Glenwood in-town recycling site options are few and far between | PostIndependent.com

Glenwood in-town recycling site options are few and far between

Jessica Fisher of Glenwood Springs drops her cardboard recycling at the Glenwood Springs recycle center at 11th and School streets. The center is to be moved to the South Canyon Landfill in the spring.
John Stroud / Post Independent |

Glenwood Springs city officials have looked at several alternatives for establishing a new in-town recycling center to replace the one next to Glenwood Springs Elementary School that recently closed to make way for the school’s expansion.

However, all but one are not that workable for a long-term solution because they’re not fully owned by the city or have greater potential to be used for something else in the future.

The one that could work as a permanent site someday, the municipal airport beyond the Four Mile Road turnoff south of Midland Avenue, is hampered by its remoteness and problems with traffic getting there, at least until the South Bridge connection gets built, City Council members said during a discussion last week.

“Once we have South Bridge in, it opens up the airport as a possibility,” Mayor Michael Gamba said. “It’s probably the least problematic, but not until the traffic situation is dealt with.”

After the former recycling center on School Street closed at the end of February, the city moved the recycle bins to the South Canyon Landfill several miles west of town where an existing recycling drop-off station was expanded. The landfill recycling center also has additional days and hours of operation compared to the former in-town facility.

Due to the popularity of having a more convenient, in-town location, as stated by several residents who spoke before council recently in favor of finding a new central location, the city has been researching its options.

Two privately owned sites involving back parking lots at the Safeway grocery store and at Wal-Mart were not acceptable to the corporate property owners, City Manager Debra Figueroa said. Another, at the Glenwood Meadows shopping center, is still under consideration by the owner there, she said.

Among the publicly owned sites that have been considered are the airport and the city parking lot west of City Hall. The latter could work for the short term but would mean giving up public parking spaces, and the site is within the river confluence study area that is being planned for eventual redevelopment, Figueroa noted.

Two properties that are partially owned by the city are on Centennial Street and at the bottom of Traver Trail, but those would require agreements with the Colorado Department of Transportation, which owns the other portion of the sites. There’s also the Stevens property below Glenwood Springs High School, and several sites near the Glenwood Community Center, but those areas also are being eyed for other future uses.

And, all of them have challenges in terms of neighborhood impacts, Figueroa said.

“It’s hard to find an isolated location in the center of town that doesn’t impact someone,” she said.

Council said it would remain open to these or any other alternatives that come up, and urged the public to continue offering any other solutions.

Meanwhile, the landfill, located on Garfield County Road 134, off Interstate 70 at the South Canyon exit, is the only drop-off location for recycling offered by the city. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday.

The landfill recycling center will accept electronic waste, aluminum and steel cans, glass bottles, plastics No. 1-7, newspapers, junk mail, cardboard and slick paper products. For more information, contact the landfill directly at 970-945-5375.


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