Surviving a 30-dayBig Mac attack | PostIndependent.com
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Surviving a 30-dayBig Mac attack

Editor’s note: He Said/She Said is a new Options feature, written by Dan Thomas of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Kimberly Nicoletti of the Summit Daily News.”Super Size Me” is currently playing at 8 p.m. at the Crystal Theatre in Carbondale. It is not rated.OK, I have to say it:Morgan Spurlock is one all-beef fatty with a special cause who lets us see what happens on a fast-food run.”Super Size Me” is Spurlock’s chronicle of his month-long Big Mac attack on his own system: three meals a day at McDonald’s for 30 days. And it packs the per-dollar wallop of an extra value meal. For a movie whose biggest budget item might be a month worth of McDonald’s, it’s a haymaker of a documentary, like “Bowling for Columbine” taking aim at fast food.Only unlike Michael Moore, Spurlock does it without grandstanding, letting the look of McDonald’s and its “heavy users” – wan fleshtones dotted with Technicolor red and yellow – do the talking. Spurlock’s body also bears a large load of the film, literally, as his weight balloons, and figuratively, as his cholesterol rises, his liver leaks toxins and the saturated fat chokes off his sex drive.Don’t let Kimberly’s mug shot fool you: There’s probably only a McNuggett of truth to her putting on bad nutrition habits – the only thing I think I’ve ever seen her eat is whole-grain bread the density of depleted uranium. On the other hand, I’m not exactly a fast-food abuser – my last McDonald’s experience before a post-“Super Size Me” sundae with Kim and former “He Said” Aidan Leonard was when my mom bought me breakfast there in September. But I’m no Atkins angel: I do visit KFC once a month or so for cultural reasons, and I did try to see how many days I could live on pot pies and Evan Williams once in 2003. And while “Super Size Me” didn’t really nauseate me, the vaguely queasy, greasy look of fast-food empires and their subjects made me uncomfortable – kind of the opposite of motion-picture product placement. In fact, I think either Dr. Arthur Agatston or Eric Schlosser should jump on this movie – it’d make a fine side dish to either “The South Beach Diet” or “Fast Food Nation” since it takes a novel, more palatable approach to saying some of the same things.Dan Thomas is a former Summit Daily News arts and entertainment editor who works directly across the street from a Wendy’s and an Arby’s, and next door to a Taco Bell, in Glenwood Springs. He still remains rail-thin since starting his new job as assistant copy editor at the Post Independent.Dan Thomas is a former Summit Daily News arts and entertainment editor who works directly across the street from a Wendy’s and an Arby’s, and next door to a Taco Bell, in Glenwood Springs. He still remains rail-thin since starting his new job as assistant copy editor at the Post Independent.


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