Letters to the Editor | PostIndependent.com

Letters to the Editor

Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

I am writing in response to Janell Senteney’s letter of Sept. 1 regarding medical jargon and health insurance.

I am surprised more people have not written about their frustrations of the health care system’s runaround.

I work in the health care system and it is amazing the hurdles people have with their insurance companies. You have to do quite a bit of legwork to figure out what is covered and what medications are covered.

If it is hard for us middle aged folks, just think of our elderly population. They have poor vision, poor hearing, and are unable to understand the person on the other side of the phone or the small print in handouts or books given to them.

Think of the population with diabetes type 1, supplies not covered for them to manage their health. Think of the folks receiving cancer treatments. Think of the folks who cannot even afford health insurance because they lost their jobs.

Talk to your doctors, call your insurance companies and share information with others.

I ask myself, how did this all get so out of hand?

Jenell Hilderbrand

Glenwood Springs

There appears to be a wide chasm of opinion concerning the proposed mill levy override request by local school districts Re-1 and Re-2. Here are some thoughts on the subject.

My wife and I have no children. She went to private school. I went to public school. Many of our friends have no children and are mostly products of public school systems. I tried to count the number of people I know, male and female, that are childless. It is dozens. Should we support the next generation, your children and grandchildren? As I like to do research, I have “polled” many of my childless friends concerning this issue. This is the general consensus from our conversations.

Band, recess, gym class, etc., available to all of us growing up, are things of the past in most schools. When we went to school, bake sales were for the band to go on trips, or cheerleaders to sponsor a dance or function. Now schools have bake sales to buy books. There are donation baskets for school supplies. This is an absolute disgrace! I have five relatives that teach, as well as many friends. I did not realize that they were the cause of the recession, the housing bubble, the loss of manufacturing jobs, and the unemployment problem. My sister in Florida raises three kids on $33,000 a year (with a master’s), working 10-plus hours per day teaching 20 children, some of which are “special needs” students. I’ve actually read articles calling teachers greedy.

One recent writer, Jane Spaulding, says she’s giving this a thumbs down. I wonder who paid for her education? She is upset that her Social Security did not go up. On March 10, she wrote this forum expressing her concern about education cuts on the federal level. What changed? No pay raise from the federal government? She suggested schools should charge a book fee? Does she understand what public versus private school means? I’m going to vote for the future of your kids. You should, too.

Craig S. Chisesi

Rifle

In response to Dan Miller’s “Writers On The Range” column of Sunday, Sept 4.

I, too, have had several contacts with mountain lions in the wild. A handful of uneventful sightings, two being at close range, and two incidents where I was being stalked. Both incidents where I was stalked were resolved “peaceably.” One where I discharged a firearm into the air and the animal retreated (I was prepared to shoot the lion had it showed any signs of aggression), and another in which I discovered a lion had stalked me for several hundred yards and had lain in wait for possible attack within 30 or so feet. I never did see this lion, only discovering its tracks in mine and doing a little back-trailing, was able to recreate its stalk. Why the cat broke off its stalk and did not attack, remains a mystery to me.

However, for you to second guess the fear and thoughts of the Utah hunter in his situation is absurd. You have had a close call, with support from your wife, Diane, and River Ranger Wright. You just as easily could have been attacked, mauled or killed. You made choices and they turned out OK. You, evidently, hold yourself as a bit of an expert due to your two encounters, readings and, thereby, hold others in contempt for making choices that were right for them, and within their legal right. It is unfortunate that a lion was killed in that Utah encounter. It would be tragic should that hunter have been killed.

It boils down to one statement you made: “If I were killed by an attacking lion in one of the wildest places on earth, it would have been an honor – though I have to admit it’s an honor I’d rather not receive.” Not every person who enters the back-country, shares your opinion that to be killed by a lion would be heroic and honorable. I respect your choice to be bait, respect my choice to live.

Stuart K. Cerise

West Valley, Utah

I was visiting a friend in Nebraska recently and noticed his bumper sticker. It’s a good one for these times and this past weekend in particular: The Weekend. Brought to you by the Labor Movement.

The Labor Movement created the conditions for something called the “middle class” to come into existence, and to grow. Hope you enjoyed the weekend, and give thanks for those who made it possible.

Susan Rhea

Glenwood Springs


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