Car theft, meth in the courthouse, and a Rifle fight: Garfield County crime briefs | PostIndependent.com
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Car theft, meth in the courthouse, and a Rifle fight: Garfield County crime briefs

Car ride turns into auto theft

A man approached a Garfield County Sheriff’s deputy while he was fueling his patrol car in Battlement Mesa.

The man told the sheriff’s deputy “he had gone in to get a drink and the two girls he had given a ride to had stolen his car,” according to a probable cause arrest warrant.

The sheriff asked the man to wait in the store while he finished fueling up. The man came back a bit later and said he found the car, and didn’t need help.

About 40 minutes later, around 10 a.m. Feb. 24, the man called dispatch, and reported the vehicle, which belonged to his boss, as stolen.

The driver told the deputy he had given a ride to his friend’s girlfriend and another woman. The girlfriend, who is 36, was in a custody battle with his friend.

The driver said he left his phone, wallet and cell phone in the car and entered with one of the girls. But she said she left something in the car, and left the store. A few minutes later, he told the deputy, he realized the car was gone.

The woman was arrested Feb. 26 and faces charges of aggravated motor vehicle theft, a class-five felony, and two misdemeanor theft charges.

Two arrested after fight outside a Rifle bar

Rifle Police officers on foot patrol heard shouting around the 200 block of East Third Street downtown around 1 a.m. Sunday.

They heard a man shout, “do you want to get stabbed?” repeatedly, and the sound of scuffling, according to a probable cause document.

The officers approached the group of three men, who ran when they saw the cops’ flashlights.

One officer recognized one of the men from previous encounters, and believed he was the one shouting about stabbing. The officer recalled the man, who is 21, had a large folding knife.

With help of a Garfield County Sheriff’s deputy, the police caught up with the man, and called an ambulance because he was “bleeding severely from his head,” the police officer wrote in the affidavit.

Witnesses at a bar where the men had been told police that the suspect had been drunk and obnoxious, had threatened to slap a girl and made vulgar statements before getting kicked out.

Another man, 26, who took off running was also caught by police and questioned.

He said the 21-year-old had threatened to stab him, but he denied being in a fight. The officers seized his clothes at the hospital, because there appeared to be fresh blood on his pants.

He was arrested and charged with assault in the heat of passion, a class 6 felony.

The man with the knife received several staples to his head, and had several broken teeth. He was arrested and charged with menacing with a knife, a class 5 felony.

Both men were charged with obstruction.

Man arrested with meth in pocket, lies about it

Glenwood Springs police arrested a man on a misdemeanor warrant Feb. 20 at the Garfield County Courthouse.

Police had been advised that the suspect, a 23 year old man, was at the courthouse to meet with pretrial services, and they arrested him there.

On the short walk to the Garfield County Jail, police told the man that if he had anything illegal on him, and brought it into the jail, he would face additional charges.

The man said “that he had nothing illegal in his possession,” the officer wrote in a probable cause document.

But when the Garfield County Sheriff’s Deputy at the jail took the suspect’s belongings, they found a glassy shard inside a plastic bag, weighing .5 grams. The shard later tested positive for methamphetamine.

The officers also found two dozen pills in his shorts, some used to treat overdose and narcotic addiction, others used as prescription sedatives.

He was charged with possession of methamphetamine, a drug felony, and introducing contraband.

tphippen@postindependent.com


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