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Wednesday letters: Fire threat, housing and hiring, Cali water, slow down for school children

Fire mop up?

It’s insane that these homeless are allowed to reside in a wildfire area. This is not the first time there has been a fire up there. I guess the city is going to wait until hundreds of acres are burned and property destroyed.

Ken Fry, Glenwood Springs

Which is it?

I really do love seeing prominent local business owners upset over local rent costs because it’s making it hard for them to keep or hire employees. 

One of these prominent business owners wrote a short letter to the editor in April concerning this subject. So, I must ask, which is it? 

Do local property owners and managers lower costs or do you, the business owner, increase wages to match? Or is it a meet-in-the-middle kind of thing? 

Wages at this unnamed prominent business owner’s establishments are low and offer zero benefits to most employees such as sick pay, insurance, and/or vacation time. I know it’s never going to change, but I thought I’d throw that out there.

You can’t have it both ways. You can’t pay people minimum wage, and state in your mission statement that you “want to be the employer of choice.” 

If only top-level employees can afford to live in Glenwood and work in Glenwood, then you get what you get as far as other employees go.

Steve Poly, Rifle

More desalination plants

Colorado is facing a decades-long drought that has decimated the Colorado River. Millions depend on our river for water. I would urge the building of more desalination plants in California. 

California’s reliance on the Colorado River has become unsustainable. It’s just not feasible to expect Colorado to continue to supply their water. Cutbacks can only go so far. 

California needs to take more responsibility for their water needs. I hear people calling for cutbacks, yet desert communities aren’t draining their private pools, nor are they stopping the water use for unnecessary uses like golf courses. 

I don’t get the luxury of a personal pool because I refuse to waste that water. If people in Colorado have to tell farmers they have to cut back, then California better start to actually cut back. No more pools, no more golf courses, no more water parks. If they want those things, then they can build desalination to provide the water. Our river has been bled dry by their overuse of our resources, and it must stop.

Megan Jewell, Rifle

Slow down on Pitkin

School will be starting soon. Pitkin Avenue in Glenwood Springs is a School Zone from Eighth Street, past Glenwood Elementary School, to the high school at 14th Street. 

Besides school children, many other pedestrians, dog walkers and bicyclists use Pitkin Avenue. The speed limit is 20 miles per hour. Many property owners have placed “Slow Down in Town” signs in their yards. There are mid-crosswalk signs in some (but not all) of the intersections. There are some school zone signs, speed limit signs and a few flashing yellow lights. 

Still, most cars ignore the speed limit, especially in the three-block stretch between 11th and 14th where there are no stop signs. There is also a lot of commercial truck traffic. Large tractor-trailers block intersections trying to make turns to and from the side streets off Pitkin. 

The U.S. Postal Service’s contractor, MTC Logistics, has its noisy trucks running up and down Pitkin many times a day, instead of using Grand Avenue. 

The Washington Post recently quoted a Washington, D.C., council member: “It’s clear that just hoping that drivers will slow down near schools does not work. We need more traffic safety infrastructure like raised crosswalks, curb extensions and speed bumps that actually improve safety.” 

We urge the city to implement more robust traffic calming on Pitkin Avenue. Stop signs and mid-crosswalk flags at intersections would help. Requiring commercial trucks to use Grand Avenue would help. Speed bumps, raised sidewalks and curb extensions would help. More police traffic enforcement would help. Electronic speed signs would help. 

As the new school year begins, and the school buses start rolling, let’s all make an effort to make the school zone safer.

Glenn and Kris Chadwick, Glenwood Springs

Friday letters: YRC closing, Pagni, economics, politics

Recovery Center needed

I find it most ironic that an advertisement popped up today for Youth Recovery Center help, especially after the recent news that one of the most “prolifically financially fit” West Slope hospitals (also a 501c3, which merely means they don’t need to pay most taxes on their high wealth) is behind the decision.

With the amount of funds and the high salary of the CEO that VVH has, how can they think about closing this deeply needed resource? We continue to lose ever more mental health resources (or find they’ve been either deficient or actually dangerous) while near every page in our small papers are pushing alcohol sales and online gaming vids. 

I was one of many, many volunteers handling phone lines, sitting with the kiddos, reading, listening and more. My service was in the ’80s, while I was a SPED/PA at GSMS, seventh and eighth grade. Many of my own students rotated through there. I learned later, through their personal thank-yous, seeing one of their own teachers in there gave them confidence to try to move forward. It’s far past time we reach out to the dear, talented, intelligent but lost youth among us. All of the families need help, as well. Gratefully, there are now groups that do in-home re-direction and “family skills” training, to de-escalate what is an ever-more prolific problem. 

The youth of today are the future of us all. “Teach Your Children Well” — if only we could do that with even a modicum of modeling. 

Hopefully, YRC advertisement is an attempt to have “boots-on-ground” for whence some sanity returns and we wake up to this ever growing need.

P. Welch, Glenwood Springs

Empathy for Pagni

As the child of an alcoholic, I saw firsthand the devastation that alcoholism can have on a family, on a career, on personal relationships with friends, and on the health and well-being of not only the alcoholic, but every person who cares about him or her. Now we are all witness to this devastation as the consequences of alcoholism on a public servant, now former police chief of the town of New Castle, play out in our local media. 

No doubt Mr. Pagni has lost much recently because of the abuse of a substance that is legal and readily available, and perhaps was a source of comfort and detachment for someone with such a high stress job. 

Although I do not know Mr. Pagni personally, my heart aches for him and even more for all those that have been affected by this public display and its consequences. I experienced my father’s own share of very public displays of drunkenness and the behaviors that would have never occurred without the loss of judgment and kindness that alcohol takes from a normally rational and caring individual. 

The grips of alcohol addiction are as real as any other addiction or chronic disease, and affect so many more people than just the addict. And now in this case, the consequences have affected an entire community in a very public way. 

Most importantly, I would like to publicly thank the local law enforcement for handling this case properly and without prejudice towards the drunken actions of a local police chief that could have ended another person’s life. Mr. Pagni should also be thankful for this opportunity to overcome this dark chapter without these dire life-ending consequences. 

This does not have to be Mr. Pagni’s legacy, but instead the chance for a new beginning to face his addiction and create a new legacy. I sincerely hope he takes it. And if his story can create this opportunity for someone else out there experiencing alcoholism, please take it and get the help you need before your own dark chapter occurs. 

For help you can go to https://findrecovery.com/aa_meetings/co/garfield/.

Toni Barrett, Rifle

Economics lesson

Thanks Bryan Whiting for your column in Wednesday’s edition (8/3/22) of the Glenwood Post Independent. I sure hope a lot of folks take the time to read it and understand it. 

I’m quite afraid that a lot of folks didn’t get the opportunity to have your classes at Glenwood High School. Those lucky ones who did get to attend your classes do understand economics. 

It is apparent that many politicians and the folks that vote for “free stuff” do not understand, or do not care.

Ray Schmahl, Glenwood Springs

Fighting for America

Biden gave the order to kill Ayman Al-Zawahiri, the right-hand man of Osama Bin Laden, with just a drone strike and no one else injured. Al-Zawahiri was the mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks. Justice has been delivered! Biden was criticized for withdrawing the troops from Afghanistan, but as he has stated “You don’t need troops on the ground to rid the world of evil!” 

The Republicans stalled the “burn pit” bill, which is health care for our veterans, sickened by toxins while serving our country. I am thankful that the bill has passed with help from people like Jon Stewart and the folks who camped out overnight at the capitol building. The other bills that Biden is trying to get through Congress is climate change, voting rights for everyone, legalizing abortion and healthcare for women, restrictions on the assault rifles being sold to the public, in order to save our children from being massacred.

Biden is also fighting for Social Security benefits and Medicare and Medicaid and lowering prescription drugs. The Republicans are trying to take away our rights and benefits, while Biden and the Democrats are fighting for our country for democracy to survive in the 21st century. 

Our freedoms and rights are being challenged every day by the extreme right-wing Republicans. Please get educated, people. This election in November may determine whether we are going to continue as a democracy or an autocracy.  

Linda Carr, Eagle

Wednesday letters: Market farewell, counterpoints, senior thanks, slow down

Downtown Market thanks

The Glenwood Springs Downtown Market has permanently closed after 17 years. This was a very difficult and personal decision after weeks of uncertainty. In 2005 we were a group of women — Jan Harr, Erin Lee, Rona Chorman, Nancy Page, Sue Kuhn, Sharill Hawkins, Sue Sharpe and of course Julia Larson — who set out to bring people downtown to shop local and feel a sense of community. I think we accomplished that. 

In 2005 it only rained (heavily) for 12 of our 17-week season — we believe that was a test from above. From the beginning we were supported by so many businesses in the community — Valley View Hospital, Alpine Bank, Bank of Colorado, and Al Laurette from the city’s Parks and Cemetery Department. Al, you always had our back. Thank you, we could not have done it without any of you. 

Vid Weatherwax: Vid began volunteering to recruit our musicians and did a great job bringing not only some of the top local/valley musicians but from as far away as Chicago. Thanks, Vid — see him at the Vaudeville every week.  

We hosted several very fun events including pie and soup contests as well as mac and cheese contests; and of course, Oktoberfest, which brought out the “witchiness” in us. We made some great and very unique witchy hats that went out all over the state and beyond. John Patakay and his band, Alpine Echo, made Oktoberfest the best it could be. Along the way we began hosting the Grand Holiday with Santa and his reindeer. The county immediately jumped in and sponsored this event in its entirety — thank you.  

Many of our vendors had been with us since the very beginning or close to — Will Kogler’s bakery; we love his bread, pastries and those quiche, delicious. 

Sherman with your gyros, and “crepe guy” Jim Souza, we still miss you, Z’s Orchard and Skip Doty with Orchard Valley — you took a chance on us, and we will always be thankful for that. Mo’s Molicious Mustard, Roaring Fork Spice and Aspen Donuts — you started out with us; it was a great leap of faith for you that panned out.  

As the years evolved and we got older and had less and less fully functioning body parts, and we had worn out our husbands, we put out a call for help to set up and take down our tents. Feed My Sheep stepped up. There were many different men who helped us out, but a couple in particular stand out: Gray and Stuart, you saved us, and I believe we helped save you. You are forever in my heart.  

In 2010, our friend and fellow board member passed away. She left the market a bit of money, and with that, under the direction of Nathan Stowe, we built the Rona Garden in Centennial Park. It continues to flourish. 

I made many friends over the years and look forward to still seeing you out and about, and thank you for your kind words during this difficult time of closing the market. 

Cindy Svatos, Glenwood Springs 

Trio counterpoint

Monday (Aug. 1) in the Post Independent letters to the editor it was the Trump A-Team: Fred Stewart, Bruno Kirchenwitz and Pedro Navaja.

Everyone has an opinion and the right to express it here, where I frequently see all three of these fellows saying the same things over and over again; nothing new, nothing original, bland.

From the top, the U.S. is 24th in the world for polluting the air and water. That is an undeniable fact.

Former President Trump did not have the best economy in 50 years. That claim was debunked by the Brookings Institution, and when it appeared on Facebook it was flagged and taken down for being false.

Best economy in U.S. history was between 1992 to 2000. And former president Obama presided over one of the best economies. Trump? Had some bright spots. And billionaires got richer than ever before, didn’t they? Putin was much happier then, too.

Drill baby drill! An old slogan from the 1980s. George Bush in 2007 said something he was not supposed to say and it made some oil companies very upset. He said the U.S. has enough oil reserves to last us another 65 years. True story. Not a nice tourist destination, but Texas City down by Houston has millions of gallons of oil just sitting there in massive tanks.  

Donald Trump? Can anyone ever forget he sacrificed so many human lives to try to save the economy when COVID-19 hit us in early 2020? History will not be kind to him. Remember when Lauren Boebert said COVID-19 was a hoax? And the vaccines were poisonous? I sure do.  

In November, the U.S. House will probably swing to the GOP. But the U.S. Senate is currently holding fast for the Democrats. The new trend the GOP is trying to hide now is the new and improved White Christian Nationalist Church they are so excited about. Can you say white supremacy? Trump is done. DeSantis is FoxNew’s newest darling. Arizona politicians are tripping over themselves trying to be just like Trump. And so it goes in America.

Steven Gluckman, Glenwood Springs

Rifle Senior Center thanks

As a senior citizen living in Rifle for the last 25 years, I would like to thank the Rifle City Council and the Garfield County commissioners for the support that they give the Senior Center. 

Tami Sours and the staff do a tremendous job offering appetizing, nourishing and very delicious meals in a friendly atmosphere.

The center also has activities that the seniors may participate in and a pinochle tournament twice a month on Friday evenings, which are open to the public. We are fortunate to be residing in a caring community.

Kathryn S. Snyder, Rifle

Slow down, save money

“Take A Minute, Slow Down in Town” — every resident and business that has posted this sign wants the same thing that we all want, a safe existence and safe passage. 

Silver lining? If we slow down, coast more, brake less, drive with the flow, we’ll get higher gas mileage (more cash in our pockets). We’ll arrive at our destination less stressed. Give it a go, try to drive with and maximize on the “green” time of the 39 lights on Highway 82 as you head south. 

Driving more safely saves insurance dollars and perhaps collision repairs. We’ve got everything to gain as we drive to preserve all that we love about these valleys.

Diane Reynolds, Member Take A Minute/
Slow Down in Town committee, Glenwood Springs

Monday letters: COVID, mental health, youth recovery, CD3 debates, politics

Time to take COVID-19 seriously again

People have become complacent about COVID-19 just when it should be taken very seriously again. The current strain of COVID-19, BA5, is the most contagious yet and is ripping through the population regardless of previous COVID-19 infections or vaccines. There are multiple reports of people getting COVID-19 more than once (including BA5 itself). 

While BA5 is thought to be less severe than previous strains, particularly if you are vaccinated, there is still a very significant risk of getting long-haul COVID-19, symptoms that last for months and can lead to diabetes, heart disease, brain fog, loss of smell or taste, post traumatic stress disorder and neuropathy, among other things. 

The best estimates about the rate of long-haul COVID-19 is around 25% (1 in 4). What many people fail to realize is that the more times you get infected, the greater the risk of getting long-haul COVID-19. Getting COVID-19 twice means your risk of long haul goes up to around 44%. Getting COVID-19 three times and your risk goes up to around 58%.

Current estimates for the availability of an effective vaccine against BA5 is the end of October at the earliest.

So it’s time to again take seriously the risks. You need to isolate yourself if you are sick and to quarantine for at least five days if you’ve been exposed to someone who is sick. You can be infected with COVID-19 but be asymptomatic, so even though you feel well after encountering someone with COVID-19, you can be in fact spreading the disease. 

And if you are sick, please notify people you were around for the five days before you were sick. Lastly, please practice social distancing and use masks when indoors.

The people you save from major consequences of COVID-19 could be you and yours.

Jerome Dayton, Carbondale

Include resource info

I understand from reading the local/regional news, we have an addiction problem in the Roaring Fork Valley. Therefore, I appreciated Henry Maxwell’s column on Wednesday, July 27. However, how do people with addiction problems contact Henry Maxwell or any other resource locally available to help? 

If I were an individual in need of help due to my addiction, I may not be able to readily find someone, i.e., ability to use Google search, call 911, have the use of a phone, etc.

So, please, in the future, include resource contact information. “BTW, I know I’m not alone,” said the addict.

Suzanne Stewart, Glenwood Springs

Damaging Dem policies

I think it was Larry Kudrow who recently said on FOX, that a country needs three things to prosper: food, water and energy. America has an overabundance of all three. 

We have the cleanest air and water of any industrialized nation. Our midwest is the breadbasket of the world. And we have enough oil, gas and coal to last us for over 200 years. 

Unfortunately Joe Biden has hamstrung our energy sector. From day one, Biden has reversed every Trump policy that had made us energy independent and given us the best economy in 50 years, pre-COVID-19. 

The U.S. uses the same amount of energy whether it’s domestic or imported. Importing oil puts money in Russia’s coffers when we could be producing more energy and putting more money in our pockets.

Imported energy is much dirtier than what we produce. Joe is cutting our economic throats while virtue signaling green BS that’s causing more pollution.

Joe and the Dems can point fingers of blame and make new excuses daily. But not Dems nor their liberal media lapdogs can hide the pain all Americans are feeling in their wallets. Americans will vote with their wallets in November.

Joe’s problem isn’t messaging. Joe’s crazy far-left policies that are sinking his ratings. Own it, Democrats — you swapped out mean tweets for a puppet.

Bruno Kirchenwitz, Rifle

Disheartened by YRC closing

Reading about the youth recovery center at Valley View Hospital closing down is saddening. Although we live in such a beautiful place, this valley is no stranger to devastating substance abuse and mental health problems. 

I find the reasoning of not receiving enough reimbursement from Medicaid patients a cop out. I am very well aware that businesses need money to function. As a valley resident for almost my whole life, I’ve been a patient at Valley View. Yes, it’s nice the hospital looks like a 5-star ski resort, but at what cost? I think shutting down this program instead of working vigilantly to keep it open will just hurt our young people who need help. 

There is a severe lack of services for substance abuse and mental health for adults in the area, and taking away such an amazing program for our youth will only hurt them. I know I am not educated in the workings of a hospital, but I would really encourage the hospital board to reconsider this action. 

With our nation facing such heightened overdoses and depression, now is the time our youth need this program available to them more than ever. They deserve better from us regardless of their insurance policy and ability to pay.

Caitlin Palm, Rifle

Afraid to debate?

Why would you vote for a candidate who will agree to only one debate? Boebert refuses to commit to multiple debates and won’t cite why. 

Shouldn’t we as voters have multiple opportunities to see where a candidate stands on multiple issues? With so many issues facing District 3, wouldn’t more information be better?

Aidan Wynn, Aspen

Freedom of speech

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Too often people on the left wing of the spectrum try to silence those not as far left, or “woke” as themselves. Too often people on the right wing of the spectrum cower from debate because they don’t want to be called names. At that point, we are all stuck with a very small but very loud minority controlling the conversation, simply because the counterpoint won’t engage. It’s a brilliant plan for the left, if everyone else is OK letting their 1st Amendment rights be bullied away by the Marxist tactics of that very small minority.

Today, woke, radical left voices shout down opposing viewpoints by calling anyone that disagrees with them a “racist,” “bigot,” “xenophobe,” “homophobe,” etc. They tell you that you can’t say certain things, as though they are the self-appointed speech police. 

The more they say we can’t say something, the more urgent it is to say it. It has nothing to do with what they are telling us we can’t say and everything to do with our rights and our freedoms to say it.

Whether you are on the right or the left, or in the middle like most of us, you need to stand up for everyone’s right to speak. How will these woke mobs ever have the chance to become self-aware about where they are in the real world if the rest of us don’t stand up and not be afraid of honest dialogue. We don’t have to agree, but we dang sure need equal time. 

When facts and truth stand up to feelings and propaganda, then the instruments of oppression and the megaphones of liberal Marxist talking points have to deal with reality. That reality might just be that they are only parroting the propaganda that is being fed to them. Speak up. Defend your 1st Amendment.

Pedro Navaja, Glenwood Springs

False panic

Two ways to control a population is to buy off players to instill fear or blackmail the compromised. It’s nothing new. Tojo, Hitler and Mussolini were masters. Ironically, Roosevelt’s greatest task in World War II was outmaneuvering domestic enemies.

In today’s world, exaggerated COVID-19 mask mandates and fossil fuel guzzling automobiles predominate. Cloth masks don’t filter viruses, and the largest contributor of CO2 is heating and air conditioning, not automobiles … wildfires, anyone? 

Geothermal and on-demand hot water could mitigate the use of fossil fuels. Guess what the real reason is for the push to all-electric cars. What happened to hybrids that recharge their own batteries? That would take a strain off the power grids and supply lines. 

Don’t buy into manufactured panic. It’s competition between the elites to divide us, that makes them rich and powerful and that make us dependent on them and an over-strained and vulnerable power grid. Where will the elites be when something goes wrong?

Fear and intimidation from ideologues work, something Roosevelt knew, and that Americans before him had “overcome.” We, too, can overcome these grifters with common sense and transition into a sustainable future.

Fred Stewart, Grand Junction

Wednesday letters: RiverFEST coming, thoughts on hotel conversion, W. Glenwood water

Celebrate Glenwood Springs’ waterways at RiverFEST

Like many mountain communities, rivers shape every aspect of our daily lives in the Roaring Fork Valley. Luckily, the rivers in our community have numerous hardworking nonprofit and local government advocates with a mission to protect and enhance our essential water resources.

In Glenwood Springs, the River Commission is a volunteer group of residents with a passion for our rivers and the resources they provide: recreation, water supplies, ecosystems and an intrinsic natural value. The River Commission has several duties, including celebrating our annual river cleanup and engaging the community with awareness of issues facing our rivers. The River Commission also works alongside our City Council, city staff, other volunteer commissions such as Parks and Recreation, local nonprofits such as Roaring Fork Conservancy and Middle Colorado Watershed Council, to plan and promote events aimed at education and advocacy for our rivers.

August 13 is our annual RiverFEST, a river cleanup day where volunteers can float or walk the rivers through the city to pick up trash and debris followed by a celebration at Two Rivers Park with music, food, beverages and prize giveaways for all cleanup volunteers. The celebration is thanks to our sponsors, including Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park, Iron Mountain Hot Springs and other local businesses. Visit cogs.us/riverfest to register. Volunteering for the cleanup is not required to attend the celebration, but a donation is requested if you would like to join us to enjoy the food or beverages.  

The River Commission also hosts annual river restoration planting days on city-owned properties such as Two Rivers and Veltus Parks and hosts educational webinars with experts from our valley and beyond, covering topics from river ecology to post-fire impacts on water quality/fish habitat, city water conservation efforts and water efficient landscaping. For more on what we’re up to, stop by our public meetings the first Wednesday of every month at 7:30 a.m. in Council Chambers at City Hall. Thanks!

Chip Fisher, city of Glenwood Springs River Commission

Conversions make sense, but save MC water

The motel conversion for affordable housing is a sensible and creative approach to housing for lower-wage workers. What’s not to love about these proposed conversions? No need to pave over green space; no need to feed greedy developers; convenient bus access and nearby shopping; no long commutes. Best of all, it could happen really fast.

I was pleased that City Council dropped the mandate for city water as the only acceptable source for fire suppression systems, and even happier when several council members suggested mediation to resolve long-standing conflicts with the Mitchell Cooper water system, which has historically served the motels considering converting, as well as several mobile home parks. The MC system needs to upgrade its filtration system to meet health and safety requirements. The mobile home parks using MC are affordable in large measure because that water is cheaper. For the city to require the converting motels to switch to city water would cut deeply into the MC customer base, harming the MC corporation’s ability to afford the needed upgrades to continue to supply the parks. 

I have heard that each mobile home park might be facing costs in the $100,000 range to switch to city water — costs that would be passed along to the residents, making them no longer affordable and tempting their owners to sell and redevelop the land. 

Let’s not jeopardize the affordable housing we already have. It is certainly in everyone’s interest to have two viable local water systems for the price of the improvements to MC’s existing infrastructure allowing it to meet fire suppression standards.

The MC corporation has some internal conflicts that need to be resolved and lingering conflicts with the city as well. The situation seems made to order for resolution by mediation, since there are so many common interests. We have skilled mediators in our valley. What are we waiting for?

Laurie Raymond, Glenwood Springs

Monday letters: Brit perspective, Midland fencing, crude trains, RiverFEST, housing, Boebert

C’mon, Yanks, fix it

As a Brit, I am dumfounded by you Yanks. There are three main reasons that Americans own guns: for hunting, for target shooting (both hobbies) and for self-defense.

As a ham radio operator and fisherman, my hobbies require that I obtain licenses, follow rules and pass exams (for ham radio, which has never killed anyone). Many activities are regulated. Driving, flying a plane, even giving financial, medical or legal advice requires a license, tests and regulation.

But guns require none of this. Guns killed 45,000 people in the U.S. in 2020, 15 times the number killed on 911. Yet the epidemic of gun violence gets no response from government at any level. Only a handful — a pittance — of these deaths involve people defending themselves. Why do we trade this pittance for 45,000 annual deaths? Children, victims or inadvertent perpetrators. Spouses, killed in the heat of arguments. Suicides, which comprise half of gun deaths, are quick, easy and painless with guns. Would suicides go down if guns were less available? Of course they would.

And then there are assault weapons. What is the place for semiautomatic military weapons in the hands of nonmilitary or non-law enforcement personnel? They are useless for hunting, redundant for target shooting and overkill (pun intended) for self defense. Operational artillery pieces and machine guns are not allowed in private hands. Why should these weapons of war be allowed?

It’s time to ban assault weapons, license guns and establish prerequisites before a license is issued. Just like other hobbies.

The 400 million guns in America make this daunting but not impossible. The DOT, FAA and AMA license drivers, pilots and doctors. Expand the ATF or FBI to address qualifications and gun licensing. 

City staff go ballistic writing regulations after a serious injury at the farmers market, yet no one addresses the 800-pound gorilla in the room.

In Britain, it took just one school shooting to pass major gun control laws. Britain now averages about 30 gun deaths annually, not 45,000. Get it right, America. You went to the moon. You can fix this. 

Richard Todd, Glenwood Springs

Midland eyesores

I’ve been in town a little over 30 years and watched a few changes. The last couple of years watching the Midland improvement between 27th Street and Four Mile has been quite an interesting journey. Final touches have been installed in the last couple of weeks, which had me a little puzzled. 

Who signed off on the fence design between 27th and Four Mile Road on Midland? The mishmash of fences destroyed the project in the final phase. 

I would hope somebody would take a second look at how they finish this project. Four different fences along the stretch plus the rock impact wall has made it an eyesore.

Ron Myers, Glenwood Springs

Crude trains threaten Colorado

The lifeblood of the American Southwest is the Colorado River. It supplies 40 million people with irrigation, drinking water, hydropower and recreation.

This vital artery is threatened by a plan by Houston-based Drexel Hamilton Infrastructure Partners and Rio Grande Pacific Corp. to ship 5 billion gallons per year of extremely viscous crude oil by rail from the Uinta Basin in northeast Utah to the Union Pacific line in Grand Junction, along the Colorado River, through Glenwood Springs and Glenwood Canyon, and on to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.

This stuff is so thick it has to be transported in heated rail cars that can keep the material above 100 degrees Fahrenheit or it will congeal into a solid mass. It’s even nastier than the Alberta tar sands, which, unfortunately, can be transported through pipelines.

Can you imagine what a carload of this gunk would do to the mighty Colorado if it spilled into the river? Glenwood Canyon has a history of wildfires and resultant mudslides. A simple derailment could turn into a major disaster.

Environmental groups and governments like Eagle County have opposed this plan and filed lawsuits, but recently the Forest Service approved it despite a memo from the heads of the Department of Agriculture and the Forest Service to “address the climate crisis.” How is adding the Uinta Basin crude to the fossil fuel mix going to do that? Analysts say it’ll increase our national greenhouse gas emissions by 1%.

A few years ago, Ursa Resources wanted to drill an injection well 50 feet from the Colorado River and the Battlement Mesa PUD’s fresh drinking water supply. Injection wells drive wastewater, brine and chemicals into geologic formations below.

Don’t tell me these corporations are patriotically seeking to achieve energy independence for America. We’ve been a fossil fuel exporter since 2011. Like most enterprises in this capitalist society, they’re out for the almighty buck, and if 40 million people suffer the consequences, that’s collateral damage.

Those who oppose the rail line can file another lawsuit, and there are still suits pending in Utah and Washington. What you can do is contact the Forest Service and express your outrage at their decision on the Uinta Basin rail line.

Fred Malo Jr., Carbondale

Celebrate rivers at RiverFEST

Like many mountain communities, rivers shape every aspect of our daily lives in the Roaring Fork Valley. Luckily, the rivers in our community have numerous hardworking nonprofit and local government advocates with a mission to protect and enhance our essential water resources.

In Glenwood Springs, the River Commission is a volunteer group of residents with a passion for our rivers and the resources they provide: recreation, water supplies, ecosystems and an intrinsic natural value. The River Commission has several duties, including celebrating our annual river cleanup and engaging the community with awareness of issues facing our rivers. The River Commission also works alongside our City Council, city staff, other volunteer commissions such as Parks and Recreation, and local nonprofits such as Roaring Fork Conservancy and Middle Colorado Watershed Council to plan and promote events aimed at education and advocacy for our rivers.

Aug. 13 is our annual RiverFEST, a river cleanup day where volunteers can float or walk the rivers through the city to pick up trash and debris followed by a celebration at Two Rivers Park with music, food, beverages and prize giveaways for all cleanup volunteers. The celebration is thanks to our sponsors including Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park, Iron Mountain Hot Springs, and other local businesses. Visit cogs.us/riverfest to register. Volunteering for the cleanup is not required to attend the celebration, but a donation is requested if you would like to join us to enjoy the food or beverages.  

The River Commission also hosts annual river restoration planting days on city-owned properties such as Two Rivers and Veltus parks and hosts educational webinars with experts from our valley and beyond, covering topics from river ecology to post-fire impacts on water quality/fish habitat, city water conservation efforts, and water efficient landscaping. 

For more on what we’re up to, stop by our public meetings the first Wednesday of every month at 7:30 a.m. in Council Chambers at City Hall. Thanks!

Chip Fisher, city of Glenwood Springs River Commission

Affordable for whom?

“Affordable housing” is a phrase I hear or see all the time. It comes up in newspaper articles, public meetings, and any discussion with anyone about current affairs. Often attached is a phrase like “desperately needed.” Usually there is some great problem this solves; like commuter and general traffic, or provide needed employees to businesses, or house necessary workers like cops, bus drivers, nurses or teachers. Aspen-
Pitkin County has one of the country’s leading programs for their size with around 3,000 units. 

But hold on — 3,000 units and there are still not enough? Build and build and still not enough? Why not?

Two big reasons. First, affordable housing is itself a growth generator. And second, the constant increase in the business sector is the primary cause of growth. In the first case, putting people in new housing is not like putting skis in a closet that you take out only when you need them. These human beings need the complete infrastructure that residents do. Every facet of that support has to expand. And more new people are needed to fill those slots. 

In the second case, there are new stores, lawyers, doctors, businesses like banks, restaurants, Uber drivers, city clerks, lift attendants, etc. These are new jobs that need new people to fill them. New people need new housing. Vicious circle.

There is a simple solution. Stop the growth. No more business permits or licenses. No expansions. Put a limit on the number of businesses and on the number of employees. No more employee housing. There is “enough” of both of those things. There is no “constitutional right” to open any business in any place. Let the existing businesses compete for the existing employees. Let the market sort itself out. 

Patrick Hunter, Carbondale

Boebert’s climate stance against ag

Many of the constituents of Lauren Boebert are farmers and ranchers. I question how much Boebert is concerned about their well-being. 

There is no occupation affected more by droughts, temperature increases and extreme weather events than farmers and ranchers. Yet Boebert, as a Trump cult member, does not believe climate change is caused by our burning of fossil fuels and thinks it is a big hoax. 

If she truly cared about the large number of people in her district engaged in the agricultural sector, wouldn’t she support efforts to combat climate change?

Dave Ryan, Montrose

Wednesday letters: Autism safety awareness, Bruno, selfless driving tips

Help keep people with autism safe

As a parent of an individual with autism, my biggest fear is that my son will wander from a safe environment and away from his caregiver. According to the CDC, 1 in 44 children and 1 in 88 adults have autism nationally. It is important to create awareness of the safety concerns associated with autism. Why? Wandering or leaving a safe environment is not uncommon for those with autism or other intellectual disabilities. In fact: 

People with autism are three times more likely to die from injury than a neurotypical peer. For individuals under age 15, it is 40 times more likely. 

When a person with ASD wanders, nearly half of all fatalities occur in under one hour. 

20% of wandering/elopements occur from the place of residence. Risk is higher when traveling, visiting relatives, when engaged in outdoor recreation or in a vehicle.

40% of wandering/elopements take place when transitioning activities or locations.

Drowning is the leading cause of premature death in autism. 71% of all deaths for children with ASD between 2011 and 2017 were accidental drownings. They are 160 times more likely to drown than nondisabled peers, and 76% occur in natural bodies of water.

As a parent of an autistic son, these statistics are terrifying. Virtually all autism parents have had experiences where their child got away, be it for a moment or for several hours. Awareness of this issue is of utmost importance. If you encounter a person with autism or intellectual disability who has become separated from their caregiver, give this person space, use simple sentences with a kind voice, avoid quick movements and contact local law enforcement. 

Ascendigo Autism Services has developed training materials to educate and assist first responders if a person with autism wanders from a safe environment, and I am immensely grateful that our local law enforcement has these resources. Ascendigo has also developed materials that will help caregivers and schools implement safety measures. Thank you to the Roaring Fork Valley Community for its commitment to keeping our children safe.

Kim Birch, Glenwood Springs

Bruno’s ‘on the mark’

The letter “Off the Mark” by Bruno Kirchenwitz recently (6/11/22) was “on the mark” and a very good letter, naming problems that our country is facing with this present administration. 

He outlines everything, including Afghanistan, open borders, inflation, school shootings in “gun-free schools,” and many more too numerous to mention. It is a good read, and should be read. 

Thank you to Bruno and thank you to the Post Independent for the printing.

Sharon Ramey, Gypsum

Drive with others in mind

The accelerators in our vehicles are indeed miraculous, allowing us to move tons of weight with a mere depression of the foot. It does not, however, connect us to a time machine (arriving in the blink of an eye) or a magic wand (making drivers ahead of us disappear).

Take a minute, think about it, it’s important to know what kind of driver we are: emotional or logical?

Emotional drivers are self-centered, stomp on the gas, stop light race, bumper chase, fuel waste, dart from one lane to another and threaten all on the road and along the road.

Logical drivers accelerate gradually, preserve two seconds worth of life-saving spacing, acknowledge that they share the road ahead with other vehicles and flow with the “green” time of traffic lights. At the end of the day they’ve maximized their fuel dollars and driven with everyone’s safety in mind.

Why persist in driving like there’s no tomorrow? It just might be that day, if not for you, for someone else. 

Diane Reynolds, Steering Committee member, Take A Minute/Slow Down in Town, Glenwood Springs

Monday letters: Rifle annexation, Glenwood Habitat plans

Now is the time to preserve undeveloped space in Rifle

Ask yourself what matters most in our surrounding Rifle area; saving the few remaining wildlife habitats or packing cracker-size houses in like sardines? We do need housing for the influx of people. However, Eco Dwelling wants to overload our undeveloped wild areas with building high density housing in four locations. Two locations are OK, next to the hospital and behind City Market gas station. 

The other two areas on West 16th Street going up the hill toward the high school have been used by wildlife as a safe habitat. Even now, you can drive by and see deer grazing in the open field at certain times of the day. Turkeys have been seen there and foxes also looking for an easy meal. 

Most of this area is within the city limits and will be more difficult to stop construction. It is the lower area, in Garfield County that needs to be kept as a green, open space for our future generations to enjoy our wildlife habitat. Please tell City Council no to annexation into the city. You, the longtime residents, have seen the decline of our mule deer due to development. 

From April 14-21, Garfield County conducted a vehicle count survey. The results in seven days were 10,317 vehicles driving the road with an average speed or 35 in a 25 mph zone. Imagine another 60-plus cars using this road. 

Rifle and Garfield residents, help keep this area an open green zone and wildlife habitat. Let City Council know you want to keep some of our western lifestyle intact that Rifle is known for. Make your voices heard at City Council meetings every first and third Wednesday at 7 p.m.

Petitions to stop annexation can be found at: Action Shop Services, Crescent Moon Spiritual Goods, Idos Motorcycle Repair, Order Up Restaurant and Shanghai Restaurant. Petition packet contains information on this proposed development to include maps, letters of concern and number of sites.

Harold D. Martinez, Rifle

City should hit brakes on leasing land to Habitat in Glenwood Springs

The city is now going to do a long-term lease with Habitat at the Eighth and Midland location, thus avoiding any public vote. Had the city sold the property to Habitat, a public vote probably would have been required.

I have indicated before I am not against affordable housing, just at this location. I was always taught that you do not solve a problem by creating another one.

This will only make the congestion worse and harder for the Cowdin residents to enter onto Midland or Eighth Street. Before any of this happened, a traffic engineer should have been hired to forecast the future for this area. Council in the past had passed a resolution that if there were ever a bypass built, this Eighth Street area to 14th would be the preferred location. The city right now is working on “The Eighth Street Landing” project, which, if came to being, would only create more density. Habitat is going to go through a public process, which tells me the city is on board.

The councilman for this area should be out talking to the residents in his district and getting a feel of what they want to take place at this intersection.

Council needs to also produce any minutes (including executive sessions) of when this purchase happened back in 2005. If the city wants to do something positive in this area, clean up the old sewer plant property to be used by the public as open space and a means to access the river trail.

Don “Hooner” Gillespie, Glenwood Springs

Friday letters: Run thanks, Crystal protections, parking concern, disability awareness

Maggie’s Mountain Run thanks

I am writing to thank everyone who came out and participated in the first annual Maggie’s 10K, 5K and mile Mountain Run. I also wanted to thank all the volunteers, sponsors, Jim and Cyndi McGinnis (Maggie’s parents) and Tina Leyba (photographer). Finally, I want to thank Fire Chief Gary Tillotson for coordinating the on-site ambulance. 

We had a successful event and raised money for childhood cancer. More importantly, we are able to assist a local child fighting pediatric leukemia, Manuela Perez, who also attended and handed out the runner awards. 

It was a beautiful day, and we had 158 total runners and hikers at the event. For more information regarding the Miracles From Maggie Foundation, please go to www.miraclesfrommaggie.org.

Rick Chavez, Glenwood Springs

Save the Crystal

I recently attended the Colorado River District’s State of the Rivers event in Carbondale. The evening’s presentations reminded me of the major water challenges we face in the West and just how special it is to live near the Crystal River — one of the state’s last undammed, free-flowing rivers. 

Our rivers are indeed at a dire point as demand continues to increase while water supply keeps dropping. As someone who lives along the Crystal River and has spent years advocating for its protection, I was happy to see the Colorado River District acknowledge the community’s desire for protections on the Crystal by including a presentation on Wild and Scenic eligibility at their event last month. 

As the pressure to develop every last drop of water keeps increasing, it’s even more important now that we set protections in place for something as rare as the free-flowing Crystal River. A Wild and Scenic designation for the Crystal is the only way to truly ensure that this remarkable river remains the way it is, and forever remove the threat of dams or out-of-basin diversions. We can do this at the same time we protect in-
basin water rights and the augmentation needs of the valley.

Let’s come together and protect this treasured river in our backyard by advocating for a Wild and Scenic designation.

Chuck Ogilby, Carbondale

Celebrate another kind of independence

I am a lifelong local of the Roaring Fork Valley and board president of The Arc of the Central Mountains. As someone living with a physical disability, I am excited to celebrate the 32nd anniversary of the signing of the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act). 

The ADA protects the rights of people with developmental disabilities to be included in all aspects of society. Without this historic movement, I and many others would not live as comfortably as we do. 

I hope everyone comes out and supports us on July 26 at Two Rivers Park at 6 p.m. to celebrate independence. For more information about this event, please call or text me at 970-319-8780.

Corey Mineo, Glenwood Springs

Beware coming parking changes

If you live on a cul de sac in Glenwood Springs, be aware the city is planning on restricting parking in the near future. 

So far, residents have not received any formal notification, but sign posts have been installed (under the orange traffic cones in your cul-de-sac — and if you don’t have cones yet, they probably are coming!). 

You could be losing the ability to park in front of your home if you live in the end of the cul-de-sac. And if you live along the approach to the cul-de-sac itself, you will find it more difficult to park in front of your homes as well as parking is pushed out.

The reason for this action is to make it easier for fire trucks to turn around. 

Come to the July 21 Glenwood City Council meeting at 6:15 p.m. for the open comment period. Send letters to your council person or the acting city manager, Steve Boyd, and let them know how you feel about this.

Donna Yost, Glenwood Springs

Autism safety awareness

As a parent of an individual with autism, my biggest fear is that my son will wander from a safe environment and away from his caregiver. According to the CDC, 1 in 44 children and 1 in 88 adults have autism nationally. It is important to create awareness of the safety concerns associated with autism. 

Why? Wandering or leaving a safe environment is not uncommon for those with autism or other intellectual disabilities. In fact: 

People with autism are three times more likely to die from injury than a neurotypical peer. For individuals under age 15, it is 40 times more likely. 

When a person with ASD wanders, nearly half of all fatalities occur in under one hour. 

20% of wandering/elopements occur from the place of residence. Risk is higher when traveling, visiting relatives, when engaged in outdoor recreation or in a vehicle.

40% of wandering/elopements take place when transitioning activities or locations.

Drowning is the leading cause of premature death in autism. 71% of all deaths for children with ASD between 2011 and 2017 were accidental drownings. They are 160 times more likely to drown than nondisabled peers, and 76% occur in natural bodies of water.

As a parent of an autistic son, these statistics are terrifying. Virtually all autism parents have had experiences where their child got away, be it for a moment or for several hours. Awareness of this issue is of utmost importance. If you encounter a person with autism or intellectual disability who has become separated from their caregiver, give this person space, use simple sentences with a kind voice, avoid quick movements and contact local law enforcement. 

Ascendigo Autism Services has developed training materials to educate and assist first responders if a person with autism wanders from a safe environment, and I am immensely grateful that our local law enforcement has these resources. Ascendigo has also developed materials that will help caregivers and schools implement safety measures. Thank you to the Roaring Fork Valley Community for its commitment to keeping our children safe.

Kim Birch, Glenwood Springs

Monday letters: Guns, traffic enforcement

Protect kids, not guns 

There are now over 300 “mass shootings” in America as of July 4, 2022, and we are only half way through the year. What is happening in our country, when the Supreme Court won’t act on getting assault rifles out of the hands of dangerous people? There are now more guns in America than there are citizens. Perhaps the Supreme Court needs to be expanded or maybe investigated? 

The words used by the people on the Fox propaganda/entertainment channel is “baby killers,” referring to the rights of a woman to have an abortion and control over her own body. It is more appropriate, is it not, to call the people supporting the NRA “baby killers”? 

The school shootings since Columbine in 1999 seem like a monthly occurrence, and nothing is being done to change the laws to acquire assault rifles. We all know the reason is “dark money” from the special interests, such as the NRA, given to the politicians for their campaigns.   

Doing nothing in this carnage is a sin, Republicans. Please stop pretending you are “God-fearing Christians.” What would Jesus do? Isn’t that one of your mantras? It seems as though you love your guns more than your children. We are the only developed country in the world to have these mass murders almost daily. Do something, senators, our children, and our future, is dying. I’m really tired of hearing “thoughts and prayers.” We need action now. 

Linda Carr, Eagle

Off the mark

Deb, the Garfield County Dem chair, wants to teach us about gun safety? (PI, June 17, Dems column). Taking advice about gun safety from the party that gave the Taliban $80 billion worth of the latest, most lethal weaponry known to man is hard for me to swallow. Deb’s Dems have shown abysmal ineptitude in Joey’s first year and a half. Afghanistan, open borders, crime, inflation and even baby formula. You’d think a smidgen of self awareness or contact with reality would cause Dems enough embarrassment to shut up.

But no. We can pass laws till the cows come home, but we can’t legislate morality. We can deter criminals with severe consequences. A tragic mass shooting ignites great passion, yet the murder numbers in our urban gang war zones are far greater. But they spawn as much interest as the weather report.

Our children deserve as much and more security than our banks or airports. Every school should have armed security on site, and we should use unspent COVID-19 billions to upgrade safety. 

But instead of solutions, Deb chooses to blame the NRA for school shootings. Dems have to denigrate to divide us so they can dominate.

All mass school shootings happen in “gun free zones,” and no NRA member ever caused one. Those intent on killing children, for whatever psychotic need, don’t fear laws or care about zones. However, lethal security might change the mind of craven, misfit cowards who seek the path of least resistance and risk.

Too bad the Dems removed armed security from teachers’ unions controlled schools because it might traumatize kids. I wonder how traumatized the survivors of that Texas blood bath were. 

Safety for all Americans begins with removing criminals from society. By ending Dems’ no-bail laws. By recalling Dem pro-crime, Soros-backed DAs. By refunding police and respecting the sacrifices they make every day while protecting us.

It’s like we’re watching Joe Nero fiddle while the U.S. burns. Luckily, the cavalry is coming in November. Hopefully Deb’s Dems haven’t destroyed our country by then.

Bruno Kirchenwitz, Rifle

‘Me first’ drivers

Thank you Mark Barritt (LTE July 8). I think the city of Glenwood Springs should throw away every stop sign and speed limit sign in the trash and save their money. Not many people abide by them anyway. 

We, too, have been on Glenwood streets and been passed like we are standing still. We were passed on Colorado Avenue, guess we were not going fast enough for the passer. We have been passed on Midland; we thought the person was turning but he raced past us via the turn lane and flipped us off. 

The worst intersections from our travels are the three-way stop at GSHS and at Eighth and Pitkin, and it is very near the police station. People just play the “me first” game not caring who is in their way. 

The 27th roundabout is a joke and very dangerous. The yield signs don’t mean a thing as no one yields to anyone else; it is the “me first” thing again. Here, you take your life in your own hands and pray for the best!

C.D. Gilliam, Glenwood Springs

Disheartend by gun stance

It was disheartening to read the letter of July 8 by Pedro Nevaja, who lives in our Glenwood community. His is a minority opinion in his belief that ownership of guns will be threatened by gun control laws controlling aspects of gun availability. 

Seventy percent of Americans disagree. They want these laws; 45,000 people died from gun violence in 2020, according to the CDC. As far as I know, no one except convicted felons or red-flagged people deemed a danger to themselves or others, has been denied gun ownership. One fear seems well-founded, the other is factually unfounded.

I am unsure why Mr. Nevaja argues that the U.S. pulling out of the unwinnable war in Afghanistan is an abdication of our defense. We invaded Afghanistan like the Russians before us and they successfully rejected our foreign dominance. Notably, this was without every man, woman and child in Afghanistan owning a gun.

Weapons of war are not meant for self-defense. Gun control is overdue. Laws should be for the protection for minorities and nonminorities alike. Many immigrants have chosen the U.S. for its safety and stability. I prefer decisions of life and death be made by people I elect, rather than the aggrieved gun owner down the street. I support bans of high capacity guns and raised age limits for ownership, now.

Barb Coddington, Glenwood Springs

In support of traffic cops

A recent article talked about putting signs along Grand Avenue to reduce speeding. The signs along Grand Avenue saying “take a minute” and “slow down in town” show that there is a concern from our citizens to get drivers to slow down. 

I agree with Chief Deras that a law enforcement position, dedicated to traffic on Grand Avenue and Glen Avenue, would bring better results. Does Glenwood PD have the staffing to make this happen? If you stop a vehicle in “rush hour” traffic, you cannot clog up the lanes, causing more problems. That vehicle must be moved to a side street, which can be accomplished with a little effort on the part of the officer. 

As I drive the speed limit on Grand and Glen, I get passed like I am standing still. This occurs every time I drive down those streets. As I enter Grand and Glen from side streets, at the traffic lights, invariably someone runs a red light. I have seen semi trucks, pickups and cars of all types run these lights. I am not talking about a light turning yellow! I am talking about a light that has been solid red for several seconds. Someone is going to die or be seriously injured by these red light runners. 

Speed will, in fact, be a factor in these situations. When people decide they are going to run a red light, what do they do? That’s right. They hit the gas! How about signs saying “run a red light, get a ticket”? I guess we could not do that, because it would show us to be an unfriendly city.

I have three tips for drivers (especially young drivers): 1. When a light turns green, do not go. First, look both ways for speeding vehicles that you know will not be able to stop. 2. Look again. 3. Always wear your seat belt. Your life and others’ may depend on it. 

I have seen vehicles coming into town on Highway 82 traveling at 65-85 mph. The speed limit drops from 55 to 45 to 35 and then 25 mph as you come into town. Many people pay no attention to the signs. Maybe a cost, in the form of a ticket, will save a life.

Mark Barritt, Glenwood Springs

Defend Second Amendment

When it comes to gun rights and the Second Amendment, let’s talk about facts, not feelings. Remember, this is about truth vs. lies, right vs. wrong, not Republican vs. Democrat.

Facts (all 2021 data): There are over 390 million privately owned guns in the U.S. with over 1 trillion rounds of ammo accompanying these guns; 81.4 million citizens own at least one gun; 42% are women; 58% are men. 

Since 2019, nearly 50% of all first-time gun buyers are women. Two-thirds of these owners list self-defense as their primary reason for ownership. Increasingly, minorities outpace nonminorities in gun ownership as a percentage of the population. To summarize, gun ownership by law-abiding citizens is growing, and in a very diverse way.

Those who want to take away your 2nd Amendment right have recently been defeated by Supreme Court rulings, but that doesn’t mean they are going to give up on their attempts to disarm law-abiding citizens. They will say that the Constitution was written when muskets were the only firearm in use and that modern guns are so much more advanced than the founding fathers could’ve imagined. 

Let me ask: What was the most advanced, highest capacity firearm available in the late 1700s? The musket! The Constitution doesn’t say “musket,” it says “arms.” Our Founders foresaw the need for us to progress with the times and be able to be armed in the same fashion as those that would seek to invade us or disarm us.

The anti-2A’s say that only law enforcement and military need to have certain kinds of guns and that we can rely on them to “protect” us. Would that be the same LE that handled the Uvalde shooting, the BLM/Antifa riots, or were the enforcers of the unconstitutional “pandemic” lockdowns? Or how about the military’s abandonment of Afghanistan, or the examples of Pol Pot and the former USSR?

We need to be our first line of defense. We cannot abdicate our responsibility of defense. With nearly 400 million guns and a trillion rounds of ammo in private hands, if we were the problem, believe me, they would know it. Defend our Second Amendment

Pedro Nevaja, Glenwood Springs