Dec. 31 last day | PostIndependent.com
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Dec. 31 last day

A thin blanket of snow now covers much of the land burned by the Coal Seam Fire, but many who were victimized by its fury just more than six months ago still need help. And with Christmas just around the corner, the time to donate money for those victims could be now.

Glenwood Springs city clerk Robin Clemons said the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund account will be closing on Dec. 31. All money in that fund will be distributed to victims sometime in early January.

“In August, we distributed $31,200,” Clemons said.



That money was distributed among 26 victims of the fire.

Since August, more than $15,000 has been collected and will be distributed in a similar fashion.



To donate money to the fund, donors can pay a visit to Mesa National Bank, WestStar Bank, the Bank of Colorado, U.S. Bank and Wells Fargo Bank and ask about the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund.

Around one-third of the $15,000 now in the Coal Seam fund was collected by folks from the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

On Nov. 25, members of the Thrivent Lutheran Brotherhood Branch 8705 and the Helping Hands group from the church presented a $5,000 check to Clemons, on behalf of the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund Committee.

“The church held a fund-raiser – the Harvest Festival,” Good Shepherd Lutheran Church office manager Susan Lau said.

The festival was organized and run by the Helping Hands group on Oct. 5. The group is comprised of around 15 ladies from the church, some of whom are in their 80s, Lau said.

“They’re extraordinarily modest, but they’re amazing,” Lau said.

Sally Thompson, the secretary of Helping Hands, said members of the group work all year sewing quilts and creating other crafts to be sold at the Harvest Festival each fall.

“We do all kinds of hand work,” she said. “Luckily it’s become pretty popular.”

A charity or group of charities that’s chosen each year by Helping Hands receives the proceeds from the festival. This year, the organization found it fitting to give the money to victims of the fire.

“We’ve done a lot of things in the community and we feel good about it,” Thompson said.

She also said that the handful of elderly women in Helping Hands serve as an inspiration for the others in the group.

“That shows you can be a vital part of the community when you’re in your 80s,” Thompson said. By greg masse

Post Independent Staff

A thin blanket of snow now covers much of the land burned by the Coal Seam Fire, but many who were victimized by its fury just more than six months ago still need help. And with Christmas just around the corner, the time to donate money for those victims could be now.

Glenwood Springs city clerk Robin Clemons said the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund account will be closing on Dec. 31. All money in that fund will be distributed to victims sometime in early January.

“In August, we distributed $31,200,” Clemons said.

That money was distributed among 26 victims of the fire.

Since August, more than $15,000 has been collected and will be distributed in a similar fashion.

To donate money to the fund, donors can pay a visit to Mesa National Bank, WestStar Bank, the Bank of Colorado, U.S. Bank and Wells Fargo Bank and ask about the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund.

Around one-third of the $15,000 now in the Coal Seam fund was collected by folks from the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

On Nov. 25, members of the Thrivent Lutheran Brotherhood Branch 8705 and the Helping Hands group from the church presented a $5,000 check to Clemons, on behalf of the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund Committee.

“The church held a fund-raiser – the Harvest Festival,” Good Shepherd Lutheran Church office manager Susan Lau said.

The festival was organized and run by the Helping Hands group on Oct. 5. The group is comprised of around 15 ladies from the church, some of whom are in their 80s, Lau said.

“They’re extraordinarily modest, but they’re amazing,” Lau said.

Sally Thompson, the secretary of Helping Hands, said members of the group work all year sewing quilts and creating other crafts to be sold at the Harvest Festival each fall.

“We do all kinds of hand work,” she said. “Luckily it’s become pretty popular.”

A charity or group of charities that’s chosen each year by Helping Hands receives the proceeds from the festival. This year, the organization found it fitting to give the money to victims of the fire.

“We’ve done a lot of things in the community and we feel good about it,” Thompson said.

She also said that the handful of elderly women in Helping Hands serve as an inspiration for the others in the group.

“That shows you can be a vital part of the community when you’re in your 80s,” Thompson said. By greg masse

Post Independent Staff

A thin blanket of snow now covers much of the land burned by the Coal Seam Fire, but many who were victimized by its fury just more than six months ago still need help. And with Christmas just around the corner, the time to donate money for those victims could be now.

Glenwood Springs city clerk Robin Clemons said the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund account will be closing on Dec. 31. All money in that fund will be distributed to victims sometime in early January.

“In August, we distributed $31,200,” Clemons said.

That money was distributed among 26 victims of the fire.

Since August, more than $15,000 has been collected and will be distributed in a similar fashion.

To donate money to the fund, donors can pay a visit to Mesa National Bank, WestStar Bank, the Bank of Colorado, U.S. Bank and Wells Fargo Bank and ask about the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund.

Around one-third of the $15,000 now in the Coal Seam fund was collected by folks from the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

On Nov. 25, members of the Thrivent Lutheran Brotherhood Branch 8705 and the Helping Hands group from the church presented a $5,000 check to Clemons, on behalf of the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund Committee.

“The church held a fund-raiser – the Harvest Festival,” Good Shepherd Lutheran Church office manager Susan Lau said.

The festival was organized and run by the Helping Hands group on Oct. 5. The group is comprised of around 15 ladies from the church, some of whom are in their 80s, Lau said.

“They’re extraordinarily modest, but they’re amazing,” Lau said.

Sally Thompson, the secretary of Helping Hands, said members of the group work all year sewing quilts and creating other crafts to be sold at the Harvest Festival each fall.

“We do all kinds of hand work,” she said. “Luckily it’s become pretty popular.”

A charity or group of charities that’s chosen each year by Helping Hands receives the proceeds from the festival. This year, the organization found it fitting to give the money to victims of the fire.

“We’ve done a lot of things in the community and we feel good about it,” Thompson said.

She also said that the handful of elderly women in Helping Hands serve as an inspiration for the others in the group.

“That shows you can be a vital part of the community when you’re in your 80s,” Thompson said. By greg masse

Post Independent Staff

A thin blanket of snow now covers much of the land burned by the Coal Seam Fire, but many who were victimized by its fury just more than six months ago still need help. And with Christmas just around the corner, the time to donate money for those victims could be now.

Glenwood Springs city clerk Robin Clemons said the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund account will be closing on Dec. 31. All money in that fund will be distributed to victims sometime in early January.

“In August, we distributed $31,200,” Clemons said.

That money was distributed among 26 victims of the fire.

Since August, more than $15,000 has been collected and will be distributed in a similar fashion.

To donate money to the fund, donors can pay a visit to Mesa National Bank, WestStar Bank, the Bank of Colorado, U.S. Bank and Wells Fargo Bank and ask about the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund.

Around one-third of the $15,000 now in the Coal Seam fund was collected by folks from the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church.

On Nov. 25, members of the Thrivent Lutheran Brotherhood Branch 8705 and the Helping Hands group from the church presented a $5,000 check to Clemons, on behalf of the Coal Seam Fire Relief Fund Committee.

“The church held a fund-raiser – the Harvest Festival,” Good Shepherd Lutheran Church office manager Susan Lau said.

The festival was organized and run by the Helping Hands group on Oct. 5. The group is comprised of around 15 ladies from the church, some of whom are in their 80s, Lau said.

“They’re extraordinarily modest, but they’re amazing,” Lau said.

Sally Thompson, the secretary of Helping Hands, said members of the group work all year sewing quilts and creating other crafts to be sold at the Harvest Festival each fall.

“We do all kinds of hand work,” she said. “Luckily it’s become pretty popular.”

A charity or group of charities that’s chosen each year by Helping Hands receives the proceeds from the festival. This year, the organization found it fitting to give the money to victims of the fire.

“We’ve done a lot of things in the community and we feel good about it,” Thompson said.

She also said that the handful of elderly women in Helping Hands serve as an inspiration for the others in the group.

“That shows you can be a vital part of the community when you’re in your 80s,” Thompson said.


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