Palisade International Honeybee Festival April 10-11 | PostIndependent.com

Palisade International Honeybee Festival April 10-11

Brittany Markert
bmarkert@gjfreepress.com
Palisade International Honeybee Festival will hold a costume contest for adults, children and dogs this year. The event will also feature presentations, vendors and more.
Submitted photo |

GO&DO

WHAT: Palisade International Honeybee Festival

WHEN: Friday and Saturday, April 10-11

WHERE: Downtown Palisade

COST: Free

INFO: www.palisadehoneybeefest.org

Spring has sprung and that means it’s time for the seventh annual Palisade International Honeybee Festival.

“The reason we started seven years ago was to draw attention to the importance of honeybees in the agricultural community,” said Jean Tally, event organizer.

The event kicks off on Friday, April 10, from 5-8 p.m. at Blue Pig Gallery (1101 W. Third St., Palisade) with a reception filled with honeybee-themed art, hors d’oeuvres and mead from Meadery of the Rockies. The event is free and open to the public.

Saturday, April 11, is the main event, which includes food, entertainment, educational presentations, and vendors from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is also free and open to the public. A costume contest will be held throughout the day for the best dressed adult, child and dog.

Vendors will line Town Plaza, too, which is located at the corner of W. Third and Main streets in downtown Palisade. A spelling bee for third graders will take place at 11 a.m. on the plaza as well.

Educational presentations include Dan Bean, who is the director of the Palisade Insectary. He will talk at 2 p.m. about “good bugs” that benefit the food chain and environment. Presentations are set for Palisade Library Branch Courtyard (119 W. Third St.). They are open and free to the public.

Meadery of the Rockies (3701 G Road) will host tours of the meadery and teach how “honey wine” is made. Tours will take place between noon and 3 p.m.

Dixie Bermeister will additionally host cooking demonstrations with Western Colorado Community College.

HONEYBEE FACTS

Honeybees produce honey, and they act as pollinators for important crops like cherries, apricots, some varieties of peaches and apples.

According to Bob Hammon, Colorado State University Extension’s western Colorado entomology expert, honeybees are considered exotic to the area. Native bees include 10 species of bumblebees, mason bees and lead cutter bees.

“If it wasn’t for the native bees, the Grand Valley wouldn’t have most native plants,” Hammon said.

For more information, visit http://www.palisadehoneybeefest.org.


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