Device could test perceptions about speeding | PostIndependent.com

Device could test perceptions about speeding

Dennis WebbPost Independent Staff

New city engineer Mike McDill is looking into buying a device that would help bring him and other city officials up to speed on how much motorists speed in Glenwood Springs.McDill said the city is considering buying a device that is placed on a road and records not just traffic counts, but speeds.The device is inexpensive and could be helpful as the city tries to address traffic issues, McDill said.”Most of our traffic problems are a matter of individuals’ perceptions. It would be nice to collect some real data to make decisions on,” he said.For example, the city needs to document how much of a speeding problem actually exists on Midland Avenue, McDill said.Midland residents long have complained about speeders. McDill, who became Glenwood’s city engineer earlier this year, travels Midland every day. He said he drives the 25-mph speed limit and people don’t back up behind him.Between the limitations on speed created by the road’s curves, driveways and street intersections, people may go faster than 25, “but I’m not thinking it’s 40 or 45,” he said.”I’ve not experienced anybody just busting by me or anything like that in the opposite direction,” he said.Part of the credit may go to the planters placed in the center of Midland late last year in an attempt to reduce speeds, he said.McDill said the speed tracking device consists of a metal plate taped on the pavement. It can even differentiate between trucks and cars, he said.He said when he worked in Wyoming, officials used one of the devices on a county road in an isolated area, and the data showed a ” a rush of drivers coming down the road at 80 miles per hour” whenever the shift ended at a local coal mine.


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