Artist K Rhynus Cesark brings new installation to ArtShare Gallery | PostIndependent.com

Artist K Rhynus Cesark brings new installation to ArtShare Gallery

Jessica Cabe
jcabe@postindependent.com
Artist K Rhynus Cesark works on the installation for "Floating Compression," her exhibit at the CMC ArtShare Gallery at 802 Grand Ave. in Glenwood Springs. The opening reception is from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday.
Jessica Cabe / Post Independent |

If You Go...

Who: K Rhynus Cesark

What: “Floating Compression” artist’s reception

When: 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday (exhibition lasts through Jan. 4)

Where: CMC ArtShare Gallery in Glenwood Springs

How Much: Free

From today until Jan. 4, the walls of the Glenwood Springs CMC ArtShare Gallery will be covered with reimagined examples of an architectural concept: tensegrity, or tensional integrity. Tensegrity, a term coined by architect Buckminster Fuller, describes the use of components — usually bars — held in place by the tension created from taut cables. The bars do not touch each other this way, giving the impression that they’re floating.

“Floating Compression” is the title of artist K Rhynus Cesark’s exhibit, which plays on the concept of tensegrity both literally and metaphorically. Cesark’s porcelain-dipped pieces, such as branches, tumbleweeds and ceramic birds and houses, are often held up or connected by thread from her grandmother’s sewing collection.

Although looking at the installation, which Cesark created specifically for this exhibition, brings to mind the architectural work of Fuller and the sculptural work of his one-time student, Kenneth Snelson, Cesark said her work should stir in viewers a different interpretation of tensegrity.

“I am more interested in the interpretation that’s not literal or direct, but more metaphorical in relation to relationships and support — or lack thereof,” Cesark said.

The most striking part of the installation is an arrangement of small porcelain-dipped ceramic birds that perch on branches, on the top of the gallery walls or jut out from the walls themselves. Some of these birds are in positions for conversation, Cesark said, while others are placed so that conversation and interaction are literally impossible. Some of them face the wall, and some have their heads through the wall, symbolizing a lack of support that goes beyond the literal, physical realm that Fuller and Snelson explored.

Cesark said she draws inspiration from the support system of the home; she uses her grandmother’s thread intentionally. The titles of her work often reference sewing and gardening, implying that her art is influenced by the home and the earth. Dipping objects in porcelain creates a striking visual, especially when set against the white walls of the ArtShare Gallery. There is a cleanness to her work that turns the ordinary into something to look at twice.

“I love porcelain as a material,” Cesark said. “It’s so beautiful and soft. I’m in love with all the stages of working with porcelain.”

Cesark said she has been interested in art since childhood, when she would make and build things. Her mother studied art at Skidmore College, and she instilled an appreciation for art in Cesark by example. From high school to the present, Cesark learned to work with ceramics, glass, wood, welding and any other medium that would allow her to materialize a concept in her head. In addition to her porcelain-dipped objects, Cesark makes functional porcelain and tableware, she paints, does printmaking and more. Some of these other examples of her work will be on display at the ArtShare Gallery.

“I’m one of those artists that loves material, so whatever material I think suits an idea or a concept, I use that material,” she said. “I’m an opportunivore that way.”


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