I would swear I just filled up at New Castle and paid $3.34 9/10. Couldn’t be, because that would imply we are back into the Good Old Days of being abused by our local fuel industry. And they assured us they would never do that.

Maybe my memory is getting spotty — and maybe the gasoline barons are just hoping my memory is getting spotty.

Jim Ellis

New Castle

Letter: Seeking other bridge opponents

October 21, 2014 — 

In the Tuesday, Oct. 7, issue of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent, you printed a letter to the editor from Dale Reed saying that he, “among many others,” would like to have signed the letter on the Highway 82-Glenwood Springs bypass signed by 12 people.

If, indeed, there are many others who would like to have signed that letter, please let us know who you are and how we may contact you. You may write, email or call me, as follows: Jim Breasted, 678 Sopris Ave., Carbondale, CO 81623, 970-963-4190, jamesbreasted@Q.com.

James Breasted

Carbondale

Your opinions as Election Day nears

October 20, 2014 — 

Sullivan would represent District 1

There is a clear choice for Garfield County commissioner this year. Michael Sullivan brings with him not only several years on the County Planning Commission, participation in the writing of the Comprehensive Plan and a solid plan for economic growth (that is compatible with Rep. Rankin’s focus on attracting tech companies to Garfield County), but he brings a different and important perspective to the commission.

District 1 (Roaring Fork Valley) has been underserved over the past four years. During the debate in Glenwood Springs on Oct. 14, Tom focused entirely on Western Garfield County. In fact, he referred to the Thompson Divide as “an area south of I-70 with 65 active leases” never referring to that area as the Thompson Divide. What does that indicate?

Tom ignored the wishes of his constituents in District 1 and supported a waste transfer station located next to homes outside of Carbondale and ignored the wishes of Four Mile Road landowners on recent road construction insisting that a 30-year-old evaluation of County Road 117 was pertinent to today.

Besides not representing his home district, Tom Jankovsky has negatively influenced changes to the land-use code. Besides relaxing all general development requirements, all local oil and gas regulations have been stripped from the code. As a former Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation commissioner, I will tell you that the COGCC does not regulate land use as it relates to oil and gas development. Tom Jankovsky made the argument in the debate that the COGCC handles all regulation as it pertains to development. This is simply not the reality in Colorado. The COGCC has the authority, resources and expertise to regulate the technical side of energy development and the counties have the authority, resources and expertise to regulate the land-use issues. In fact, the COGCC (pursuant to state rules) relies on the county commissions to represent their constituents on land-use issues in active applications. Landowners in Garfield County currently have no representation on oil and gas issues. Let’s change this.

Please join me in supporting Michael Sullivan for District 1 county commissioner.

Trési Houpt

Glenwood Springs

Quest for alternative energy and your yes vote

The purpose of this letter is to ask for the voters’ support of the Silt Water Conservancy District (SWCD) and a “Yes” vote on Ballot Issue 5A. The SWCD operates and maintains Harvey Gap and Rifle Gap reservoirs and delivers water from those reservoirs to farmers and ranchers in the district.

Both reservoirs lend themselves to the utilization of their hydro energy for the production of electrical power. The resulting electricity could be sold and the money used to offset irrigator assessments and taxes currently burdening the district citizens. The SWCD, in seeking to provide an alternative energy supply along with the accompanying revenue source, found itself stymied by TABOR restrictions.

To fund the hydroelectric projects, SWCD would seek grants so as not to burden the district citizens further. But TABOR restrictions have the result of ruling out grants. You see, receiving a grant would result in a significant increase in annual income to the district. TABOR restrictions allow only 10 percent income increases. So now you can see that the SWCD feels stymied and in a dilemma, and as a result has proposed Ballot Issue 5A to correct the situation.

On your ballot, you will find in the text of Issue 5A, the following words “...authorized...to collect, retain, and expend the full revenues derived from any and all lawful revenue source...”

Your “Yes” vote on the ballot issue, along with 50 percent (or more) of the other district voters, will allow the SWCD to proceed with seeking grant money for alternative energy projects. The passing of Ballot Issue 5A will not increase property taxes or sales taxes.

Dick Rhoades

Rifle

Economic domination by corporations

Republican Cory Gardner is a textbook example: In 1936, Sinclair Lewis warned us they would come, draped in the flag and carrying a cross. Ready to enforce their morality, religion and top-heavy economics on our country. They are here in force. This group is totally homegrown. Born in the creation of a banking monster, fed by the stolen money and labor of the common people to enrich the few and allow them total control of the government. Never before have we seen the negotiations to buy a county so visible. The best deal for the wealthy that money can buy.

I do want address and dismiss the religion part, just as the economic lords of America do. Americans have a hard time distinguishing between religion and patriotism. Most think it’s essentially the same, all rolled into God and country. It definitely isn’t so. As the founding fathers well knew, these two powerful ideas are best nurtured individually. If they are “successfully” combined, as it appears is being attempted in America today, you will eventually create something that looks like a Muslim country under Sharia law with an economic disaster thrown in. Which is why I have stated that the religious component (and the alleged patriotism) in this attempted coup is, in fact, fraudulent and irrelevant to the actual goal, which is simple economic domination by the corporations and their wealthy owners. As all despots know, the people’s interest in religion is but a tool for politicians. You see it well wielded in the current political climate.

Another clue worth noting is the open use of fraud, fear mongering and misdirection. The Koch money sponsored fraudulent voter registrations mailed to minority voters in the East and the bizarre ads everywhere, somehow trying to pin Ebola and the responsibility for the ISIS attacks on Democratic candidates. They really do think you are dumb enough to swallow this junk.

You can easily have two more years of dysfunctional government, idiocy and chaos; simply vote Republican.

R.W. Boyle

New Castle

Revulsed by Hickenlooper endorsement

The first headline that grabbed my attention this Sunday morning, Oct. 19, was that of a PI editorial endorsing Gov. John Hickenlooper: “Our View: Hickenlooper is leading us in right direction.”

My vomit reflex struck as lightning, though not literally but figuratively. I was totally and thoroughly revulsed. I said to myself, “To this is what our local paper has descended. To be run by traitors to the founding principles of this country.” Hickenlooper as well as his traitor-in-arms (no pun intended), Sen. Mark Udall, have done their best to eviscerate our Second Amendment rights.

Now this brazen revelation from what now, except for the otherwise honorable impulses that appear on its pages, rightfully deserves the designation of “hometown rag.” Shame is thy name.

Steve Campbell

Glenwood Springs

Don’t yield to scare tactics on 105

The power of no and the power of fear are amazing. I received a mailing from opponents of Proposition 105, which would require the labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in our food. Their outrageous scare tactics claim it would cost millions of dollars and that the proposition is poorly written. In fact, it will cost each Coloradoan 2 cents per year to fund this measure — a measly total of $124,000. Their example of the “poorly” written measure is that animals raised on GMO food won’t have to be labeled as GMOs. They fail to mention that these animals are not genetically modified.

We’d be better off listening to a debate between candidates or reading their beliefs, rather than being bombarded with erroneous literature full of scare tactics and “no.” Reading an overview of proposals is more accurate than scare brochures or commercials. We need to pay attention to who benefits from all this negativity and fear-mongering. Maybe we wouldn’t be quite so negative about our government if we could hear a candidate’s beliefs and goals rather than half-truths and fears from the opposition.

Instead of reading scare tactics, look at who publishes it. The opponents of Proposition 105 are mostly farmers and agribusiness who grow GMOs, along with those they’ve convinced through propaganda. The proponents are citizens worried about their food supply.

Finally, we need to vote. I’m tired of hearing how bad things are from people who won’t make the effort to inform themselves and vote.

Peter Westcott

Carbondale

Jankovsky: A steadfast advocate for growth

As a Garfield County commissioner, Tom Jankovsky has helped steer the county’s economy in a positive direction despite the national economic recession. While it’s currently on the upswing, there is still much work to be done to ensure a long-term, healthy, thriving economic climate. As a leader with a proven record of action, I encourage voters to re-elect Tom J. for a second term.

During his tenure, Tom has been a steadfast advocate for economic growth from Parachute to Carbondale. He streamlined the county’s land use code, making it more relevant, accessible and business-friendly. As a direct result, the developers of Ironbridge Golf Community in Glenwood Springs were able to move forward on projects that have reinvigorated the once-stagnating property.

Under Tom’s leadership, municipal infrastructure projects have created jobs countywide. Through the Gas and Oil Mitigation Fund, each town received $1 million in funds for projects like the roundabout in Carbondale, Seventh Street in Glenwood Springs, a pedestrian bridge in New Castle, improvements to Main Street in Silt, and new interchanges in Rifle and Parachute.

But there’s still more work to be done — work that includes advocating for Garfield County at state and national levels. Upcoming issues include how federal land will be used in the future and how state sales tax funds can and should help support vital county services like emergency communications and the library district. Tom is not only qualified, he understands that the decisions made today will affect the citizens of Garfield County and their families for decades to come.

Keep Garfield County moving in a positive direction, vote to re-elect Tom Jankovsky.

Jill Bullock

Glenwood Springs

The right to choose what I feed my family

My family and I search for, choose and plant seeds labeled as non-GMO in our garden. We expect the same labeling for foods we purchase at a food store. If we do not know whether we are eating genetically modified organisms we may inadvertently be exposing ourselves to allergic responses, and experience other adverse health effects.

As a citizen and a consumer I want the right to choose what I feed my family.

Sara Colburn

Grand Junction

Free Press Letter: Water & energy intimately tied

October 20, 2014 — 

Many of us feel that water issues, especially in a bio region such as Mesa County, are intimately tied to energy-use conservation, and cooperation among ourselves in a stigmergic fashion.

Oil extraction has hit its peak, and corporate think tanks know natural gas fracking produces carcinogens and issues with aquifers. Revitalization of an aquifer that is damaged takes a long time, and it includes care for other species; it is a very, very slow natural process that occurs so that healing can take place.

So carpooling and vehicle entrainment actions are assumed necessities, as is public transportation. What also might be good is more community effort at maintaining our core-area trees and vegetation. The community gardens are great, and are models for self sufficiency.

Definitely pruning could help, and I wish the business of ethanol production from wood chips, yielding good soil building charcoal, was still around.

David Hays

Grand Junction, Colo.

Letter: GMO violation could lead to fine, jail

October 19, 2014 — 

Until I read the fine print in Proposition 105, I was ready to support it, as it sounded like a good idea: to know whether the food I buy has genetically modified organisms in it.

However, according to the analysis published by the Legislative Council of the Colorado General Assembly in the State Ballot Information Booklet, Research Publication NO. 639-7, it appears there is more than a simple decision whether to require labels on food products that contain GMOs at stake.

Under “Penalties for violations”:

“The penalty for a violation is a fine of not more than $1,000, six months imprisonment in a country jail, or both. Subsequent violations are punishable by a fine of up to $2,000, one year in country jail, or both. Proposition 105 prohibits a person from suing a manufacturer, distributor or retailer for not properly labeling foods produced with genetic engineering.”

Unfortunately, such penalties are hardly significant enough to deter big companies who would rather violate the statute should it be passed. Also, it appears it will remove the right of people who are harmed by failure to label foods properly that contain GMOs to seek restitution in our law courts. It appears passage of the Proposition 105 will strip the public of the right to sue for damages resulting from consumption of GMO products, which may be the biggest threat facing those who claim GMOs are harmless and no different from any other food products on the market today.

The way the Proposition 105 is currently worded, its passage would fail to support the government bureaucracy required to monitor and enforce it. We the people would have to absorb the shortfall. The proposition almost appears to have been written by the corporations and organizations who would stand to benefit from its acceptance at the polls. It appears as a gift that will protect consumers, when it actually may leave them unable to seek compensation for damages that recent research indicates GMOs can cause to general health and well-being, both of animals and humans.

For these reasons, it may be better to rely on boycott pressure by the public against GMOs and to continue to support third-party organizations that certify food products that do not contain GMOs such as the “Non-GMO Project” (nongmoproject.org).

Fred Pulver

Carbondale

Letter: Road investments help region

October 18, 2014 — 

In the midst of highway construction season, frustrated area travelers have much to be thankful for. As owner of an eclectic fleet of vehicles, it is a mixed blessing to be paying higher Colorado vehicle registration bridge and road safety FASTER surcharges (Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery). With these higher fees there has been investment in area infrastructure, jobs and businesses. Many have benefited from projects such as two lane on and off ramps at the I-70 Glenwood Springs interchange. Imagine the congestion if there were still one lane for westbound I-70 travelers starting on the Grand Avenue bridge. Hopefully with foresight, continued shared funding and completion of other FASTER projects such as SH 133 improvements in Carbondale, our patience will be duly rewarded.

With the completion of wildlife fencing projects in our area, I extend my appreciation to those involved in these and other beneficial, albeit expensive FASTER projects. Challenges related to such investment include accident reduction, mortality and impacts to herd size and migration patterns. Also important is correlating seasonal speed-reduction zones to accidents, wildlife mortality and tickets issued to whether these zones are truly effective or if future planning, funding and installation of wildlife fencing is a better alternative. There remain areas around Aspen, Basalt and Glenwood Springs lacking needed big-game accident mitigation. Hopefully the possible “offensive aesthetics” opposition and other design challenges can be overcome and these high kill count locations can be funded and constructed. Motorists, hunters, wildlife watchers and big game animals can all benefit.

Finally, thanks on a much smaller scale go to whichever entity was responsible for the creation and installation of the “pedestrian push button is behind you” signs installed in downtown Glenwood Sprigs intersections on SH82/Grand Avenue. For years I have observed many frustrated pedestrians waiting in vain to cross the highway due to not pushing the crossing buttons located in incongruous locations.

With patience, shared funding and the commitment of resources to our region, many projects large and small mark significant investment and continued improvements for travelers, wildlife and many others.

Letter: Time to Replace Jankovsky

October 17, 2014 — 

We desperately need a change in the Board of County Commissioners in Garfield County. The current board, of which Tom Jankovsky is a member, approved a solid waste transfer station on 100 Road outside of Carbondale despite overwhelming opposition at numerous meetings by area residents. Petitions against the facility signed by hundreds of voters, concerns of increased fire danger, ground water contamination, danger of increased truck traffic, etc. were ignored in the decision to approve this use. Improvements in the bridge over the Roaring Fork at a cost of perhaps millions of dollars will be paid for by taxpayers so that this private enterprise can make a profit.

Was it because some of the main supporters of the commissioner’s campaign were principles in the station? Or was it because the commissioners almost always support business over the concerns of their constituents? For whatever reason, if this facility is built, it will be a blight on the rural nature and the recreational use of this neighborhood.

Michael Sullivan is a great choice as a representative of the people and not of the oil and gas business. He is in favor of protecting the Thompson Divide and has the experience in public service to do the job.

Please vote for Michael Sullivan.

Letter: Same old liberal garbage

October 17, 2014 — 

I read with sadness that Gardner and Beauprez are behind in some polls. Coloradans are being so badly fooled. Udall and Hickenlooper both are simply Obama clones, and voting for them will get you the same old liberal garbage.

This country is going down fast, and both congressmen and voters have allowed it to happen. Udall fills the media with fluff about how he is preserving Colorado resources — just a smokescreen to cover his 99 percent voting for everything that has been rammed down our throats — amnesty, gun control, partial-birth abortion, outsourcing jobs, raising taxes, Obamacare, allowing illegals college tuition over American citizens, and enjoying the benefits of being one of the Washington, D.C., elite. Big money is doing the electing and it’s not the Republicans. Look up the funding record of George Soros.

Young people have been brainwashed into thinking that they are getting more freedom with liberal policies — oh, goody, legalized pot, same-sex marriage, reliance on food stamps, etc. Well, in a few years you will find out how fast you have become government slaves.

A few lures and you are hooked. Just like the wild pigs that were gradually led into a pen with a trail of corn and then, the gate slammed shut. The widespread ignorance today in this country is inexcusable. Vote for “same-old” and that’s what you get.

October 17, 2014 — 

Letter: Commissioners subvert laws they dislike

October 16, 2014 — 

We are a nation of laws and our representatives enact laws to govern the people at all levels of government. Regulations are then instituted by elected officials to implement and enforce the laws. In Garfield County, the triad of elected officials on the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) have continually worked to subvert the laws they don’t agree with by doing away with existing regulations and refusing to enact needed new regulations to meet new situations. The BOCC also practices corporate discrimination by exempting certain industries from the laws and regulations, namely, the gas and oil drilling industry, at whose altar they all worship.

A case in point is the new comprehensive development plan, which not only exempts the oil and gas industry but makes the provisions optional, which means that it cannot be enforced. This can only lead to a further deterioration in property values and quality of life in Garfield County.

I feel that the present members on the BOCC are violating their oath of office by failing to implement and enforce all laws that have been passed by the people’s representatives, and therefore none of them should be retained in office, especially Jankowski, who has made it very clear that he is a champion of deregulation.

I urge the voters to abandon the habit of voting only on the basis of who has a “D” or “R” after their name and vote for the candidate who will truly represent their interests. As an Independent voter I believe that Michael Sullivan will best represent my views on the BOCC, and he will get my vote.

Letter: Prop 105 gives consumers a choice

October 16, 2014 — 

I found Congress’ reasoning for not labeling GMOs infuriating. To actually watch a congressman state that he didn’t think the American people were intelligent enough to make decisions on their own food supply is insulting.

Prop 105 does not ban GMOs, it allows consumers the opportunity to make their own decision about what they want to ingest. When GMO labeling was mandated in 64 countries throughout the world, there wasn’t a spike in food prices and the corporations that export to these countries already label their product. If Colorado’s produce was already labeled, that would alleviate the need to do so for exportation.

Hybridization is a practice farmers have used to cross-pollinate specific strains of existing seeds to get the best results for their crops and shouldn’t be confused with genetically modified organisms. GMOs are implanted with DNA from totally different organisms (bacteria, virus, etc.), some of which have been found in those who ingest these products.

Although the FDA deems GMOs safe, some might think that the jury is out on this as the products are constantly evolving. Some might feel that there might be a conflict of interests when Michael Taylor, the deputy commissioner for foods at the FDA was the former VP for public policy at Monsanto, along with others that have worked in both sectors.

Lastly, why is Monsanto and others spending over $8 million dollars just in Colorado to stop this bill that only requires labeling? After watching Agent Orange ravage people I loved after Vietnam, I’m more than dubious when Monsanto claims something is safe.

Letter: What’s the specific bypass question?

October 16, 2014 — 

First, I have to say I don’t live in town or have a business in town and wouldn’t even be able to vote. However, I have been following the bridge/bypass/traffic issue (for decades). I keep earnestly trying to figure out what the smartest thing is to do. I tend to waffle as I read each well thought out and passionate letter.

Initially, I thought the bridge design was a horrible monstrosity, but now I think that once we get used to it, it could be a good thing. Having lived in Southern California decades ago, I remember the huge flyways back there, and to be honest, they were dramatic and beautiful. I never pictured that for Glenwood, but maybe ... At any rate, all this to say I don’t have a “dog in this hunt,” just a genuine desire for a good traffic solution and a love for this special little town.

Something that I couldn’t put my finger on about this issue has always really bothered me. And finally, while reading the paper Monday, about the governor being in Glenwood Springs and Carbondale, something finally gelled for me. Here’s the quote that sparked it: “He (the CDOT director) told the Post Independent later that no route for a bypass has ever been established, and no cost estimate has ever been made, but the project would be expensive and contentious.” Then I “got it.” Here’s what’s bothering me: If there were a vote, what would I be voting on? What’s the question? Wouldn’t we be voting for the concept of less traffic, which is not a workable solution? Wouldn’t getting consensus for the location, to figure out how to word the question, begin more decades of debate? What would the vote be, i.e., the wording? Without specific information, like location, cost, impact, how could one even vote? What’s the specific bypass question?

I still don’t know what side I’m on, other than for Glenwood Springs and for less traffic. What am I missing?

Letter: Road investments help region

October 16, 2014 — 

In the midst of highway construction season, frustrated area travelers have much to be thankful for. As owner of an eclectic fleet of vehicles, it is a mixed blessing to be paying higher Colorado vehicle registration bridge and road safety FASTER surcharges (Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery). With these higher fees there has been investment in area infrastructure, jobs and businesses. Many have benefited from projects such as two lane on and off ramps at the I-70 Glenwood Springs interchange. Imagine the congestion if there were still one lane for westbound I-70 travelers starting on the Grand Avenue bridge. Hopefully with foresight, continued shared funding and completion of other FASTER projects such as SH 133 improvements in Carbondale, our patience will be duly rewarded.

With the completion of wildlife fencing projects in our area, I extend my appreciation to those involved in these and other beneficial, albeit expensive FASTER projects. Challenges related to such investment include accident reduction, mortality and impacts to herd size and migration patterns. Also important is correlating seasonal speed-reduction zones to accidents, wildlife mortality and tickets issued to whether these zones are truly effective or if future planning, funding and installation of wildlife fencing is a better alternative. There remain areas around Aspen, Basalt and Glenwood Springs lacking needed big-game accident mitigation. Hopefully the possible “offensive aesthetics” opposition and other design challenges can be overcome and these high kill count locations can be funded and constructed. Motorists, hunters, wildlife watchers and big game animals can all benefit.

Finally, thanks on a much smaller scale go to whichever entity was responsible for the creation and installation of the “pedestrian push button is behind you” signs installed in downtown Glenwood Springs intersections on SH82/Grand Avenue. For years I have observed many frustrated pedestrians waiting in vain to cross the highway due to not pushing the crossing buttons located in incongruous locations.

With patience, shared funding and the commitment of resources to our region, many projects large and small mark significant investment and continued improvements for travelers, wildlife and many others.

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