Colorado Democrat Michael Bennet reelected to US Senate | PostIndependent.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Colorado Democrat Michael Bennet reelected to US Senate

By NICHOLAS RICCARDI
Associated Press
Sen. Michael Bennet speaks with local officials and community members at the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act (CORE) event held at the Fales Ranch south of Carbondale on Wednesday afternoon.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

DENVER (AP) — Democrat Michael Bennet won reelection to the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, besting Republican businessman and first-time challenger Joe O’Dea.

Bennet won his third race on his pledge to protect abortion rights, an indication of how important the issue is to the blue-leaning state of Colorado. O’Dea was the rare Republican to support Roe v. Wade, the landmark abortion rights ruling that conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court overturned this summer. But that didn’t help him.

Bennet’s campaign hammered O’Dea on his opposition to abortions late in a pregnancy and on his support for the very GOP-appointed justices who overturned Roe.



Bennet and his backers dramatically outspent the novice candidate on the airwaves, while O’Dea only got rhetorical support from Senate Republicans in Washington, who never sent significant financial resources his way.

O’Dea tried to position himself as a future “Republican Joe Manchin,” referring to the conservative Democratic West Virginian senator as an example of a nonpartisan dealmaker who could end Washington gridlock. The son of a police officer, O’Dea said crime and the economy were his main concerns, not social issues. He had voted twice for Donald Trump, but O’Dea said he’d campaign against the former president in the 2024 GOP primary, citing better options like South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.



Colorado voters didn’t buy it these midterms, cementing the state’s transformation from a competitive swing state early in the century to a more reliably Democratic one. Only one Republican, Cory Gardner, has won a federal race in Colorado since 2004, and voters ousted him from the Senate in 2020.

About 7 in 10 Colorado voters say things in the country are heading in the wrong direction, according to AP VoteCast, an expansive survey of more than 2,700 voters in the state.

About three-quarters of voters say the condition of the economy is either not so good or poor, the survey found, compared with about a quarter who call it excellent or good. About a third say their family is falling behind financially.

In deciding how to vote in Colorado’s U.S. Senate race, a vast majority — 9 in 10 — say party control of the chamber is a factor in their vote, and about half of voters say it is the single most important factor.

The Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade also played a role in most voters’ decisions, with about 8 in 10 calling it a factor in how they cast their ballot. About a quarter call the court’s overturning of Roe the single most important factor in their vote.


Associated Press writer Sarah Rankin in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.



Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Glenwood Springs and Garfield County make the Post Independent’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.