Matthew Morrison’s songs for swingin’ lovers at the Wheeler Opera House | PostIndependent.com

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Matthew Morrison’s songs for swingin’ lovers at the Wheeler Opera House

Matthew Morrison will headline the Wheeler Opera House on Tuesday evening.

If You Go …

Who: Matthew Morrison

Where: Wheeler Opera House

When: Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m.

How much: $78-$135

Tickets: Wheeler box office; http://www.aspenshowtix.com

Matthew Morrison has a Valentine's Day date with Aspen.

"I'm singing from the standards, so there are a lot of great love songs in there," Morrison said in recent phone interview from Los Angeles. "I'm excited to share the love."

The song-and-dance man of Broadway, film and TV fame is performing with a jazzy five-piece band on a tour that comes to the Wheeler Opera House on Tuesday.

Morrison's concerts offer a mix of material from his stage and screen career — from TV's "Glee" and Broadway's "Finding Neverland," "Hairspray," "South Pacific" — along with his charming spin on the classics of American song and some originals from his self-titled 2011 album.

"I always feel like I was born in the wrong era," said Morrison, 38. "I love the standards and all they represent and the gorgeous storytelling they did back in the day."

Morrison complements the crooning with a strong dance element in his concerts ("I'll be strutting my stuff all over that stage"). The California native, who made his Broadway debut in "Footloose" and got his star turn as Link in "Hairspray," has become one of the world's leading musical theater actors, while also winning over the masses as teacher Will Schuester on the television show "Glee," earning Emmy, Tony and Golden Globe nods along the way.

Morrison looks back on his time on "Glee" with pride.

"The further I get away from it, the more I realize how special it was," he said. "I could have been on any show and played a cop or a lawyer or something, but this is a show that I actually played an inspirational teacher."

The enormously popular and acclaimed "Glee" shifted the culture not only for musicals — it's no stretch to say it helped pave the way for a pop culture landscape where "La La Land" is a frontrunner for a Best Picture Oscar and "Hamilton" is a once-in-a-generation phenomenon — but also moved the needle for gay rights and marriage equality.

"The way it spoke to the LGBT community, at a very important time in our history — I see a family sitting down and watching 'Glee' together and then they turn off the TV and they have a conversation about what they just saw," Morrison reflected. "There was a lesson in every episode. For that, I'm truly grateful."

Cutting his teeth on Broadway, where the eight-show-a-week grind tests the stamina of the most gifted of singers and actors, prepared Morrison for hitting the road as a solo act. The strength of his voice has earned him some challenging roles — playing J.M. Barrie in "Finding Neverland," for example, he performed a dozen songs every night. So doing 15 or 16 on this national tour isn't as daunting as it might be otherwise.

"I think Broadway is the best preparation for anyone doing anything," he said. "All that training has built up my stamina to do something like this. … It's what I was born to do. It's my favorite thing to do."

Touring with a catalog of throwback tunes scratches a creative itch that Morrison isn't likely to lose, though he won't resist the siren song of Hollywood.

"My love for the stage will always be there, that's my number one place that I love to be," Morrison said. "But at this point in my career, I feel like I want to be doing more in front of the camera. This is the heyday of television."

From here, along with touring, Morrison hopes to continue being a part of what many have dubbed a "golden age" of television — he had a recurring role on the last season of "The Good Wife" and has more projects in the works. He's also at work on producing and starring in an original Broadway musical and has been work-shopping Stephen Sondheim's new "Bunuel." On the big screen, fans can see Morrison in the costume drama "Tulip Fever," due out next month.

Putting together a solo concert has also forced Morrison to play himself onstage — a relatively new role for the actor, and one he's growing into.

"You can always hide behind a character," he said. "With something like this, you have to trust yourself and know yourself and be confident. You can't hide. That's been therapeutic and it's something I've learned to find great joy in."

atravers@aspentimes.com