Art Scene: Talking to the bees | PostIndependent.com

Art Scene: Talking to the bees

Christina Brusig
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James Cambos lives in Appalachia in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains, the eastern counterpart of the Rocky Mountains. “They combine a heritage of natural beauty and a distinctive regional culture.” James listens to the environment and understands that the cycle of nature is a road map for its occupants. He observed “as May matures into June, we move toward the zenith of the year, the summer solstice. The outdoor world begins to explode with life, butterflies, flying insects, and birds that add their magic to nature. Bees, the great pollinators of our Earth, are busy doing their job. In my region of the world, Appalachia, the old-timers believed in “talking to the bees” because they thought that bees are mystically linked to humans and are concerned with our lives.” Image that…concerned with our lives.

This cycle — plant a seed, pollinate a flower and create the environment to let it grow — is the cycle of the arts. Every season of education and inclusion creates a fertile ground to enrich a perennial student’s experience and usher in the new annual seedlings.

I could get pretty involved in symbols, but I’m also on the front line of actuals, and I constantly see the results of our community involvement, educational outreach impact and the creative architecture that we have built that is the Center for the Arts.

Magic of Music

Summer of Music is our perennial time of community and renewal, and this is Year 6 of the most popular musical event in the valley. Take a look at two more nights of the art of music when gifted musicians reach out across the footlights and take you into their magical world.

Frank Martin and Paper Bird — July 13

Frank Martin opens the night with his original music on the fiddle, mandolin, steel, bass and drums. Martin, legendary songwriter, slide guitar player and singer, brings the heart of country and bluegrass to the Summer of Music Concert #3 on Wednesday, July 13.

Then get ready for the indie folk and rock riffs of Paper Bird. Paper Bird is a six-piece band composed of three female lead vocals, guitar, bass and drums. Having three lead singers allows them to have rich multi-part vocal harmonies. The members of Paper Bird have always focused on the vocal harmonies of their music, which includes gospel, soul, rock and roll, shoe-gaze, African rhythms, indie pop, folk, R&B and jazz.

Poser and Andy Frasco & the U.N. — July 20

If you like the Beatles, Joe Cocker and Santana, let the six-piece cover band Poser knock your socks off with their spot-on covers of these rock legends Wednesday, July 20, at the Center for the Arts’ Summer of Music Concert #4.

And the Winner Is…

Our exciting summer classes begin next Monday, June 6, with a complete variety of art, music, pottery and dance. Visit glenwoodarts.org and enroll in a summer of fun.

Our newest faculty member, Meaghan Owens, is a recent graduate from the Institute for Hawaiian Music (IHM) at the University of Hawaii on the island of Maui and on Saturday, May 28, she won the “Best Hawaiian Music Compilation” award at the Hawaiian equivalent of the Grammy Awards. Meaghan is looking forward to sharing this knowledge with her students this summer at the Glenwood Arts Center in the Islander Summer Camp. Mahalo nui! (Big thanks!)

The Defiance Difference

We are proud to host the Defiance Theater 2016 Fundraiser at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 11, at the Art Center. Your support benefits the fall production and ongoing scholarship fund.

Be part of a silent auction and enjoy great food, beverages and a night of theatrical fun for just $25 at the door. Contact Brad Verheiller at 456-5296 and choirbears7@aol.com for more information.

Christina Brusig is the executive director of the Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts. She can be reached at christina@glenwoodarts.org.


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