Gas engines still too loud for local | PostIndependent.com
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Gas engines still too loud for local

Despite an award bestowed on a local oil and gas operator in Parachute for noise mitigation, a nearby landowner says heavy vibrations and noise still affect him because of the company’s compressor engines running less than a mile from his property.Williams Production RMT Company was recognized with a Noise Impact Mitigation Award by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission at the annual Operator Awards earlier this month.But Sid Lindauer, who lives a little over half a mile north of Parachute, said he and his wife, Ruth, have suffered for two years from the noise put out by the compressor engines, which include a low rumble and vibrations.”That’s far too much time for humans to be subjected to noise from compressors,” Lindauer reported at a Northwest Colorado Oil and Gas Forum Thursday at the Garfield County Fairgrounds. “During the evenings, nights and weekends is when we have a problem.”However, the COGCC awarded Williams Production for going above and beyond the commission’s rules and regulations by installing sound walls directly in front of the compressor engine cooling fans as well as putting in six cooler inlet silencers.”The COGCC considered that to be a major step in reducing the noise above and beyond what (the commission) requires,” said Brian Macke, acting director for the COGCC.After the mitigation efforts, measurements from the compressors were found to be in compliance under the COGCC rules, which limit noise decibels in residential areas to no more than 55 during the day and 50 decibels at night.Lindauer says the company’s attempts at mitigating the noise have helped but are still unsatisfactory.”It’s working a lot better than anything else they’ve done, but it’s still bad,” Lindauer said. “This is a major natural gas compressor facility now. We believe the (COGCC) rule should not apply to large compressor stations.”When asked what he thought the answer to the problem might be, Lindauer had his own ideas.”Maybe if they build a dirt berm or modify the existing sound walls, raising the light or increasing the sound-absorbing material,” he suggested. “Neither the COGCC or (Garfield) county will stand up and admit the rules are outdated and don’t apply nowadays. It’s a disaster.”But Macke said the Lindauer’s noise problem has been resolved, according to the COGCC.”There’s been a resolution as far as we’re concerned,” Macke said. “The noise levels have been measured and we consider Williams to be in compliance, although we will continue to monitor noise complaints.””There’s been a resolution as far as we’re concerned,” Macke said. “The noise levels have been measured and we consider Williams to be in compliance, although we will continue to monitor noise complaints.”


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