Interior Dept. removes Bald Eagle from list of threatened species | PostIndependent.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Interior Dept. removes Bald Eagle from list of threatened species

H. JOSEF HEBERT
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) ” The government took the American bald eagle off the endangered species list Thursday ” an official name-dropping that President Bush hailed as “a wonderful way” to celebrate the Fourth of July.

Bush said the bald eagle’s resurgence after a four-decade-old fight should be credited to cooperation between private landowners and federal and state governments. “This great conservation achievement means more and more Americans across the nation will enjoy the thrill of seeing bald eagles soar,” he said.

Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne, making the formal announcement at the Jefferson Memorial, said: “Today I am proud to announce the eagle has returned.”



His department made the recovery official by removing the eagle from the list of threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The bird had been reclassified from endangered to threatened in 1995.

Today there are nearly 10,000 bald eagles in the contiguous 48 states, compared to a documented 417 in 1963 when the bird was on the verge of extinction everywhere except in Alaska and Canada where it has continued to thrive.



“After years of careful study, public comment and planning, the Department of Interior and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are confident in the future security of the American bald eagle,” said Kempthorne.

He promised that “from this point forward we will work to ensure that the eagle never again needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act.”

The eagle, whose decline came during years in which the bird was often targeted by hunters and later became a victim of the pesticide DDT, will still be protected by state statutes and a federal law passed by Congress in 1940 that makes it illegal to kill a bald eagle.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is developing guidelines on how that law will be implemented. It also is developing a permitting system to allow landowners to develop their property and still protect the eagle population.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Glenwood Springs and Garfield County make the Post Independent’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


News

Report: Estimates of future Upper Colorado River Basin water use confound previous planning

A report released this month by the Center for Colorado River Studies says that in order to sustainably manage the river in the face of climate change, officials need alternative management paradigms and a different way of thinking compared with the status quo. Estimates about how much water the Upper Colorado River Basin states will use in the future are a problem that needs rethinking, according to the white paper.



See more