Artist Spotlight: William Carlson and Cailin Anderson | PostIndependent.com

Artist Spotlight: William Carlson and Cailin Anderson

After being resurrected last year, the Glenwood Springs High School marching band will return to the field for a special homecoming performance tonight. The Post Independent caught up with senior musician William Carlson and section leader Cailin Anderson.

Did you listen to this kind of music before you played?

CA: Besides going to my brother and sister’s band concerts, not really. I was in the Glenwood Springs Percussion Ensemble from fourth grade to freshman year when the program kinda crumbled, so I’d been exposed to music and involved with music.

WC: I listen to some jazz, particularly from the early 1920s. It kind of has that drive that makes you want to dance to it. Recently, I’ve been hearing a lot of Trombone Shorty. I like classic rock from the ’50s through the ’70s.

What drew you to your instrument?

CA: My sister played flute when she was in middle school, so we just kinda had one lying around. At first, I hated it. I tried playing clarinet, but that was even worse. As I got better and better, I decided I was alright at it, and it was kind of cool. All my friends told me to stay with it, so I did.

WC: I originally played the trumpet, but with braces it was a struggle. The trombone mouthpiece is a little bit bigger. I now do a little bit of both. I like the sound of brass instruments.

Was there a point where you started to really like it?

CA: Probably eighth grade, because we got a good honor band. We got to play with the high-schoolers. That’s when it got on the bigger scale for me. I found out there were other kids that care like I do.

Has it been difficult to learn to march?

WC: I was taught the Air Force March since I’m in the Junior ROTC program here, but the spacing is completely different. Some of the commands are the same, but the movements are different. You also have to memorize your music. It’s a little bit of an adjustment.

What made you decide to be a leader in band?

CA: I’m such a people person. I love all of these kids. I have struggled with band, so I feel like they’re comfortable enough to talk to me because I’m not going to judge them. I think it’s an organic thing that happened, and me being a control freak helped.

Any other interests you’d like to share?

WC: I became a Boy Scout about sixth grade and earned about 38 merit badges. It’s a brotherhood. It develops our character and gives us leadership skills. It teaches you about your character. This troop has benefited me a lot throughout the years.

Are you excited to perform at homecoming?

CA: In percussion, we’d march in the parade, and it was the coolest thing ever. I’d always wanted a marching band, and now we finally have one. It’s not where some people want it to be, but it’s where it needs to be now. I’m so confident that in the next five or 10 years, it’s going to be like it was 30 years ago. Even just the growth from last year is crazy. We’re all still learning, so we do one show and we make it the best that we can.

What’s next for you?

WC: After high school I plan on joining the Air Force to become a pilot, maybe for a C-130. You don’t need a bachelor’s degree for that, plus commercial airliners don’t hire fighter pilots. The bigger aircraft are more similar to control.

CA: I’m thinking of going to Mesa so I can be in the band program, or maybe to Western for business administration so I can be a real estate agent. I’ll have to see where things take me.


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