Food: Big Game? Big Food! | PostIndependent.com

Food: Big Game? Big Food!

Lee Mathis
INSANELEE DECADENT
Free Press Food Columnist
Lee Mathis
Staff Photo |

BRAISED SHORT RIBS WITH BEER & HOISIN

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cooking Time: 3 hours

Total Time: 3 hours, 20 minutes

Ingredients:

• 3 pounds beef short ribs (English cut)

• Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

• 10 to 12 garlic cloves smashed

• 1 1/2-inch piece ginger, peeled and sliced into 1/4-inch slices

• 1 1/2 bottles good ale (like Bass or Brooklyn Lager)

• 3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

• 1 cup hoisin sauce

• 2 teaspoons corn starch (optional)

• 2 scallions, finely chopped (for garnish)

• Sesame seeds, toasted (for garnish)

Directions:

(Note: You can either use a slow-cooker or a dutch oven for this. Both work well).

1. Season the ribs generously with salt and pepper. Heat the vegetable oil in a large heavy pan over high heat (do this step in the dutch oven if you’re not using a slow-cooker). Brown the ribs well on all sides, in batches if necessary. Remove the ribs and pour off all but a tablespoon of the rendered fat.

2. Return the pot to the stove, lower the heat to medium-low and saute the garlic and ginger for about 3 minutes. Be careful it doesn’t burn. Add one of the beers and the vinegar and scrape the bottom of the pan to de-glaze any brown bits.

3. Add the ribs to the slow-cooker (or back to the liquid in the dutch oven). Pour the beer and vinegar over the ribs. The ribs should be about 3/4 of the way submerged in the liquid. If they’re too exposed, add some more beer (or use beef stock or water).

4. Cook on the high setting in the slow-cooker or gently simmer in the covered dutch oven for 2 1/2 hours.

5. Pour the hoisin sauce over the ribs, stir and cook, uncovered, for 30 more minutes.

6. Remove ginger from sauce. If you’re serving right away, strain fat from the top of the pot (or use a gravy separator). If you’re refrigerating overnight, skim the fat off when it’s cold. If you want the sauce to be thicker, make a corn starch slurry (2 teaspoons corn starch stirred into 1 tablespoon cold water). Stir the slurry into the simmering sauce a little at a time until you like the thickness.

SOURCE: www.nerdwithknives.com

Rumor has it, there’s a football game this Sunday.

Yes, friends, the Denver Broncos made it back and are facing off against the Seattle Seahawks (two cities I enjoy).

The Super Bowl is always a good time, even though some of the games have not been stellar. But it’s the last game of the season, and that alone is a reason to both commiserate and celebrate.

And what better way to send this season off than with some great food! Head out to one of the many establishments around town, to a friend’s house for a party, or serve food at home.

I usually do not go out for the Super Bowl (been there, done that) and I usually work Sundays. So I generally plan out something that I can get going in the morning or early afternoon, so that it’s ready for half time.

Admission: Yeah, I know, if the game is not that great and the commercials and/or halftime show are not holding my attention, even I have found myself dozing off after the half-time meal.

That brings me to my website of the week, from our friends at http://www.bonappetit.com/super-bowl.

It’s all about Super Bowl foods. They have recipes from dips to wings to nachos and much more.

And when I saw our recipe of the week, it just screamed, “Make me for the Super Bowl!”

You can prep it in the morning and it will be perfect for halftime. I mean, come on — beer, short-ribs and hoisin?

GJ Free Press food columnist Lee Mathis is the founder and owner of Decadence Gourmet Cheesecakes and Catering. He can be reached via email at decadencecheesecakes@mindspring.com, on the Web at http://www.decadencecheesecakes.com, or by calling 970-256-4688. Also, find him on the Web by searching Facebook, Pinterest or by visiting Twitter (@decadenceGJ).


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