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January 29, 2013
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CMC board decides to hold tuition for 2013-14 year

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colorado - There will be no tuition hike for students at Colorado Mountain College (CMC) for the 2013-14 school year and only two increases to student fees, following action on Monday by the CMC board of trustees.

The board adopted a recommendation from its tuition committee, which maintained that the school should hold the line on tuition costs.

"The college is facing decreased revenues from property taxes for a couple of years," stated a memo to the trustees from the tuition committee, "yet understands the state and national initiatives to curtail college cost and keep access to higher education affordable."

So, said tuition committee member Linda English at Monday's board meeting, "I am happy to recommend no tuition increase for next year."

She said that CMC, which has campuses in six counties, offers the best value in the state, when comparing tuition levels to the quality of education offered.

The school raised tuition last year, by $3 per credit hour for in-district students, $6 per credit hour for in-state but out-of-district students, and by $20 per credit hour for out-of-state students.

Currently, the college base tuition rate is $56 per credit, or $840 for a 15-credit course load for in-district students taking classes in the 100-200 level courses, according to the CMC website.

For 300-400 level courses, the basic in-district tuition is $95 per credit, or $1,425 for a 15-credit load.

The trustees briefly discussed the committee's recommendation, noting the fact that the college district has long striven to keep costs low and that enrollments have been rising in recent years.

"This is good stuff," Trustee Kathy Goudy of Carbondale said to board president Glenn Davis after approval of the tuition recommendation.

Student fees are also remaining much the same for the coming year, with two exceptions.

The school will begin charging students for placement testing, to the tune of $10 per testing session.

Previously, the first test has been free, but any subsequent testing has cost $20 per session.

Plus, a one-time fee of $315 for the Restaurant Management and Culinary course at the Steamboat Springs campus, to pay for chef's knives and a chef's uniform, was approved by the trustees.

According to a memo to the trustees, the fee is for a knife kit costing $240, and a uniform including a coat, pants, neckerchief, hat and apron, costing $75.

Debra Crawford, spokeswoman for CMC, said the culinary course is new, and this was the first time the board had considered the fee.

Brad Tyndall, senior vice president for academic affairs, told the trustees the same philosophy was at work in holding fees steady.

In other action the trustees:

• Adopted an interim "strategic plan" for college operations to finish the 2013-14 school year, while more complete revisions to the college strategic plan are under way for the following year.

• Announced plans to seek a replacement for former Trustee Anne Freedman of Basalt, representing Pitkin County. Freedman, whose term ends in November, resigned recently for health reasons. Applications to fill the post must be submitted by Feb. 15, and may be sent to Julie Hanson at the law firm, Beattie, Chadwick and Houpt, 932 Cooper Ave., Glenwood Springs, 81601.

• Elected Trustee Pat Chlouber of Leadville, representing Lake County, to be the board secretary, replacing Freedman in that role.

jcolson@postindependent.com


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The Post Independent Updated Jan 29, 2013 01:11AM Published Jan 29, 2013 01:09AM Copyright 2013 The Post Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.