Grand Junction’s Roice-Hurst Humane Society & Mesa County Animal Shelter in need of donations | PostIndependent.com

Grand Junction’s Roice-Hurst Humane Society & Mesa County Animal Shelter in need of donations

Caitlin Row
crow@gjfreepress.com
A Roice-Hurst volunteer plays with a shelter dog. This local no-kill shelter is in great need of dog and cat food, plus cat litter. Donations may be dropped off during regular business hours.
Submitted Photo |

Summertime means more pets need shelter at local animal rescue facilities. And with Grand Junction’s Roice-Hurst Humane Society currently running at full capacity, the no-kill shelter is sorely in need of dog and cat food, plus cat litter.

“We are usually a full house,” Roice-Hurst Shelter Manager Judy Bowes said, with up to 50 cats and 50 dogs.

Bowes added that it takes about $250 a week to feed shelter dogs, another $150 a week for cats and kittens, plus an additional $150 for cat litter weekly.

“We use Purina and Pedigree, both dog and cat food,” she said. “We also like to have kitten food. Big bags are best, but we also use canned (Friskies) cat and kitten food.”

“We have kittens coming out of our ears right now.”
— Roice-Hurst Shelter Manager Judy Bowes

Collars and leashes for bigger dogs are also needed.

The Roice-Hurst Humane Society is jam-packed because Bowes said more people tend to relinquish their pets during the summer months due to housing issues. Roice-Hurst volunteers additionally take in many adoptable dogs and cats from Mesa County Animal Services, which needs food donations for its shelter as well.

“We could always use donations of food,” Mesa County Animal Services Director Penny McCarty said. “That can be dog food, cat food, puppy food, and formula for kittens. That’s what we need the most.”

Treats and rawhides are also nice items to give, McCarty noted: “Things to keep the animal’s life enhanced. Something to keep them busy is always good.”

Mesa County Animal Shelter is currently full as well, with hundreds of animals moving through its doors each month. Because it’s a mission shelter, volunteers and staff must make room for new animals, no matter what.

“We could do a hoarding case tomorrow and bring in 60 animals,” McCarty continued. “It’s not unheard of to bring in 40 animals in a day — litters of cats and puppies, plus lost dogs” and relinquishments.

“Tomorrow, we have a transfer with 10 dogs going to the Front Range,” McCarty added. “We are doing OK, but we are busy.”

More than 40 dogs are available for adoption at Roice-Hurst Humane Society, as well, with lots of cats and 20 kittens.

“We have kittens coming out of our ears right now,” Bowes said. “We’d like to get the kittens adopted before they’re adult cats. We have a special deal going on right now. If you adopt one kitten, you get one free.”

But before adoptions can be finalized, Roice-Hurst and Mesa County Animal Services volunteers take care to find out if prospective families understand the commitment and what it takes to be a responsible pet owner. They additionally evaluate each living situation to protect the animals in need. Pets available for adoption vary daily.

Donations of food and supplies may be dropped off at the Roice-Hurst Humane Society, located at 362 28 Road, right off Riverside Parkway in Grand Junction.

Mesa County Animal Services is open seven days a week at 971 Coffman Road in Whitewater (near the landfill). Donations may be dropped off there during open business hours.

According to McCarty, lost dogs (or other pets) may be claimed Monday through Sunday. Plus, missing pets may be reported seven days a week and in the evenings.

For more information about available pets or to volunteer at Roice-Hurst, visit http://www.rhhumanesociety.com or call 970-434-7337.

To learn more about Mesa County Animal Services or to report a missing animal, visit http://www.animalservices.mesacounty.us or call 970-242-4646.


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