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Letters

Dear Editor,

The Garfield County Commissioners should take the Brian Huster Petition for Disconnection for the Crystal River Marketplace so he can save money over the next six years by simply raising hay, with much fear, uncertainty, doubt and skepticism.

Here is why. Mr. Huster claims that he’ll save $2,700 per year by disconnecting from the town of Carbondale and just growing hay on his Marketplace acreage, while not developing that land over the next six years (by state statute). That will be a $16,203 savings for him.



The same week he filed for disconnect, he also filed for a demolition permit for two houses and two buildings (a shop and one used for storage). Those demolition and contractor permits will cost him just over $30,000. Well, that is a net loss of over $14,000 and a net property de-valuation and a net holdings depreciation. Strangely, these properties are apparently still in use.

So, something funny is going here, and Mr. Huster isn’t being honest or truthful with the town of Carbondale or the Garfield County Commissioners about his short-term or long-term (six-year) plans for either hay fields or Marketplace.



I hope you can get him to be honest and forthcoming with you.

Sincerely,

Dr. John Philip

Carbondale

Dear Editor,

There is plenty to be positive about at Carbondale Elementary School. The teaching staff is outstanding, the students are friendly and the diversity of the student body provides an excellent opportunity for children to appreciate cultural differences, the kind of education that is critically needed today.

However, if we truly want our schools to continue to be excellent, we need to acknowledge areas that need improvement, and not simply paint them over with a pretty face.

Suzie Romig’s article on the recent re-structuring of CES implies that it was a smooth transition accomplished with plenty of parent and teacher input. This is not true.

Speaking to a representative sample of parents and teachers would reveal that the process by which these changes were made was not adequate. The majority of teachers were given no opportunity to provide input (despite teachers’ repeated, and unsuccessful, attempts to meet with the principal). There were no meetings to inform parents about changes, let alone address parents’ concerns about the changes.

It’s time for the district office to acknowledge this mistake and to set up a meeting including the principal, teachers and parents and run by an outside mediator to air concerns and to come to some agreement about how such decisions will be made in the future.

CES is an excellent school, and I want it to stay that way. Ignoring problems when they do arise may help the school’s public image in the short run, but it will only hurt the true quality of the school in the long run.

Marty Pinela

Carbondale

Little input allowed

on CES restructuring

Dear Editor,

There is plenty to be positive about at Carbondale Elementary School. The teaching staff is outstanding, the students are friendly and the diversity of the student body provides an excellent opportunity for children to appreciate cultural differences, the kind of education that is critically needed today.

However, if we truly want our schools to continue to be excellent, we need to acknowledge areas that need improvement, and not simply paint them over with a pretty face.

Suzie Romig’s article on the recent re-structuring of CES implies that it was a smooth transition accomplished with plenty of parent and teacher input. This is not true.

Speaking to a representative sample of parents and teachers would reveal that the process by which these changes were made was not adequate. The majority of teachers were given no opportunity to provide input (despite teachers’ repeated, and unsuccessful, attempts to meet with the principal). There were no meetings to inform parents about changes, let alone address parents’ concerns about the changes.

It’s time for the district office to acknowledge this mistake and to set up a meeting including the principal, teachers and parents and run by an outside mediator to air concerns and to come to some agreement about how such decisions will be made in the future.

CES is an excellent school, and I want it to stay that way. Ignoring problems when they do arise may help the school’s public image in the short run, but it will only hurt the true quality of the school in the long run.

Marty Pinela

Carbondale

Dear Editor,

It is interesting how quickly calls for courtesy and neighborly love turn to legalism.

The one-mile section of Glenwood Canyon trail referenced by the Horseshoe Bend dog walkers in their letter of Dec. 14 includes portions of the city of Glenwood Springs.

Per the BLM office and a Glenwood Springs police officer, at exactly the halfway point around Horseshoe Bend there is a boundary line. The section of the trail west of the line is within the city of Glenwood Springs, and accordingly has a dog-at-large ordinance in place. East of the boundary to the locked gate at the bottom of No Name road is BLM land and has no leash law.

The aforementioned bicycle/dog collision occurred west of the boundary line in the city of Glenwood Springs. If there is no leash law there, then the city of Glenwood Springs improperly prosecuted one of its citizens.

All this discussion of laws misses the more important matter of courteous behavior.

My previous letter made no call for leashing dogs as a matter of law. I attempted to continue in the spirit of the previous letters, which were not making legal pleas, but pleas for community-building.

I absolutely agree that cyclists should indicate their approach from behind, yield to pedestrians and proceed with control. And I maintain that if dog owners sincerely wish to promote courteous behavior and neighborly co-existence, they will leash their dogs when on the trail.

Sincerely,

Dave Weidemann

Glenwood Springs

Dear Editor,

During this season of holiday celebrations, law enforcement officials won’t be the only ones on the lookout for drunks. Members of Glenwood Springs hospitality industry will also be on the lookout.

The Colorado Restaurant Association has trained hundreds of restaurant employees the techniques of serving adult beverages responsibly. Training includes everything from checking ID cards to recognizing when customers are becoming intoxicated and cutting off service.

The comprehensive training is expected to result in fewer traffic accidents during holiday celebrations as restaurant and bar staff are more vigilant about potential problems.

We serve food and drinks; not drunks. Restaurants care about their guests and want to ensure their safety.

The Colorado West Chapter of the CRA urges patrons to use a “designated driver.” This one step saves lives, prevents injuries, eliminates fines and attorney fees, and spares reputations. Having a sober person do the driving is just plain smart.

All of us in the western Colorado hospitality industry remind everyone to celebrate in a responsible manner. We wish our customers many happy returns.

Wayne Smith, president

Colorado West Chapter,

Colorado Restaurant

Association

Grand Junction


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