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Slow cookin’ at Carbondale

CARBONDALE – Barbecue is one of the original slow foods. It takes hours, even days to properly smoke a pig or a cow. And these days, the Roaring Fork Valley is all about slow food.The slow food movement has taken off fast, with chapters all over the world dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of traditional and artisan foods and the advocacy of sustainability.More than ever before, the fourth annual KDNK Blues and BBQ Fest will focus on slow food: slow cooked meats, locally grown organic produce and the power of food and drink to bring people together.”I’ve always wanted to bring the slow food element into the celebration,” said KDNK development director Amy Kimberly. “It’s a time to celebrate the local meats and to pay tribute to the heritage of ranching we have around here.”New this year, Blues and BBQ will offer a Slow Food Grand BBQ Tasting. The Village Smithy hosts this tasty feast, prepared by chef Jamie Theriot of the soon-to-open Smoke Modern Barbecue restaurant in the Willits Town Centre, from 4-7 p.m. The dinner features locally and sustainably raised beef, pork, and lamb, as well as organic peaches, corn, melons and other seasonal produce. Information about local ranchers and farmers who are providing the food will be available.Tickets are limited. Cost is $27 per person, benefitting KDNK and Slow Food Roaring Fork.Downtown, there will be cooking demos by renowned chef Eugenia Bone, Rikki McKenna and other local chefs. The Mount Sopris Historical Society hosts an old-fashioned ice cream social booth with sundaes and root beer floats. All proceeds from the booth go to the soon-to-open historical museum on the corner of Weant and Highway 133.”It is such a beautiful time of year, there is so much bounty,” said Kimberly, of all the food that is sprouting out of the ground right now.Woody’s Rollin’ Smoke BBQ will be downtown starting at 3 p.m. selling all sorts of slow roasted barbecue meats and corn on the cob.The fest is not all about food, though. There is drink, Colorado-brewed Tommyknocker beer and, of course, the blues.Cuban-born guitarist Eddie Turner and his band will be rockin’ Main Street starting at 7 p.m. Local favorites Seventh Hour will open at 5 p.m. Turner played the Telluride Blues and Brews Festival last year and will bring his brand of scorching blues to Carbondale. In 2005, Turner released his first solo CD “Rise” to widespread acclaim, resulting in a Blues Music Award nomination for Best New Artist Debut and Best Blues CD from Denver’s Westword magazine. Turner spent about seven years with blues man Otis Taylor before breaking off on his own. “I’ve been playing guitar for about 45 years. I really like playing with my own band. It’s great; I get to play a lot, meet new people and travel,” said Turner, in a phone interview as he was getting ready to play a gig in Dillon last week. “We use a lot of Latin rhythms and interesting flavors. We change the music a lot; it can be kind of jazzy, psychedelic, Latin or straight blues rock.””Otherworldly, scorching, polyrhythmic and chilling” have all been used to describe Turner’s guitar playing, which is influenced by rock legends such as Jimi Hendrix. As for the nickname Otis Taylor gave him, Devil Boy, he said he’s not sure where that came from. But the folks in Carbondale might get a chance to find out.”It’s fun,” said Turner, of his music. “I never get bored, so I don’t think anyone else will get bored.”There will also be a cruiser bike race from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Fourth Street Plaza, with a $10 entry fee.Blues and BBQ is a free event in downtown Carbondale starting at 3 p.m. Saturday with cooking demonstrations. Proceeds from food and beer sales benefit KDNK public radio. KDNK is still looking for volunteers to help with the event. To volunteer or to reserve tickets for the Grand Tasting, call 963-0139. For information or to volunteer for the ice cream booth, call 963-9371.


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