Rich Lowry

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December 20, 2012
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LOWRY: What America's first Christmas looked like

Gen. George Washington's army retreated from New York in ignominy in November 1776. As it moved through New Jersey, Lt. James Monroe, the future president, stood by the road and counted the troops: 3,000 left from an original force of 30,000.

In December 1776, the future of America hung on the fate of a bedraggled army barely a step ahead of annihilation. The Americans confronted about two-thirds of the strength of the British army, and half its navy, not to mention thousands of German mercenaries. The defense of New York was barely worthy of the name.

When British troops crossed into Manhattan at Kips Bay, the Americans ran. Washington reportedly exclaimed in despair, "Are these the men with which I am to defend America?" Later, from the New Jersey Palisades, he watched as the British took Fort Washington across the Hudson, held by 3,000 American troops, and put surrendering Americans to the sword.

According to one account, Washington turned away and wept "with the tenderness of a child." British strategy depended on shattering American faith in the Continental Army and reconciling the rebellious colonies to the Crown.

As the Americans fled to the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River, the British occupied New Jersey and offered an amnesty to anyone declaring his loyalty. They had thousands of takers, including one signer of the Declaration of Independence. With expiring enlistments about to reduce his army further, Washington decided on a scheme to cross the Delaware on Christmas and surprise the Hessian garrison in Trenton. "If the raid backfired," Washington biographer Ron Chernow writes, "the war was likely over and he would be captured and killed."

Behind schedule, Washington's main force of 2,400 started crossing the river that night. Yes, most of them were standing up in flat-bottomed boats. Yes, there were ice floes. It wasn't until 4 a.m. that all the men were across the river. They had 9 miles still to march to Trenton in a driving storm and no chance of making it before daybreak. Washington considered calling it off, but he had already come too far.

Arriving at Trenton at 8 a.m., his spirited troops seemed "to vie with the other in pressing forward," he wrote afterward. They surprised the Hessians, who didn't expect an attack in such weather. The battle ended quickly - 22 Hessians killed, 83 seriously wounded and 900 captured, to two American combat deaths. "It may be doubted whether so small a number of men ever employed so short a space of time with greater and more lasting effects upon the history of the world," British historian George Trevelyan wrote.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David Hackett Fischer sees in the American resurgence after our fortunes were at their lowest a reassuring aspect of our national character in this season of discontent: We respond when pressed.

Dr. Benjamin Rush, a great supporter of the American cause, wrote: "Our republics cannot exist long in prosperity. We require adversity and appear to possess most of the republican spirit when most depressed." May it still be so.

Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review, a magazine founded by William F. Buckley Jr., featuring conservative commentary on American politics.


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The Post Independent Updated Dec 20, 2012 01:06PM Published Dec 20, 2012 01:04PM Copyright 2012 The Post Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.