Six signs it’s too warm in February | PostIndependent.com
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Six signs it’s too warm in February

Sandals in February? Yep ...
Caitlin Row / crow@gjfreepress.com | Free Press

It feels like spring in Colorado’s Grand Valley, even though it’s only mid-February.

According to Jim Pringle, a warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service, Grand Junction temperatures have ranged between 46 and 63 degrees between Feb. 1-10.

“Maximum temperatures in Grand Junction have been above normal since Jan. 6, with two exceptions being Jan. 11 and Jan. 22,” Pringle said. “Additionally, maximum temperatures in Grand Junction were also above normal during the period of Dec. 1 through Dec. 16.”



NEW WEATHER RECORD SET

On Feb. 8 at 2:14 p.m., Pringle confirmed that a new temperature record was set at Grand Junction Regional Airport — 61 degrees.



“The previous record was 60 degrees, set in 1996 and 1954,” he explained.

MOUNTAIN BIKERS FLOOD AREA TRAILS

A constant flow of Facebook and Instagram photos revealed that Mesa County’s mountain-bike trails have flooded with recent activity — especially in Grand Junction’s Lunch Loops area and Fruita’s Kokopelli area. Even folks from Colorado’s high country are getting in on the action, driving west for day trips to enjoy sunshine and dry singletrack.

PATIO FURNITURE MAKES AN APPEARANCE

Restaurants all over the valley have been taking advantage of sunny, warm weather with outdoor dining options. For instance, Cafe Sol in downtown Grand Junction has been busy with outside seating all week.

FOLKS SHOW SOME SKIN

Residents and visitors — wearing sandals, shorts, T-shirts (and in some cases no shirt) — have been spotted outside quite a bit. Don’t forget to apply sunscreen!

FLIES SUDDENLY BUZZING

A large, black fly recently buzzed into the home of one Free Press staffer, to her chagrin. Insects are starting to hatch …

APPEARANCE OF BUDS & BLOOMS

All over Mesa County, the Free Press hears reports of early blooms and buds, along with quickly greening grass.

With early blooming, surely there will be another winter freeze. The question is: will it impact Grand Valley’s growing season for peaches and grapes?

Winter is surely not over — so don’t pack up your winter clothes just yet.


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