Letter: Dangers of Hillary | PostIndependent.com

Letter: Dangers of Hillary

When the law no longer protects you from the corrupt, but protects the corrupt from you … you know your nation is doomed — a quote from Ayn Rand. If you or I did what Hillary Clinton did in regard to national security emails, we would have been arrested and jailed long ago. It’s called a double standard.

Do you know the difference between liberty and tyranny? Liberty is when your government fears you; tyranny is when you fear your government. Take away our Second Amendment rights to own a gun (rifle), and we’re on the fast track to tyranny.

Vote for Hillary and you’ll experience tyranny, Vote for “the Donald” and you’ll experience liberty. It’s as simple as that.

Here are a few thoughts about Hillary you may want to consider before you vote:

Hillary tampered with hundreds of top secret documents. Hillary sent 2,079 classified emails via unsecured server out of “convenience.” Hillary deleted over 30,000 emails.

Comparisons:

David Petraeus, convicted. Scooter Libby, convicted. Edward Snowden, charged. Hillary Clinton. Democratic nominee for president. How does that happen?

What’s the next step, massive voter fraud? Do you trust those electronic voting machines? Has Hillary already won the presidency but “we the people” just haven’t been told yet? Don’t count on the FBI to investigate because at this point, what difference does it make?

James Comey is the FBI director. Do you think he was on the take or in fear of his life when he decided not to prosecute Hillary? What else would explain the reason why Hillary wasn’t indicted?

Hillary is counting on women blindly voting for her. She must think women are brainless morons. I have a hard time understanding why any woman would vote for Hillary just because she’s a she. She has no record of actual accomplishments. She got where she is through fraud, serial lying and her strong attachment to her husband’s coattails. Forget about your feelings. Think of your kids, grandkids and your country before you cast your vote. Do not allow crooked Hillary and her like kind into it.

Stan Rachesky

Glenwood Springs

Letter: Sleazy headline

Enough is enough. I don’t care how many “prizes” this newspaper wins. It is time for your staff to decide whether you are journalists or whether you work for the National Enquirer.

Your sleazy (and I’m being kind here) headline regarding Sean McMillan’s tragic death is not quite in keeping with the award-winning series on suicide you did just over a year ago. Sean McMillan was more than the husband of “embezzler” Robin McMillan. He was someone’s son, someone’s father, someone’s friend.

How sad for his family and friends to open this newspaper and see a person that they loved treated in this manner. How sad for the readers of this newspaper to see how their death might be treated in the local rag if there is any kind of scandal involved. How sad for survivors of suicide to be subjected to this headline. I wish I had a subscription so that I could cancel it.

Lisa Warder

Glenwood Springs

Requests overwhelming agencies — but is it pot that’s bringing more poor to Pueblo?

Is legalized marijuana bringing more poor people to Pueblo County?

For local nonprofit agencies that are the front line in dealing with indigent people, there is no question more poor single people and families have been knocking on their doors in the past few years.

Eva Matola spoons food onto trays for them at the Pueblo Community Soup Kitchen. The men and women — often wearing all the clothes they own — sit against the brick wall of the soup kitchen every weekday, waiting for its doors to open for lunch.

“We’re feeding about 160 people a day, and that’s about 30 more than we were doing last year,” said Matola, who is the director of the soup kitchen. “And I’ve had several families in here saying they’ve come to Pueblo because pot is legal here. They aren’t shy about telling you.”

Anne Stattelman, director of Posada Pueblo, an emergency housing agency, has developed a reputation as a community scold on marijuana over the past two years because she’s been telling Pueblo County and city officials that legal pot is bringing more indigent people to town.

That’s because many of them end up in Posada’s parking lot, asking or demanding some kind of housing for themselves and their families.

Some say they want to find work in the marijuana industry. Some just want to be able to use the drug legally.

An older SUV from Kansas was in Posada’s lot just a few weeks ago. There were three or four children and several adults from Wichita. They told Stattelman they’d left Wichita — where they had assisted housing and food stamps — to come to Pueblo, and they needed a place to stay.

For some time now, Posada has been reserving its small inventory of emergency housing units for Pueblo County residents first, and Stattelman has built a close working relationship with Pueblo police — who told the Kansas family their best bet was to turn around and take the children back to Wichita rather than end up on Pueblo’s streets.

“Fortunately, that’s what they did,” Stattelman said. “Or what they said they’d do.”

Unlike government agencies, Posada’s staff asks people coming to them for help why they are in Pueblo. Two years ago, 231 people asking for help — both individuals and families — said they hoped to find work in the new marijuana industry.

That grew to 273 people in 2015, she said.

Stattelman argues there are three major reasons poor people are coming to Pueblo: legalized marijuana, the fact that Colorado has expanded its Medicaid health insurance program for the indigent (as part of the federal Affordable Care Act), and the county’s now-national reputation as a cheap place to live.

“Expanding Medicaid is certainly one reason people are coming to Colorado, but I still rank pot as the biggest attractor,” she said.

County officials report there are about 67,000 residents who receive some kind of disability payment.

If you are poor and want federal assistance in finding housing, you are looking for something called a Section 8 housing voucher. The Pueblo Housing Authority oversees that program locally. Once a person has qualified for that federal assistance, he or she can take the voucher from state to state — except for Hawaii and Alaska.

Laurie Linn of the housing authority said the agency has about 1,470 vouchers it administers. There are another 500 people on its waiting list (there is turnover), and the agency is about to open the list for more applications. Some Section 8 programs, such as Denver’s, haven’t opened their waiting list in years — which is one reason why more people wanting to move to Colorado are calling the Pueblo Housing Authority, Linn said.

In 2014, the agency received just 38 applications for Section 8 housing from out-of-state residents. Last year, that jumped to 452 applications. Part of the increase could be linked to the agency putting its Section 8 voucher application process online.

But Linn points out that whether the applicants are interested in legal marijuana or not, there is an indisputable surge in interest in moving to Pueblo County from people wanting housing assistance.

“The catch for Section 8 applicants is they are not allowed to use drugs in our houses, period,” she said. “Marijuana is still against federal law, and we make all our voucher applicants sign a letter of understanding that no marijuana is allowed, regardless of Colorado law.”

Linn said that in her experience, only one resident has ever been evicted for violating the drug policy.

Not everyone moving to Pueblo for legalized pot wants subsidized housing, either.

One local real estate agent said he recently checked on a small one-bedroom rental where a couple, their four children and two grandparents were living. Eight people in a one-bedroom house.

“A good friend of mine owns the property, and he said the couple were starting to miss rent payments,” the agent said. “He called it a pot problem, because they always seemed to have that.”

Tim Hart, director of Pueblo County Department of Social Services, said he is familiar with the anecdotal stories about poor people and marijuana.

He doesn’t disagree that there are more poor people coming to the county, but Hart says that’s true across the state. That more people are applying for Medicaid health insurance coverage can be traced to the fact that more now qualify, both longtime residents and newcomers, he said.

And the legalized marijuana industry has also brought new businesses and new employment to Pueblo County — about 1,300 jobs, according to officials — so it shouldn’t be surprising that a surge in migration by poor and low-income people would come along with it.

Carbondale police investigating pair of sex assaults

Carbondale police say they have a person of interest in connection with an alleged sexual assault that occurred just after midnight Friday on the foot path along Colorado 133 near Village Road.

The assault was the second such incident reported to police since late June, and the cases bear some similarities, Carbondale Police Chief Gene Schilling said.

Schilling said in a Monday news release that an adult female reported she was assaulted around 12:15 a.m. near the intersection that serves as the entrance into the Carbondale’s bus park and ride.

“A male suspect grabbed the victim from behind, touched her inappropriately and physically assaulted her,” according to the release.

The woman was able to get away and was taken to Valley View Hospital by ambulance with moderate injuries.

The attacker was described as a Hispanic male, approximately 5 feet 5 inches tall. Schilling said police do have a person of interest, but the case remains under investigation.

Schilling said a similar incident was reported around 11:50 p.m. June 28 near Gianinetti Park on Village Road, in which a female was grabbed from behind.

“The victim was able to yell and scare the attacker away,” Schilling said. That case is also still under investigation.

Police have “no current evidence that the two assaults are related, but feel that they are similar in nature,” Schilling said in the release.

Both incidents occurred in areas where people are known to walk at night, prompting a warning about walking alone late at night.

“We encourage people to walk with a friend, be aware of their surroundings and use extra caution, especially at night,” Schilling said.

Anyone with information about either incident is urged to contact the Carbondale Police Department at (970) 963-2662.

Glenwood Springs man arrested for attempted murder on Transfer Trail

Garfield County deputies arrested a 30-year-old Glenwood Springs man on an attempted murder charge Saturday after investigators say he sliced open his brother’s throat on Transfer Trail.

Brian Dunlap called up his brother, Jason Dunlap, 33, that day in hopes of tagging along for a camping trip to Haypress Lake north of Glenwood Springs.

The pair drove up Transfer Trail for about 7 to 10 miles and decided to stop and wait for a friend, according to the arrest affidavit.

They had a six-pack of Bud Light and drank a couple beers each, the affidavit said. Brian would later say the brothers got into an argument about four-wheeling routes. The pair frequently get into fights, both brothers later told police.

Brian said that Jason attacked him, so Brian pulled a pocket knife and slashed at his brother’s throat.

A deputy at Valley View Hospital would later observe a laceration to Jason’s neck about 4 inches long, 2 inches wide and 1 inch deep. A nurse reported that she could see an artery in his neck.

Jason was still able to talk to investigators that afternoon.

Luckily, soon after Jason’s throat had been cut, the friend they were waiting on arrived and took the injured man to Valley View.

Another man driving up Transfer Trail later found Brian Dunlap lying on the truck’s tailgate with a dog, the truck covered in blood.

“He asked the male if he was OK and the male fell off of the tailgate onto the ground,” according to an affidavit.

Brian told the man that he’d gotten into a fight with his brother and that he needed to get down the mountain to see if the brother was still alive.

With a tip from the man who’d picked him up, deputies later found Brian Dunlap at the trailhead with blood on his shirt and hands.

Deputies also saw Brian had a contusion on his left eye.

They didn’t find a knife in his pocket, as the man who picked him up reported, but deputies did see a lot of blood inside and outside of this pocket.

Brian told investigators that his brother had attacked him, which he said he “returned in kind” with the knife, according to an affidavit.

He said their “fight started because they were two siblings and there was nothing more to it.”

“Based on my training and experience, including being an instructor specializing in defensive tactics, it is known to me that a knife cut in the area of the neck can be fatal on multiple levels, to include severing the carotid artery or jugular vein,” a deputy wrote in Dunlap’s affidavit. “An edged weapon attack of this caliber to a high risk anatomy area such as the neck is indicative of attempting to murder the person that you are attacking.”

Dunlap faces charges of attempted second-degree murder, a class 3 felony, and first-degree assault, also a class 3 felony.

Dunlap’s bond was set at $60,000 upon his arrest, and Magistrate Holly Strablizky on Monday lowered it to $35,000 cash surety bond. Strablizky said the attempted second-degree murder charges carries a potential sentence of 10 to 32 years in prison.

Arts center eyes old library for new digs

Supporters of the Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts are lobbying City Council to consider relocating the arts center to the former library building, after the organization was displaced from its historic Sixth Street digs by a flash flood last month.
Though it appears the damage caused to the one-time hydroelectric plant building is not as severe as first feared and repairs are possible, the library building at Ninth and Blake still might be a better long-term home, arts center advocates said at the July 21 council meeting.
“There are a lot of reasons why this would be a good solution,” attorney Charlie Willman, representing the Arts Council, said of the former library building that, like the hydroelectric building, is owned by the city.
Among them is that the downtown location would be more convenient for parking and picking up and dropping off students for the various youth programs, supporter Maureen Taufer pointed out.
“The timeline is also critical for the arts council, because they are in the process of planning for their fall classes,” Willman said.
Even if the arts center returns to the former location, it still may not be able to use the dance floor because of structural issues that came up in a building assessment that was done after the flood, he said.
Christina Brusig, Center for the Arts executive director, said a survey of arts center patrons and others generated 1,000 signatures supporting the new location.
Moving to the old library building, which was abandoned in 2013 when the new Glenwood Springs Library was completed at Eighth and Cooper, would also bring more people to the downtown business core, Willman said.
A brief but heavy rainstorm on June 12 resulted in a deluge of water that poured in under the front door of the arts center. A worker who happened to be there and her son were able to move a baby grand piano out of harm’s way, but the flood saturated the dance floor in the main gallery space.
Since then, the arts center has been holding classes and other programs at a variety of locations, including the Masonic Lodge on Colorado Avenue and at the Glenwood Community Center.
But the former library building has been on its radar for some time even before the flood.
Two years ago the city obtained voter permission to sell the library building, after Garfield County expressed interest in acquiring the property for a senior citizens center. However, a contract to sell the building to the county fell through this spring after concerns surfaced about needed repairs to that building.
City Manager Debra Figueroa said at last week’s council meeting that the repair work is ongoing, including roof repairs and replacement of ceiling tiles; however some asbestos mitigation may be required. The elevator also is now working again, she said.
Whether the arts center, or any other organization, could move into the building anytime soon remains to be seen, Figueroa said.
Several groups have had their eye on the former library since the city began soliciting proposals for its possible reuse three years ago.
Bill Kight, director of the Frontier Historical Society and Museum, said the museum also is “bulging at the seams” and has had flood issues of its own. But he told council that his organization is willing to waive its interest in the library building if the Center for the Arts could make use of it.
Since the contract to sell the building to Garfield County fell through, the county has not expressed further interest in acquiring it, though the need for a senior center in Glenwood Springs remains of high interest.
City Council said it would continue to weigh the options for the arts center and consider the repair and maintenance needs of both buildings before deciding where and when it can move in.

Arts center eyes old library for new digs

Supporters of the Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts are lobbying City Council to consider relocating the arts center to the former library building, after the organization was displaced from its historic Sixth Street digs by a flash flood last month.

Though it appears the damage caused to the one-time hydroelectric plant building is not as severe as first feared and repairs are possible, the library building at Ninth and Blake still might be a better long-term home, arts center advocates said at the July 21 council meeting.

“There are a lot of reasons why this would be a good solution,” attorney Charlie Willman, representing the Arts Council, said of the former library building that, like the hydroelectric building, is owned by the city.

Among them is that the downtown location would be more convenient for parking and picking up and dropping off students for the various youth programs, supporter Maureen Taufer pointed out.

“The timeline is also critical for the arts council, because they are in the process of planning for their fall classes,” Willman said.

Even if the arts center returns to the former location, it still may not be able to use the dance floor because of structural issues that came up in a building assessment that was done after the flood, he said.

Christina Brusig, Center for the Arts executive director, said a survey of arts center patrons and others generated 1,000 signatures supporting the new location.

Moving to the old library building, which was abandoned in 2013 when the new Glenwood Springs Library was completed at Eighth and Cooper, would also bring more people to the downtown business core, Willman said.

A brief but heavy rainstorm on June 12 resulted in a deluge of water that poured in under the front door of the arts center. A worker who happened to be there and her son were able to move a baby grand piano out of harm’s way, but the flood saturated the dance floor in the main gallery space.

Since then, the arts center has been holding classes and other programs at a variety of locations, including the Masonic Lodge on Colorado Avenue and at the Glenwood Community Center.

But the former library building has been on its radar for some time even before the flood.

Two years ago the city obtained voter permission to sell the library building, after Garfield County expressed interest in acquiring the property for a senior citizens center. However, a contract to sell the building to the county fell through this spring after concerns surfaced about needed repairs to that building.

City Manager Debra Figueroa said at last week’s council meeting that the repair work is ongoing, including roof repairs and replacement of ceiling tiles; however some asbestos mitigation may be required. The elevator also is now working again, she said.

Whether the arts center, or any other organization, could move into the building anytime soon remains to be seen, Figueroa said.

Several groups have had their eye on the former library since the city began soliciting proposals for its possible reuse three years ago.

Bill Kight, director of the Frontier Historical Society and Museum, said the museum also is “bulging at the seams” and has had flood issues of its own. But he told council that his organization is willing to waive its interest in the library building if the Center for the Arts could make use of it.

Since the contract to sell the building to Garfield County fell through, the county has not expressed further interest in acquiring it, though the need for a senior center in Glenwood Springs remains of high interest.

City Council said it would continue to weigh the options for the arts center and consider the repair and maintenance needs of both buildings before deciding where and when it can move in.

Editor’s column: Just don’t picture them naked

Earlier this month, I had my 40-year high school reunion back in Beatrice, Nebraska, a county seat that’s about the size of Glenwood Springs, but with key differences.

First, it’s much less interesting. While the Homestead National Monument, commemorating one of the nation’s first claims under the Homestead Act of 1862, is right outside town, Beatrice doesn’t get a lot of tourists. Nor is it scenic, nor does anyone get excited about floating the Big Blue River (which actually is brown), which cuts through town. Then there’s the humidity of a Midwestern summer. Ugh.

I went to the reunion anyway, partly because my 94-year-old mother is in a nursing home there and I try to see her two or three times a year.

Not long after I signed up to attend the reunion, which included the classes of 1975 and ’77, I won the American Society of News Editors Burl Osborne Award for Editorial Leadership. This apparently convinced the reunion organizers that, in a group without professional athletes, entertainers, politicians or CEOs, I would be a good dinner speaker for the Saturday night banquet.

Oh, gosh.

That advice about imagining your audience naked when you are speaking doesn’t work so well at a 40th high school reunion. Some things you don’t want even your mind’s eye to see.

But I soldiered on, drawing heavily for my talk from a column I wrote in 2014 in praise of public schools as incubators of hope. Everything went fine, and, overall, I had a better time than I expected.

That’s been the case at all the Beatrice High reunions I’ve attended — maybe in part because I left town as soon as I could and didn’t go to a reunion until the 15th anniversary. By then, time had healed my wounds from our teenage years and my classmates had either forgiven or forgotten my bad moments. The 15-year reunion was enjoyable enough that I also attended the 20- and 35-year events, which came after Mom was widowed.

My takeaway from these gatherings is how our perceptions of high school are so oddly skewed.

In talking with people who were among the popular kids back then, or seemed to be, I’ve discovered they didn’t feel that way and had at least as much anxiety as I did and it still affects many of them. The guy who was our quarterback when we were seniors hasn’t attended a single reunion, even though he seemed extremely relaxed around everyone back then.

We obviously all struggled with the complexity of growing up.

At our 20-year reunion, I talked to a doctor’s daughter for a little while, and she told me about the embarrassment of her older brother driving her to school in his Corvette. She would ask him to drop her off a few blocks away. That seems like a First World problem, but it was as real to her as my embarrassment over shabby clothing that sometimes got me teased.

One woman, on whom I had a serious crush from ninth grade on but who ended up dating my best friend, told me 20 years ago that she lived with abuse at home. Her father would hit the top of her head with a butter knife and call her a slut when she was going out. She still has a terrible time feeling good about herself. She missed this year’s reunion because she is caring for her aging parents now, including the father who demeaned her.

The teen years of course are hard for everyone but the most clueless, and most of us carry a bit of the neurosis forward to adulthood. With any luck, we have enough experiences that teach us our intrinsic value as adults that we can get beyond our adolescent suffering.

But we learn defense mechanisms, too, that linger mostly unconsciously. I believe, for example, that many people learn to put themselves down as a prophylactic against criticism from others. If we point out our own flaws and are particularly harsh, I think we believe others are less able to hurt us. It also becomes part of our personal mythology and holds us back.

Most of us, inside, remain insecure at some level. And it’s a pity.

In preparing for my speech, I wrote the script as I have every other time I’ve done public speaking. About two weeks before the reunion, it hit me that I would be speaking to people I went to high school with. CRAP!

They knew me as the kid who couldn’t get a date, who drove beat-up muscle cars, wrecked one of them, flipped burgers for work and lived in the run-down house at the edge of town.

I decided I couldn’t think about who my audience was. I’d channel my mind back to the 2010 Detroit Free Press Michigan Green Leaders awards breakfast, which I emceed and whose other speakers included the publisher of USA Today and Bill Ford Jr., great-grandson of Henry Ford and chairman of Ford Motor Co. If I handled that, I could handle a bunch of no-longer kids from Hicktown, Nebraska.

In retrospect, it turned out that what I enjoyed about the talk is that I got to reintroduce myself to high school peers as a confident grown-up. I think I’ve finally left high school behind.

Randy Essex is editor of the Post Independent.

Bankers’ Hours column: Mortgage brokers are alive and well

Remember mortgage brokers, the alleged vultures that settled on the shoulders of unsuspecting borrowers and took their homes away, or pecked their eyes, whichever earned the highest commission?

A major impetus in the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was the eradication — or at least the incarceration — of the Snively Whiplashes of the lending business. And, if the feds didn’t get them, the smart money figured that the marketplace would take care of it.

As the Great Recession wound down to its final whimpers, and the casualties and crash debris were swept to the gutters of the financial industry to make way for the brave new world of lending, loan originators proliferated. Big banks ramped up mortgage divisions; online lenders hawked loan apps that are just an icon click away. With all of this, who needs mortgage brokers?

As it turns out, quite a few do. Or they decide to employ them. Why in the world would anybody want to do business with vermin? Well, one reason might be that the brokers that survived the Great Meltdown sport a high degree of professionalism and competence. In retrospect, as a group, they were no more responsible for the bursting of the housing bubble than were CEOs of Wall Street investment firms, bankers, builders, Realtors and, yes, borrowers.

Banks, the very entities that were supposed to put brokers out of business, are a big factor in the survival, and even expansion, of the broker profession. A lot of financial institutions, and especially smaller ones, have a very hazy idea of what their business actually is. They’ll tell you that it’s taking deposits and then lending the money out, when it’s really facilitating the movement of money, in any profitable and practical means possible.

So a surprising number of banks don’t even offer residential mortgage loans to their depositors, even though they could easily do so. They might extend themselves to refer the loan elsewhere but certainly not to the local branch of TBTF (Too Big To Fail) National Bank down the street. Rather, the deal goes to a mortgage broker.

But what about the banks that have an active mortgage lending operation, as many do? What about an online lender like Quicken Loans? Don’t they take pretty good care of their customers? Yes, they do — if you’re the right kind of customer, that is. However, if you, or your property, doesn’t fit the post recession Fannie Mae or regulatory cookie cutter profile, then you’re pretty much out of luck. If you don’t fit the mold, that online lender that touts fast funding and low rates doesn’t have an alternative deal for you.

A mortgage broker often does. He or she can represent a variety of lenders, ones that, for example, will make loans on so-called “hobby farms” in rural areas, or condotels in a Colorado resort. Some even have access to private lenders.

And then there’s the fact that we bankers are, well, bankers. We think like bankers, and we act like bankers. Bank mortgage loan personnel are good at taking an app sitting behind their desks, as long as it’s between eight and five (with an hour off for lunch). Very few of us will show up at a borrower’s home after supper, or on the applicant’s job site during lunch, or come in on a Sunday afternoon to take an application.

Brokers will, and do.

I do some consulting for small banks in connection with residential lending. In one instance, a client’s ad agency spotted a social media query from a home buyer: “Where do I go to get a home loan? I don’t want to deal with a bank.” Her reason: “I don’t think banks care about me as a customer, and they take a long time to process a loan.”

Not surprisingly, mortgage brokers do absolutely nothing to disabuse borrowers of this perception.

Pat Dalrymple is a western Colorado native and has spent almost 50 years in mortgage lending and banking in the Roaring Fork Valley. He’ll be happy to answer your questions or hear your comments. His e-mail is dalrymple@sopris.net.

Meet Your Merchant: Face to face with health-centered dentistry

How did your business start?

We each owned dental practices for many years; however, in 2012 we realized we needed to take some time away from dentistry, so we sold our practices and departed to South America for a “midlife adventure.”

While our time away was everything we hoped it would be, we developed some health issues on our trip that we elected to treat using more natural health remedies.

Through the research of these natural remedies we came upon the practice of biological dentistry, fundamentally the practice of more health-centered dentistry, and that is how Elevate Dental Wellness was born.

What do you sell?

Elevate offers comprehensive dental services for the entire family, with a focus on natural, whole-body health and its relationship with oral health. We offer a full spectrum of dental services ranging from cleanings and routine dental work, to complex restorative dental treatment, cosmetic dentistry, dental implant placement, even the treatment of sleep apnea.

Elevate Dental Wellness is the valley’s only biological dental office offering many services that are unique to our practice.

Why do you like what you do?

As dentists we spend a lot of time face-to-face with our patients. We love our patients, we love getting to know them, their families, and their way of life. We enjoy knowing the full scope of their lives — the happiness, the sadness, as it helps form strong, lifelong relationships built on trust and understanding.

We also enjoy being an integral part of taking care of our patients’ health. The mouth is a mirror and a gateway to your overall health, and we are excited to be playing a part in the transformation of the health and wellness of our patients.

What strategy do you use to hire good people?

For us, the biggest thing is finding employees that are like-minded — the people that smile at us when we smile at them. We can teach anyone how to work in our dental office, but you can’t teach energy. Good, positive energy is our only job requirement.

What is your strategy for growth in the next year?

Our strategy revolves around spreading the message of health and wellness and how it relates to oral health. We plan on giving presentations for various organizations as well as within the community at large to inform people about what we do, and what sets us apart.

Additionally, we know our patients will help us spread the word about the quality of service and care we provide and will help us build our practice by encouraging their friends and family to become patients.

What is the best thing about running a business here?

We are excited to be building our business in a great community that is growing and changing every day. We love being a part of the great energy that not only surrounds Willits, but also the entire mid-valley.

We also get to live and work among the people that are our neighbors, patients and friends. We enjoy getting to see, recreate and spend time with everyone that makes the Roaring Fork Valley an amazing place to live and work. We tried for a year to find a better place to live, and there just isn’t anywhere that compares to the Roaring Fork Valley.