Colorado Parks and Wildlife regional roundtable delegate to be chosen | PostIndependent.com

Colorado Parks and Wildlife regional roundtable delegate to be chosen

One area hunter, angler or outdoor enthusiast will be selected next week as the next delegate to sit on the Northwest Region Sportsmen’s Roundtable.

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife regional caucus meet in Grand Junction Monday, providing an opportunity for locals to have a voice on wildlife matters. The chosen roundtable delegate will serve as a representative for the region on local concerns during statewide meetings.

“The roundtables formed several years back to help give sportsmen a voice,” said Mike Porras, CPW spokesperson. “Anybody that would like to be delegate can throw their hat in the ring.”

He said that becoming a delegate is one of the most-direct ways for those regional voices to be heard. Delegates can take their constituents’ concerns to the statewide sportsmen roundtables.

“There are multiple ways for the public to give CPW feedback, and this is just a more formalized way to do it,” Porras added.

Elected members can serve two-year terms and are expected to organize regional caucus meetings and be available to constituents, serving as their representatives for regional concerns during the statewide meetings, according to CPW. The new delegate will replace Grand Junction resident Margot Binetti.

“The roundtable and attendees have the final word about what hunting and fishing topics they would like to discuss,” said Regional Manager JT Romatzke in the CPW press release. “However, CPW will be there to answer questions as needed.”

The Roundtable consists of four appointed members and two elected members from each region. Twice each year, the Statewide Roundtable meets with the CPW Director and other members of the agency’s leadership for detailed discussions about a variety of management challenges.

big game licensing changes

Aside from serving as election day for the new delegate, the Northwest Region Sportsmen’s Roundtable will discuss a variety of topics regarding the local hunter and angler-related issues.

Matters expected to come up include CPW’s five-year Big Game Season Structure, chronic wasting disease, herd management plans and new license fees and requirements.

Colorado big-game license application enrollment begins March 1, and this year includes several changes to the licenses hunters hoping to draw should be aware of.

Porras said one the most significant changes is the requirement to have a qualified seasonal fishing or hunting license in order to apply for a big-game license.

He explained that those hoping to draw must already possess a qualifying license, including spring turkey, annual small game, annual resident combination small game and fishing licenses. A veteran’s lifetime resident combination small game/fishing license also qualifies.

Another change is the increase to application prices.

For more information on the changes, visit CPW’s YouTube site at goo.gl/cc1sxm.

“The philosophy behind requiring hunters to obtain a qualifying license is to make sure wildlife management is the foundation of our hunting opportunities,” said John Howard, chairman of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission, in a press release.

“License revenue is the primary funding source for wildlife conservation in Colorado,” he explained. “Applicants who are only seeking preference points are not currently contributing to those efforts.”

azorn@citizentelegram.com