Downtown Glenwoods antique and classic car show | PostIndependent.com

Downtown Glenwoods antique and classic car show

Kim Doose

Juston Myers paid $1 for his 1936 Ford. The story behind the pickup, which now could be worth as much as $20,000, was just one of many told by car enthusiasts on Saturday at the second annual antique and classic car show in Glenwood.The Downtown Development Association, Little Bears Antique Mall and the Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association held the event at Centennial Park at Ninth Street and Grand Avenue.Myers, who was 15 at the time and ready to get his license, found the pickup in a Utah field 16 years ago.The owner, who was a family friend, wanted $1,000 for it, but decided to make a deal with Myers.If Myers put $1 down and promised to get an education or learn a trade, he would never have to pay the rest of the money.Juston became an upholsterer and has driven the truck ever since.Misty Stuart also drives her first car, a red convertible 1965 Chevy Corvair which her father bought for her. After he died 10 years ago, the car became even more special.Bart Victor, who had eight cars in the show and owns 40 classic cars total, holds cruise nights at the Charcoal Burger Drive-In, which he owns.Its fun to bring back the 50s, he said.The drive-in is a popular spot for people to bring their cars, pop their hoods and take a cruise with other car lovers.Weve got some very class act cars in the valley, said Bob DeHerrera.Its art. Its the passion we put into it. We make something out of nothing, he said as he looked around the show and estimated 40 cars whose combined worth easily totaled more than $1.5 million.Shoppers who wanted to buy something unique came to the antique show which featured more than a dozen local vendors.According to dealers, Glenwood is a great place to buy antiques due to the towns key location between Aspen and Vail.Great pieces from different people come our way, said Harvey Gilmore, who co-organized the event and owns Little Bears Antiques, the 16,000-square-foot antique mall south of town.Saturdays show appeared to bring a steady stream of people into the downtown core as shoppers participated in a treasure hunt at local stores.Everyone around it benefits, Gilmore said. I think creating events like this makes our town more vibrant. Keeping it vibrant is important.

From left, Brittany Smith, 14; Greg James, a pressman at Gran Farnum; Joslin James, 14; Vince James, co-owner of VinMar Drywall; and Michelle James, co-owner of Vicki Lee Green Realtors. They all live in New Castle.

Juston Myers, of Glenwood, owns JTs Upholstery, and Traci Myers owns Tracis Home Daycare. The couple drove their 1936 Ford pickup to the show.

Tim Holliday, of Carbondale, is a building inspector for Garfield County, and Vonda Williams is a medical assistant. Their 1969 Ford Mustang won both the Ladies Choice and Participants Choice awards.

Bart Victor, of Glenwood, who helped organize the show, owns the Charcoal Burger Drive-In. Hes shown here in his 1969 Chevy II Nova.

Bill Burton, of Carbondale, is a developer and builder. He said his 1976 Cadillac El Dorado rides like a dream.

Schy French, of Carbondale, works at the NAPA Store. He drove his 1967 Chevy Nova to the show.

Cliff Herrington, of Silt, sits in his 1962 Ford Ranchero. He said the best thing about the truck is the time he spent working on it with his son.

From left, Misty and Jack Stuart, of New Castle, own A&H Graphics and drove Mistys red 1965 convertible Chevy Corvair to the show.


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