Precautions can prevent hantavirus | PostIndependent.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Precautions can prevent hantavirus

Spring rains could mean a greater danger of hantavirus this year.The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reported the state’s first case of the acute respiratory disease in early April. A La Plata County man was hospitalized in mid-March with an illness later confirmed as hantavirus. Spring rains could mean a greater danger of hantavirus this year.The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reported the state’s first case of the acute respiratory disease in early April. A La Plata County man was hospitalized in mid-March with an illness later confirmed as hantavirus. “This early-season case serves as a reminder for people to take simple precautions to avoid exposure to hantavirus when opening cabins and doing spring cleaning,” said John Pape, an epidemiologist with the CDPHE. “It is expected that mouse populations may be high this year due to the increased moisture in many areas of the state.”Hantavirus is carried by deer mice, which are found throughout Colorado, most commonly in rural areas. Although the disease is well-known, a variant was discovered in the Four Corners area in 1993 when a Navajo runner and his girlfriend died within one week of each other from respiratory failure.Garfield County had its first case of hantavirus in 1994 when a Glenwood Springs man died of the disease after cleaning under a trailer, said county public health nurse Mary Meisner.The last case reported in this area was in 1998 when a Wolcott man was diagnosed with hantavirus. In 2004, there were four cases in Colorado, including one death.Mice release the virus in their urine and feces. Humans contract the disease not by direct contact with deer mice but by breathing in the dust stirred up in sheds, trailers, cabins, or any place infested with mice.Recent moisture has caused a lush growth of plants. “More food equals more mice,” Pape said. In fact, this year could see a population boom in deer mice.Pape said people should be especially careful if they notice a high number of mice as evidenced by droppings or nests, mouse damage or live mice.”As people begin cleaning out barns, garages, storage buildings, trailers or cabins that have been closed up all winter, they need to take precautions before beginning such work, particularly if there are signs of mice,” Pape said.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Glenwood Springs and Garfield County make the Post Independent’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User