Singer-songwriter Cosy Sheridan performs in Grand Junction’s Radio Room | PostIndependent.com
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Singer-songwriter Cosy Sheridan performs in Grand Junction’s Radio Room

Sharon Sullivan
ssullivan@gjfreepress.com
Singer-songwriter Cosy Sheridan will perform in the Radio Room in Grand Junction, Saturday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m.
Submitted photo |

GO&DO

WHAT: Singer-songwriter Cosy Sheridan concert

WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m.

WHERE: In Grand Junction at the Radio Room, 1310 Ute Ave.

COST: $15 advance; $18 door

INFO: 970-241-8801, ext. 210, or http://www.kafmradio.org

Cosy Sheridan is not only a skilled guitarist with a beautiful singing voice. She’s also an eloquent songwriter with a sharp wit who engages with her audience. She’ll perform up close at the Radio Room, Saturday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m.

Sheridan has a new CD titled “Pretty Bird” that comes out Friday, Feb. 14. The album is a collection of songs she’s written in the past 18 months.

The earlier songs written for the CD are about coping with the end of a relationship with her former partner in music and life, T.R. Ritchie. Subsequent songs on the album are about finding new love. Later, after Sheridan learned that Ritchie was seriously ill, she wrote songs about him.



“The last song for the CD is a song of ‘good-bye,’” Sheridan said by phone in Moab, where she will perform Friday, Feb. 14, at the Moab Arts and Recreation Center.

Ritchie died Jan. 29, after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in December.



Sheridan was in the middle of writing the title track, “Pretty Bird,” when she learned of Ritchie’s illness. He had posted online a poem about a raven, and had talked about “coming back” as a raven, Sheridan said.

“The song ‘Pretty Bird’ turned out to be about T.R.,” she said.

There will also be plenty of light-hearted moments throughout Saturday’s show. Sheridan is a “natural entertainer” whose songs are always poignant and often funny. One of her new songs is called “Welcome to Boston,” a humorous tune about driving in the city.

Sheridan moved from New England to Moab in 1994, where she and Ritchie founded the Moab Folk Camp — a song-writing and music camp for adults. This year’s camp will take place Nov. 2-7, and will feature Brooks Williams, “a fabulous guitarist form England,” Sheridan said.

Also teaching at the folk camp will be Ellis, (she goes by one name) a songwriter and performer who has performed the past two years at the Moab Folk Festival where she’s won the “People’s Choice” award both years.

While she’s kept her Moab home, Sheridan moved back to New England last year to be near her elderly parents and her beau Charley Koch, who plays bass with her. In New England, touring is also easier with shows much closer together distance-wise.

“The Albuquerque Journal” described Sheridan as “A Buddhist monk in a 12-step program trapped in the body of a singer/songwriter,” — an apt portrayal, said KAFM operations manager Ramona Winkeller, who has attended Sheridan’s Radio Room concerts.

“Cosy always fills the room with laughter and music, and delights the audience with new insights into life,” Winkeller said.


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