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Snowmagical Family Fun Fest in Snowmass

Staff ReportGlenwood Springs, CO Colorado

SNOWMASS VILLAGE – Heading into its second quarter century, the 26th annual Snowmagical Family Fun Fest continues its tradition of family fun this weekend.And, after 25 years on the Snowmass Village Mall, Saturday’s festivities move to the grassy fields near the new Snowmass Recreation Center.More than a dozen entertainers and magicians will flock to Snowmass today and Saturday for live performances and interactive fun. The award-winning music duo The Swingset Mamas, whose song “Sunscreen Dance” was recently chosen as the Environmental Protection Agency’s Sunwise Program theme, perform songs that tap into the fundamental joys and struggles of parents and their children.Bob Sheets – the original Jolly Jester who founded the now-defunct Tower Restaurant’s magic bar 32 years ago – returns, as does storyteller Denise Berry-Hanna. Magic-wielding maestros include Doc Eason, Mike T., Wayne Francis, Marty Wayne, Cliff Tiffany, Ann Lincoln, John T. Sheets, Darren Flores, Tammy Baar, Marty McDowell, Scott Macray, Mack Eason, Lew Wymisner, Eric Mead and Jammin Jim.The event starts today with a Harry Potter book-release party, complete with free magic wands for the kids. The Snowmass Village Mall hosts magicians and street performers offering impromptu shows. As the sun sets, the action moves to Fanny Hill, where Berry-Hanna regales families with her magical tall tales. “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” plays on the outdoor screen at dusk, followed by the release of the final book in the Harry Potter series at midnight at Snowmass Photo & Books. Books can be pre-ordered for pick-up at 12:01a.m.Family-friendly activities continue Saturday near the Snowmass Recreation Center as Rocky Mountain Martial Arts students perform their Soo Bak Do presentation at 9:30 a.m., followed by back-to-back magic performances. Ventriloquists, illusionists and clowns and free afternoon puppet and juggling workshops will also add to the fun. New this year is the DNA Evolution Tour, the summer’s largest U.S. amateur freeskiing, from 12-3 p.m. The ski and snowboard rail jam is making 23 stops across the west, and hosts a 30-foot-by-80-foot ramp of rails and rollers for amateurs to catch big air and practice their best winter moves. The competition is open to all amateurs and includes a $500 cash first prize and “best trick” and “best trick – 13 years and under” awards. For more information, visit http://www.dnaevolutiontour.com.The festival concludes on the mall, where magicians roam table-side at the Magic Dine-Around (Zanes, Margarita Grill, Stewpot, Big Hoss, Mountain Dragon, il Poggio, Brothers Grill and Artisan). The Magic Cabaret brings performers together at the Stonebridge Inn for a 9 p.m. finale at $5 per person.For more information, visit http://www.snowmassvillage.com.


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