Porcelain artist takes the wheel at clay center | PostIndependent.com

Porcelain artist takes the wheel at clay center

Post Independent Writer

The board of directors of the Carbondale Clay Center has appointmented Lauren Kearns, a porcelain artist, as its new executive directorKenney is most recently from Santa Barbara, Calif., where she was an instructor and studio manager of the Ridley Tree Education Center at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. With an extensive career in the field of ceramics spanning twenty years, Kearns replaces Diane Kenney, founder of the Clay Center in 1997.”Lauren’s career includes demonstrated accomplishments in education including university faculty experience, adult education programs and community college teaching,” said Katherine Hubbard, president of the Carbondale Clay Center. “She has strong analytical, organizational, interpersonal, and communication skills. Lauren is a high-energy self-starter who is able to be flexible and capable of taking on challenges and responsibilities. She’ll be an asset to the Clay Center.”Prior to her work in California, Kearns was a professor and instructor of beginning ceramics in Washington state, at both the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma and Green River Community College in Auburn. She also taught ceramics at the Bellevue Art Museum and the Moshier Art Center in Burien. She has shown in both invitational and juried exhibits nationally, in more than 50 shows, and her work is in collections in Japan, France and Germany. “I enjoy throwing porcelain because of its texture and fluidity of movement on the potter’s wheel. My primary interest in ceramics is to create objects that we use in everyday life that bring beauty and joy. As our society becomes more desensitized to the individual, I feel that creating objects from hand, in ways that have existed throughout time, is vital and necessary to maintaining a healthy community. I welcome the chance to step into the classes and programs at the clay center, and to experience how this community embraces the value of ceramic arts,” Kearns said.”I enjoy throwing porcelain because of its texture and fluidity of movement on the potter’s wheel. My primary interest in ceramics is to create objects that we use in everyday life that bring beauty and joy. As our society becomes more desensitized to the individual, I feel that creating objects from hand, in ways that have existed throughout time, is vital and necessary to maintaining a healthy community. I welcome the chance to step into the classes and programs at the clay center, and to experience how this community embraces the value of ceramic arts,” Kearns said.


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