Man charged with killing father ‘has mental issues’ | PostIndependent.com

Man charged with killing father ‘has mental issues’

Will Grandbois
will@postindependent.com
Anthony William Padia
Staff Photo |

Anthony Padia, 27, may not be competent to stand trial for the suspected second-degree murder of his 65-year-old father, Leon.

“Anthony has some mental issues and acts more like a child than 27 years old,” his arrest affidavit reads.

Leon Padia was found dead in his bed in Silt last week after fighting with his son the night before.

Anthony Padia, who was born and raised in the area and worked at a ranch on Silt Mesa, appeared in court Monday before Magistrate Holly Strablizky to advise him of the potential ramifications of the charge: 16 to 48 years in prison and 5 years’ mandatory parole.

Deputy District Attorney Scott Turner took advantage of the hearing to file a motion to address the mental competency of te defendant, a move supported by public defenders Sara Steele and Elise Myer, who applied to represent Padia.

According to the affidavit, Anthony Padia’s mother, Sherry, called police on the morning of Dec. 17 after she woke to find Leon, who usually rose early, cold and unresponsive. She had not yet awakened her sons when deputies arrived at the family’s home. She told them that Leon had been his usual self when he went to bed around 10 p.m., although he might have had a cold and took multiple packages of Alka-Seltzer Plus.

Anthony’s brother Randy woke up and spoke to officers, informing them Anthony and Leon sometimes fight and that each of them drank several beers the night before and had a fight in the living room, during which Anthony appeared to choke Leon. He added that he had heard his father cough around 6:30 that morning. According to the narrative, when deputies attempted to contact Anthony, they found him fully clothed in bed.

An autopsy performed on Dec. 18 revealed contusions on Leon Padia’s chest and neck, as well as ruptured blood vessels around his mouth and eyes.

Deputies returned to the house Dec. 19 and spoke with the family again. According to the affidavit, Anthony told police that he had fought with his father the evening before his death, ultimately punching him in the chest and choking him, but let his father go when he coughed. He said that his father had gone to bed afterward, and that he planned to apologize for the confrontation in the morning.

Magistrate Strablizky upheld the $25,000 bond set when Padia was booked Dec. 19. Even if he’s able to post it, it’s unlikely he will be returning home anytime soon. Turner also asked for, and received, a protection order for Padia’s mother and brother.

“These two people were witnesses to a homicidal act,” he told the court. He said he had spoken to Sherry Padia, who had “indicated that she would not be able to control the defendant if he in fact posted bond and came home.”

The motion to address competency will be reviewed by Judge James Boyd.

It is the only 2014 murder case in Garfield County. The April shooting death of Audrey Lowndes in April as her boyfriend tried to get a gun away from her was deemed an accident, and the shooting of Thomas Ornelas by a state trooper May 8 in Glenwood Canyon was ruled justified. Ornelas had opened fire and wounded another trooper during a traffic stop.

Other nearby homicides in 2014 occurred in other counties; Williams Amaya faces first-degree murder charges in Eagle County for the killing of his aunt and uncle in El Jebel in July; a 14-year-old boy pleaded guilty in Eagle County last week to killing his father in April; and William Styler pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the February slaying of Nancy Pfister in Pitkin County.


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