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Following is a preview of tomorrow’s headlines

Bert Dahlander lives, plays, and paints by Duke Ellingtons lyrics, It dont mean a thing if you aint got that swing.Playing a toe-tapping song on his snare drum on a whim, while wrapping up his garage sale in Battlement Mesa, the world-renowned Swedish-born jazz musician and painter shows that swing is still in his heart. He is selling most of his belongings, including hundreds of his vibrant, music-inspired paintings, to move to Mesquite, Nev., after an international cruise ship music tour this summer.My father bought me a snare drum with a calf skin head when I was 8 or 9 years old. I was collecting stamps so I sold the stamps to uy a high hat, said Dahlander, who will be 77 Friday. I left Sweden in 1954 because when I heard this music jazz I said I have to be there.From Sweden Dahlander arrived in New York City, where he soon learned that the Mafia controlled the live music club scene.No one could play in New York City without staying there for six months and paying, said Dahlander, who has lived in Colorado for 35 years. Norman Grant, the great promoter of jazz at the time, wanted me to come to Los Angeles. I took a Greyhound bus and stopped in Chicago at a club called The Beehive, which everybody said at the time was the most famous club in America.

When the Roaring Fork School District board of education meets Wednesday night theyll get a glance at the future and a look at the past.The glance to the future comes in the form of a design by LKA Partners for the new Roaring Fork High School on the North Face site.It is really a unique and exciting building, said principal Wendy Moore.The design uses the idea of classroom neighborhoods, in which classrooms are clustered together by subject, grade level or some other criteria, she said. In the center of each neighborhood is a place for students and teachers to gather, she said. The library is located in the center of the building and most of the building will have Mount Sopris views, she said. The board of education will also likely approve the schematic design for the Basalt Middle School remodel and addition by Bennett Wagner & Grody architects.But all that activity comes after the board shares a few rootbeer floats with some of the districts best and brightest. The board is hosting an academic awards presentation for student groups that placed in at least the top three in state competitions. This year, the list is long, with honorees from teams throughout the district, including: Mock Trial, Future Business Leaders of America, Health Occupations Students of America, DECA, Speech and Debate, and elementary spelling bee winners.The academic awards presentation begins at 5 p.m.

Four thousand years ago, a volcano erupted and left a mark thats barely visible today. But the Dotsero volcano, now a pile of ash and reddened soil on the east end of Glenwood Canyon north of Interstate 70 and the Eagle River, has appeared on the radar screen of the U.S. Geological Survey, which recently rated the threats of volcanoes across the country.This is the first comprehensive report on volcanoes since Mount St. Helens erupted 25 years ago, said Clarice Ransom, spokesman for the USGS in Reston, Va.Dotsero is rated as a moderate threat for its potential to throw volcanic ash into the air at such altitudes that it could disrupt airplane traffic. Sunset Crater in Arizona is also a moderate threat.Where you sit in Colorado, that part of the U.S. is heavily trafficked by jet airplanes, said Jim Quick, USGS program coordinator for volcanic hazards. If Dotsero should erupt with an explosive event, it would put ash up to flight altitudes and threaten aircraft.Quick explained that the USGS evaluated volcanoes in the United States as well as its territories, and scientists believe any volcano that has erupted in the last 10,000 years, during the geologic Holocene Era, could become active again.


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