Will Grandbois
wgrandbois@postindependent.com

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April 29, 2014
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City to use furniture designed by GSHS students

This summer, take a moment socialize by “The Worm,” relax on “The Whale,” lounge in the “Colorado Stargazer” and picnic on the “Parallelachair.” These four pieces of concrete furniture, designed and named by students at Glenwood Springs High School, will be deployed in Glenwood’s parks by the end of the school year.

The selected designs are just a few of the pieces put together as part of the (co)studio project taught by Matt Miller. The remaining pieces of furniture will be placed around the GSHS campus.

(Co)studio is an organization that partners with the school district in order to “connect hand to mind” by providing vocational training to high-schoolers throughout the valley.

On Tuesday, representatives from (co)studio, the city of Glenwood, Cruise-A-Thong and the Two Rivers Community Foundation gathered at Glenwood High to check out scale models of the proposed pieces and select four to place around town.

Materials costs for those chosen will be covered by Cruise-A-Thong, an annual “race for the average Jo(e)” that raises money to improve “the river experience” in Glenwood Springs. Cruise-A-Thong is working with the town to select sites in Veltus Park, the Whitewater Activity Area and the base of Three Mile Creek.

Cruise-A-Thong’s Katy Joy described the process of selecting a cause for their 2013 fundraiser. “We came in to see their cardboard models and said, ‘Yeah, this is a winner,’” she said.

Fellow organizer Tamra Allen nodded in agreement.

Ben Dunn was eager to show off the full scale cardboard model of the “Colorado Stargazer,” a jagged design that he said tilts your head back and invites you to look up, as well as echoes a geometric star. Gavin Mcgonigle added that the “Stargazer” was originally designed to express several different “moods,” from upright to lounging. Since the final product will weigh around 800 pounds, it will likely stay in its stargazing position.

Zac Mencimer, one of the designers of the “Parallelachair,” said the chair’s hollow rhombus design is deceptively simple. “Once you get the full picture it’s pretty complex and pretty great,” he said, adding that the piece “defies physics.”

The adults present seemed almost as enthusiastic as the kids.

“This is awesome,” said Tom Barnes of Glenwood Parks and Recreation. “This is the community involvement and partnership you love to see.”


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The Post Independent Updated Apr 29, 2014 11:04PM Published Apr 29, 2014 11:04PM Copyright 2014 The Post Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.