Crews battle wildfires around Meeker, Rangely, Craig | PostIndependent.com
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Crews battle wildfires around Meeker, Rangely, Craig

Wildfires are burning in northwest Colorado, and danger remains high, the Bureau of Land Management said.
Afternoon winds Sunday fanned the Hunter Fire 20 miles southwest of Meeker and a new blaze called the Dead Dog Fire 10 miles north of Rangely.
Fire activity picked up significantly in the late afternoon on the lightning-ignited Hunter Fire 20 miles southwest of Meeker, which was at 992 acres late Sunday and 30 percent contained. More than 60 firefighters, five engines and a helicopter were working the fire, which is burning on BLM lands with oil and gas infrastructure is in the area. As activity picked up this afternoon, five single engine air tankers and two heavy air tankers worked the fire before moving over to the Dead Dog Fire.
The Dead Dog Fire was estimated at about 40 acres with no containment and is burning on BLM land 10 miles north of Rangley. The cause of this fire is under investigation.
Crews from the Northwest Colorado Interagency Fire Management Unit and Moffat County on Sunday evening contained the 67-acre Temple Fire about 25 miles west of Craig. It burned on BLM and private land.
The eight firefighters working and monitoring the 55-acre Cross Fire reached 60 percent containment through a combination of natural features and fire line. It is burning in a rugged, remote area on BLM land in the Cross Mountain Wilderness Study Area 35 miles west of Craig. Firefighters will continue to take suppression action if needed.
A Red Flag Warning signifying weather conditions that can lead to large fire growth remains in effect in northwestern Colorado through Monday.

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