Habitat ReStore plans bigger ‘forever home’ | PostIndependent.com

Habitat ReStore plans bigger ‘forever home’

Ryan Summerlin
rsummerlin@postindependent.com
Stirling Jones moves a rug from the front of the Habitat Restore warehouse to the back at the Highway 82 location.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent |

Habitat for Humanity of the Roaring Fork Valley is getting a permanent home as it builds a new ReStore location that will dwarf its three existing locations.

Habitat has been helping people in the Roaring Fork Valley become homeowners since 2007, and “now we’re looking to establish our own forever home,” said Scott Gilbert, president of the local Habitat.

The project will be about $5.5 million: $2.5 million for buying the land and about $3 million for construction, said Gilbert.

The ReStore is now waiting on a $5 million loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, but the process is slow, he said. And in the meantime Habitat is raising money from individual donors for the cause.

“These are not just functional items but also some extraordinary pieces.”

Scott Gilbert
president Habitat for Humanity of the Roaring Fork Valley

At last count Gilbert said they’d raised more than $500,000 in pledges and donations, with a goal to bring in another $500,000.

For now, Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley has ReStores scattered across Garfield County, in West Glenwood, Basalt and one about 7 miles south of Glenwood Springs on Highway 82.

Having its inventory spread across the valley becomes logistically difficult and adds expenses, said Gilbert. Habitat rents those three locations, and just like any other renter, it is subject to increasing rates.

Having taken stock of the area, Habitat concluded no building was available at the right price that would suit Habitat’s needs. So the organization is building a facility from scratch, which the local Habitat staffers are calling ReStore 2.0.

The new facility will be next door to the existing ReStore south of Glenwood Springs.

All of the three ReStores combined are about 51,000 square feet, and the new facility will have 55,000 square feet on its own, said Gilbert.

The new building will work as a centralized location. And though Habitat hasn’t decided what to do with the other locations yet, they might not be necessary once the new ReStore is up and running.

The new facility would become Habitat for Humanity of the Roaring Fork Valley’s main location.

The ReStores are key in paying for the organization’s home-building projects. Money from store sales make up the difference of what a home really costs and what the family is paying.

Sales from the Roaring Fork Valley’s ReStores, which draw thousands of customers each year, cover all of Habitat’s local operating costs and administrative expenses, said Gilbert.

With its proximity to the high-dollar Aspen and other nearby areas, the ReStores in the Roaring Fork Valley get especially high-quality items, said Gilbert. “These are not just functional items but also some extraordinary pieces.”

Hotels in Aspen frequently donate items that get sold at dramatically reduced prices, he said.

The Roaring Fork Valley’s ReStores are ranked as some of the best in the country, so people come from all over to shop at Habitat’s stores here, he said.

The Roaring Fork Valley’s ReStores help thousands of community members get great products at great prices each year, and they spare those items from the landfill, said Gilbert.

Habitat is aiming to start construction in the spring and wrap up before the end of the year, said Gilbert.

Visit HabitatRoaringFork.org/ReStore2-0 for more information about how to donate to the campaign.


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