Fight hunger at annual Empty Bowls fundraiser Oct. 12 | PostIndependent.com
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Fight hunger at annual Empty Bowls fundraiser Oct. 12

Sharon Sullivan
ssullivan@gjfreepress.com
Volunteers cook hot meals six days a week at the Grand Valley Catholic Outreach Soup Kitchen.
Submitted photo | Free Press

Go&Do

WHAT: Empty Bowls

WHEN: 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12

WHERE: Soup Kitchen, 245 S. 1st St.

COST: $25

INFO: 970-241-3658

A ceramic bowl will serve as a souvenir, as well as a reminder that there are hungry people in the Grand Valley.

A dozen or so members of the Junction Clay Arts Guild have donated more than 200 hand-thrown ceramic soup bowls for Grand Valley Catholic Outreach’s 18th annual Empty Bowls fundraiser Saturday, Oct. 12, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The public is invited to choose a bowl (that they get to keep) and fill it with soup for a mid-day meal at the Soup Kitchen, 245 S. First St. The dinner also includes bread, beverages and dessert.



Every penny of the $25 ticket goes to purchase food for the Catholic Outreach Soup Kitchen — where 250 to 300 people come daily for a hot meal, six days a week.

“It’s to supplement our donations,” which have been down since 2008, said Bev Lampley, director of development and communication at Catholic Outreach.



“Although the economy is doing better, the people we serve are not seeing it,” she said. “We serve (people) across the board — young, old, disabled, on the streets.”

It really is a community endeavor with 45 different restaurants donating soups for the event, Lampley said.

There will be 10-12 different soup varieties from which to choose, including creamy potato, chicken noodle, Italian wedding, artichoke Parmesan, green chili chicken. And you can go back for seconds!

Plus, vegetarian and gluten-free options will be available and labeled, Lampley said.

Slice of Life Bakery in Palisade, Great Harvest, Homestyle Bakery and Main Street Bagels are just some of the businesses donating food for the event.

Live music during the event will be performed by the Evergreen String Quartet, the group Free While Supplies Last, and a trio of viola players, Kara Leonardi, Kitty Nicholason and Kirsten Peterson.

“It really is an experience,” Lampley said. “And tickets are flying out the door.”

Empty Bowls is limited to 1,000 patrons.

Wayne Petefish, who owns Grand Junction Clay and Red Hawk Pottery, fired up his kiln earlier this week as he prepared to donate 25 bowls.

Each year he makes traditional soup-type bowls in a fairly uniform fashion.

Empty Bowls patrons “can end up with a set over the years,” he said. “Sometimes, I change it up a bit.”

Guild member Ronda Clark donated two dozen bowls in a variety of colors.

“They all come from local potters (from inside and outside the guild),” Clark said. “It’s a good way to help people.”

The Junction Clay Arts Guild meets monthly, and hosts member exhibits three or four times a year.

For more information about the guild, visit http://www.jcag.com.

To purchase a ticket to Empty Bowls call 970-241-3658, or stop by Catholic Outreach, 245 S. 1st St. Tickets are also available at all City Market stores.


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