A dancing state of mind | PostIndependent.com

A dancing state of mind

Will Grandbois
will@postindependent.com

Dates

Friday, April 22nd @ 7:00pm

Saturday, April 23rd @ 7:00pm

Sunday, April 24th @ 2:00pm

Dancers Dancing is the culminating performance of a year of dance– a chance for Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts students from preschool through high school to show off what they’ve been working on.

“For a lot of these kids this is a tradition. It almost becomes a rite of passage.” said dance director Maurine Taufer. “The exuberance and enthusiasm of the students is really priceless. For some of them, this is what they do.”

The 24th annual performance will feature around 90 students plus half again as many guest performers under the theme of “A Night in New York.”

The theme was chosen due to the Big Apple’s role as an “undisputed capital of dance.”

“The best in modern dance, ballet, jazz dance, tap dance and hip hop can be found in New York, and all those genres will be presented in our show,” Taufer said. “It’s just such an exciting place to be… Hopefully we’re helping the audience and kids get a little taste of that.”

It’s all tied together as a trip along the subway, with stops along the way for different styles. The scene is brought to life by set designers Noemi and Krystof Kosmowski with lighting by Matt Soltesz, as well as costumer designer Crystal Shmidt and costume repurposer Tammy Girardo.

It even brings stage manager Brad Bailey back from Denver.

“We’re really proud of the many faces that make up Dancers Dancing,” Taufer said. “It couldn’t happen without a huge community of people.”

The dances themselves are choreographed by Taufer, Laura Bahr, Katie Deyoe, Bella Barnum-Collier, Emily Fifer and Christina Brusig. It will also incorporate parts of recent productions of “Seussical the Musical,” “Chorus Line” and “Anything Goes, and the Sunday matinee will even include some selections from the Center’s competitive numbers.

“There’s so much to see,” Taufer said. “Dancing is an incredible means of self expression that incorporates the physical, emotional, and spiritual.”

Freshman Tyndall Rounsefell agreed.

“If you have something happening in your life and you can’t necessarily talk to everyone around it, being able to dance is really helpful,” she said. “You get to pour out your emotion through your movement. You can tell a story without words.”

The variety of styles only enhances that opportunity.

Freshman Sophie Carnoali took ballet as a little girl but really fell in love with tap.

“It’s nice to still learn and get to explore the different types of dances,” she said. “If you just get in the mindset of the dance you’re in, it really helps… “It shows off all of our skills and it’s a lot of fun.”

For showing off, Brusig’s advanced jazz choreography is hard to beat.

“Being the coach of the competitive dance program, I’ve incorporated that in,” she said. “It’s more of an edgy, tricky, technical style of choreography.”

“It’s not just a dance recital. It’s a beautiful display of local talent,” she added. “It is just my wish that everyone in the community who loves art comes out to see this show, because it’s art in motion.”

It’s also an opportunity to get inspired for a creative outlet of your own. In addition to dance, the Center for the Arts has classes in piano, guitar, voice, pottery and more. Summer session starts June 6.

“We welcome new students of all ages, whether they’re interested in becoming slightly involved or extremely involved,” Taufer said.

The existing students are proof of how big an impact art can make.

“You see them grow so much,” said Deyoe, who teaches ballet, tap and jazz at several levels. “I think it’s going to be a really fun show this year. It’s a great community event. Come on out.”