Craig visitors have historic ghostly encounters | PostIndependent.com

Craig visitors have historic ghostly encounters

Craig Daily Press
Craig City Councilman Brian MacKenzie
Craig City Councilman Brian MacKenzie plays the part of H. B. Kobey Saturday, May 11.
Clay Thorp/Craig Press

Three historic 20th Century Craig residents took a trip in time to educate and entertain visitors during the Craig Historic Mini Ghost Walk Saturday, May 11.

Three historic 20th Century Craig residents took a trip in time to educate and entertain visitors during the Craig Historic Mini Ghost Walk Saturday, May 11.

“I look around and things sure have changed since I lived here in 1910 to 1925,” Debbie McLain said dressed in a timely costume, leaning on wooden crutches, playing the part of “Craig’s Best Loved Resident” Joseph R. Flack at the Museum of Northwest Colorado. 

“How time flies,” she said.

The Craig Historic Ghost Walk is one of Craig’s newest attractions. The very first walk kicked off in October 2018.

Ghost Walk creator and organizer Linda Olson said she fell in love with the idea of a Ghost Walk event when she lived elsewhere in Colorado.

“We used to live in Pueblo and we went every year to the Ghost Walk,” Olson said. “It was the history of Pueblo and we just loved it.”

Prior to retirement in Craig, Olson said she found herself researching historic Moffat County residents during downtime on the job.

“I had way too much time on my hands,” she said with a laugh.

Through her research, Olson learned about the lives of past residents and began writing first-person accounts as if she were the historic residents.

“So when I left that job, my husband said, ‘Well, you go do it girl,’” she said. “So we got it together, but I couldn’t have done it without all of the volunteer actors — all I do is organize it.”

Amid the hustle and bustle of downtown Saturday, Ghost Walk organizers used Alice Pleasant Park and the museum as backdrops for four free performances. 

Craig City Councilman Brian MacKenzie, dressed in a bow tie and feathered hat to convey rural 1918 attire, played the part of H. B. Kobey.

“I put Moffat County on the map,” MacKenzie said in character. “I’m exaggerating just a little bit, but I did play a major part in putting Moffat County on the lips of thousands of Coloradans across the state.”

Just outside the museum, MacKenzie told the history of Moffat County’s first fair and the county’s first Colorado State Fair wins. 

“With all the obstacles, the county fair was a success,” he said. “We, as a community, came together and pulled together a county fair in 30 days.”

Back at the park, Molly Kleeman, dressed as Mrs. W.F. Teagarden, detailed her husband’s influence in making Craig what it is today. 

“Mr. Teagarden secured rights to over 300 acres of land, he went to Denver and found investors, one of which was Reverend Craig,” she said. 

Teagarden, along with others, formed the Craig Land & Mercantile Company, built the first building in Craig, and was influential in securing the right of way to bring the railroad to Craig.

After her afternoon performance, a visitor approached Kleeman, touching her on the arm to get her attention, and thanked her.

“Everybody has been really great,” Kleeman said.

The miniature version of the presentation was a small taste of what is to come in October.

The Ghost Walk will return Thursday, Oct. 3, through Sunday, Oct. 5, with performances by the historic David Moffat, Augusta Wallahan, and seven other well-known characters.

Olson and organizers are actively recruiting volunteers and actors for the full performance this fall.

Proceeds from the Craig Historic Ghost Walk in October will go to support local museums and Colorado Northwestern Community College scholarships.


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