Parent-daughter duos take the stage at Glenwood Vaudeville Revue | PostIndependent.com

Parent-daughter duos take the stage at Glenwood Vaudeville Revue

Carla Jean Whitley
cj@postindependent.com

If you go

Glenwood Vaudeville Revue

Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m.; Sundays, 5 p.m. through Sept. 3. Doors open for food and drinks, with entertainment beginning immediately thereafter.

915 Grand Ave., Glenwood Springs | $24 adults, $22 seniors; $16 children 2-12 | 945-9699 | gvrshow.com

Danielle Erickson made her first stage appearance as an infant strapped to her father’s chest. Tom Erickson recalls dancing across the stage in rehearsals at Aspen’s Crystal Palace with his daughter in a baby carrier.

Becca Maniscalchi’s exposure came even earlier: Mom Julie Maniscalchi performed with Becca in the womb.

This summer the young women have joined their parents on stage in a more conventional manner: as fellow performers in the Glenwood Vaudeville Revue’s summer show. It’s the first time Becca and Julie have shared a stage, and a repeat experience for the Ericksons.

“It’s been really fun being on stage with Mom,” Becca said. “I have so many other jobs and rarely get to see her at home.”

It’s also a near-familial experience for the daughters, who grew up running around theaters and in shows together. They’ve spent recent years apart; Becca will soon enter her junior year as a dance major at the University of Wyoming, and Danielle recently completed five years studying theater at Denver School of the Arts. In the fall, she’ll study biochemical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines, where she’ll be a freshman.

Tom and Julie have performed together for nearly 25 years, and more than 860 shows at the Vaudeville. Julie said he’s like a brother. She comes from a large family in which she was the shy one — which she admitted is hard to believe when you see her on stage. Theater drew her out of her shell, though.

And as the younger Erickson and Maniscalchi have made their way around the Vaudeville, they’ve also developed new skills. Becca worked in the theater’s office for four years before stepping on stage. It’s Danielle’s first service job; the show’s performers wait tables between acts. The experience has been valuable, although the women may apply their experiences differently.

They’re on different career paths: Danielle hopes to put her engineering degree to use, and Becca intends to dance on cruise lines or Broadway (“I’m running away from the money. I just want to dance,” Becca said with a laugh). But the girls have embraced the summer show as a bonding experience with their respective parents. Becca and Julie crank up music and sing along on their drives home from work. Tom and Danielle commute to and from Aspen, which allows for quality time they missed out on during her years in Denver. Regardless of what happens on or off stage, the pairs said they’re grateful for the fun and laughter.

Tom said, “We all get kind of giddy.”