Letters to the Editor | PostIndependent.com

Letters to the Editor

Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Exploring the spectrum – intentions, observations, speculations, inventions – and inadvertent creativity, I admit that it’s inappropriate for me to critique President Obama’s intentions. Nor will I try to comprehend the reasoning behind his latest “latest creation,” the “pass it now” Jobs Bill.

Maybe there was validity in the president’s demand to “pass it now” even before there was a bill to pass. Say what?

As for the bill itself, there are many well qualified experts expressing observations and especially questioning how jobs can be created by “raising taxes through the elimination of certain tax breaks.” Say what?

Although the jobs bill has been the big news, my speculation is that Obama may have finally inadvertently taken action that actually will create jobs. On Sept. 16, he signed the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, HR 1249, which is designed to reform the U.S. Patent Office’s procedure for processing patents, since there are approximately 700,000 applications backlogged in limbo. Say what?

While this had to be a no-brainer decision for Senate passage and presidential approval, isn’t it an excellent example of our federal government’s sense of urgency during our time of crisis?

Further speculation is that many of these patents will result in new products and product improvements, along with new technology that will not only expand existing markets but open new opportunities, as well, with the bottom line being job creation!

Isn’t it ironic that there are those who do manage to inadvertently be creative without actually realizing it?

Richard Doran

Parachute

I had to chuckle out of irony at the political cartoon of Sept. 23. There are two elephants reading a story, while the sheriff of Nottingham makes a comment about taking from the rich equating to class warfare, and then the sheriff pulls the lever that hangs Robin Hood.

Of course the sheriff would want to execute Robin Hood, because the sheriff represents the government, and Robin Hood stole from the government. All of the rich of those days were involved in the government of their day. They were part of the ruling class: dukes, barons, lords, earls and kings. Only nobility were allowed to own land, therefore all the rich were nobility.

Robin Hood didn’t steal from the population, he stole from the representatives of the king, who were overtaxing the population and driving the common person into poverty. Sound familiar?

In short, Robin Hood was the defender of the poor, and the scourge of government excess.

How ironic is it that the cartoon’s author tried to make a snarky point against conservatives, when in actuality he was illustrating the evils of big government, the big government that liberals seem to love so much. The deception that Robin Hood upheld today’s liberal viewpoints is just another example of disinformation coming from the left.

Joe Blanc

Silt

In his Sept. 12 My Side column on oil shale, Randy Udall seems to intentionally ignore both the facts and common sense.

The U.S. does contain the richest and largest, reserves of oil shale in the entire world. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates there is 1.5 trillion barrels of potentially recoverable oil in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. That is roughly five times more oil than in all of Saudi Arabia.

The U.S. EPA has confirmed that spent shale is not a hazardous waste, nor does it blow up like popcorn. Great strides are being made to use far less water.

While oil shale can be used to heat homes in furnaces and other similar technologies in some countries, in the U.S. it is being explored because of its potential to produce excellent sources of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. Unocal was producing jet fuel quality gasoline at its experimental retort near Parachute from 1980 until about 10 years ago.

Other countries around the world are aggressively pursuing oil shale development. Many, such as Estonia and China, are already utilizing oil shale as an energy source.

The use of fossil fuels in the U.S. is not going to slow any time soon. In fact the U.S. Energy Information Administration has stated that even with growing pressure to develop better hybrid vehicles or those that run on electricity, natural gas or biofuels, 93 percent of our vehicles will still run on oil by the year 2035.

Why is oil shale said to always be “10 years away?” This is mostly because of the overtly political nature of the regulatory process between administrations. No business can be expected to operate in unfriendly and unpredictable waters, especially when they are investing millions upon millions of dollars.

The United States needs to explore every option available to develop sustainable and environmentally responsible domestic energy sources. To do anything else is dangerous and irresponsible, and you don’t have to be an energy analyst to realize that.

Lois Dunn

Grand Junction

In a letter on Sept. 22, the Hamiltons of Carbondale report that Colorado ranks 40th in per-pupil expenditures.

It would be nice if they could also furnish a single study demonstrating a significant correlation between educational outcomes and the money spent to obtain them.

The District of Columbia, for example, perennially ranks first or second in per-pupil funding, and how’s that working out? Not even Saint Obama of Our Blessed Teachers Unions could abide the prospect of enrolling his daughters in D.C.’s public schools. Nor could the Clintons.

Conversely, roughly nine years ago a report revealed that North Dakota had the highest SAT scores in the nation, despite ranking 41st in per-pupil spending. North Dakota’s secret? Hard to say, but the fact that the state also ranked first in the percentage of two-parent families in the general population tells us where investments in education really matter: in the home.

Spend your money, if you wish, on the dubious fruits of educational bureaucracies, but please don’t spend mine. No to 3E.

Chad Klinger

Carbondale

Recently, people have suggested to us that it would be appropriate for City Council to use city funds to decrease the cost of water and sewer service to the citizens of Glenwood Springs instead of using those funds to build the Atkinson Trail.

On Sept. 8, Jan Girardot’s letter to the editor stated something similar, suggesting that money which may be allocated to the LoVa trail be used.

Regardless of the desires of the City Council, we are bound by the ordinances that govern the various funds that are available to the city. It is important to note that these ordinances were passed by a vote of the citizens of Glenwood Springs, not by the City Council.

In 1998, voters passed an amendment to the 1 percent sales tax and extended it to 2018. There is specific language in that ordinance that dictates the use of these funds. Among the required uses is the construction of the river trails system.

The language concerning the use of these funds for capital improvements reads, in part, “To defray the costs of capital improvements … which the City is … authorized to undertake … provided however that such improvements shall not include improvements to the City’s water system (other than those specified hereinabove) wastewater system, electrical system …”.

In short, it is not within our power to use these funds to reduce the costs of the city’s new wastewater treatment facility.

Ted Edmonds, city councilor, Ward 1

Leo McKinney, mayor pro-tem, Ward 5

Glenwood Springs

I am writing in support of Carbondale Police Officer Alvaro Agon.

I have known Officer Agon for about a year and a half now, and I do not believe the allegations against him.

He is caring and compassionate. He is an amazing officer who takes his job very seriously and his integrity is of utmost importance to him. I trust him with the safety of me and my family.

He is very respected by the community and most importantly the students. When he has been in public with our family, he is constantly approached by citizens and students. They greet him and interact with him as if he was a friend they have known for 20 years.

He is doing his job and deserves some respect.

We, as a community, need to come together in support of Officer Agon, and all the police officers who are protecting our towns, and show some appreciation.

I am grateful for the job Officer Agon does, as wells as all police officers in this valley.

Danielle Bennett

Glenwood Springs

Recently I find myself frequenting the writings of the Post Independent’s Opinion columnists, even those who historically caused me to flip the page.

Of the five or so regular columnists, all display a good vocabulary and can properly structure sentences and paragraphs. Most can maintain a smooth flow of thought from one paragraph to the next. Some have good research skills.

But in my opinion, only two write truly intelligent content. The leader among those two is Mary Boland.

I’ve only read two of Ms. Boland’s columns. Either I’ve missed a lot or she’s new on the scene. She has excellent writing skills, research skills, delivery, clear concise thoughts, and pragmatic conclusions. I would vote for Ms. Boland as president.

I won’t name my second place choice. That would only reveal on which side of center I stand. Sorry about that, No. 2.

Kirk Huyser

New Castle

I refuse to believe “corporations are people too,” until they execute one in Texas or Georgia.

Anita Sherman

Glenwood Springs


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