Editor’s Picks | PostIndependent.com

Editor’s Picks

I’ve recently started taking lessons in a new art form: teaching.

The lessons are of the learn-by-doing variety.

I’ve been teaching the journalism class at Basalt High School and advising the high school newspaper, The Longhorn Roundup, since the end of August, and so far it’s been quite the reality check.

Graduates of good college journalism programs (like Syracuse University’s) probably know how to produce a newspaper from scratch. We learn everything from planning and writing articles, to taking photos and shooting and editing video, to laying out publications in Adobe InDesign, to creating websites.

The only thing I didn’t learn at Syracuse was the business side of newspapers, but I did work part-time at Macy’s during grad school. Selling Calvin Klein dresses that don’t qualify for coupons might be harder than selling newspaper ads.

(Okay, maybe I’m oversimplifying).

The point is, I had excellent training in journalism, so I thought teaching it would be a breeze. It turns out teaching is a whole other ballgame, though. You need an even deeper knowledge to teach than you do to do something yourself, and I’m realizing that creating a newspaper and explaining to 20 high school students how (and why) to create a newspaper are two very different beasts.

Luckily, the administrators and other teachers have been very supportive. I have a couple of mentor teachers assigned to teach me how to teach, thankfully. And I think I’m doing just fine so far, even if it isn’t as easy as I thought it might be.

The mind-blowing part is that I’m only responsible for one class. The amount of work that full-time teachers put into preparing children for life (yes, that’s really what they’re doing — nothing less) is almost incomprehensible.

So thank a teacher today, because the work they do is an art and a science, and unless they’re being told on a daily basis that they’re heroes, they’re not getting the recognition they deserve.

Friday

The New Ute Events Center in Rifle brings back its popular Five Comedians for $5 night. You’ll pay more to sit in a theater and watch a movie than you will to witness great stand-up from Gail Mason, Josh Disney, Tobias Livingston, Preston Tompkins and David Rodriguez. Beer and wine will be served to guests who are 21 or older, and doors open at 7:30 p.m. for an 8 p.m. show. Tickets will be available at the door beginning at 6 p.m.

Saturday

If you’re looking for more live entertainment, hit up the Glenwood Vaudeville Revue for its last show of the summer. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and food and drinks are available as soon as you take your seat. Or, just sit back and enjoy the show for the price of admission: $24 for adults, $22 for seniors and $16 for kids 12 and younger. Take 10 percent off groups of 10 or more. For reservations, call 970-945-9699 or visit http://www.gvrshow.com.

Sunday

Support essential programs at both Glenwood Springs and Sopris elementary schools by participating in the Fur and Feathers 5K Family Fun Run. The first annual event aims to raise fund for essential programs and needed supplies and technology at both schools while encouraging a healthy lifestyle. Registration opens at 8 a.m. with the race starting at 9 a.m. on the front lawn of Sopris Elementary School. Light refreshments will be served. The race will end on the athletic field of Glenwood Springs Elementary School. The entry fees are $30 for adults, $15 for kids and $70 for families up to four. Email gsespta81601@gmail.com for more information, or register early at http://www.active.com.

Jessica Cabe would like to acknowledge all her teacher friends for being super-human. She can be reached at jcabe@postindependent.com.


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