What is your favorite Super Bowl memory? | PostIndependent.com

What is your favorite Super Bowl memory?

Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Favorite Super Bowl memory? It has to be my wife’s seven-bean Super Bowl Soup. Before that, it was always pizza, soda, chips and dip … all the guys stuffing our faces while absorbing every prescient moment of the four-hour pregame analysis.

Once Super Bowl Soup entered the picture, suddenly so did the ladies … and continual conversation, which abruptly stopped … when the commercial breaks began??

Seriously, no question it was John Elway’s “helicopter” dive for a first down sparking the Broncos to their first Super Bowl win over the Packers, followed closely by Green Bay “letting” the Broncos score so they could get the ball back quickly near the end of XXXII.

My fondest Super Bowl memory is pretty predictable for most people, but it was Super Bowl XXXII.

I came home from college to watch it with my dad. We were so careful to not jinx the Broncos in any way after learning from four devastating Super Bowl defeats. We were both so into the game that we hardly ate any food and refused to partake in any adult beverages. We wanted to remember every moment of the game.

I think we both had goose bumps when Elway did the helicopter dive towards the goal line and refused to get too excited when John Mobley knocked down the last pass. Only after Elway kneeled down did we let loose and celebrate.

Being in college, I then decided to try to start a riot in downtown Rifle. I ran down Railroad Avenue with my shirt off, screaming, and, oddly, all alone.

It didn’t matter, though, as the Broncos were finally world champions and we enjoyed it as a family. Finally, my dad and I toasted a beer to the team.

Super Bowl II is my favorite memory, because I was there! Packers 33, Raiders 14, so it was a great game for Packer fans.

The most memorable play was Herb Adderley’s 62-yard interception return in the fourth quarter to ice the game. He is one of my all-time favorite defensive backs.

The game itself is still much the same, but today’s ticket prices reflect the tremendous “fan appeal.” The $700 and $900 Super Bowl XLII tickets are going for an “average” of $4,300, with prices for boxes and “packages” ranging from $19,500 on up to $175,000 for a corporate box on the 45-yard line.

My ticket for Super Bowl II cost me $12 for a great seat location.

Forty two: That’s the number of years the Vince Lombardi trophy has been lifted.

For me, I obviously haven’t witnessed all 42 live but I have seen 15 that I can remember. Two memories come to mind.

First was Super Bowl XXXII featuring the Denver Broncos against the defending-champion Green Bay Packers. It was my family’s first year living in Rifle and I decided to try and have a Super Bowl party.

Well, no one really showed up, it was me and my parents but I made banners and signs all out of colored pencils, and we even made our own cheese dip. That was a lot of fun.

The other memory I had was just this last year. For Super Bowl XLI, it was my first Super Bowl I didn’t watch at home. I was living in Fort Collins and we had about 10 people come over, hooked up my friend’s 52-inch LCD television and watched the Super Bowl in high definition while eating three large pizzas. It was great.

What holds for this year, I guess I’ll have to wait and see.

J.T. (Justin Timberlake) and Janet (Jackson).

Listening to the Chicago Bears’ Super Bowl Shuffle over and over on the record player, trying to memorize every word.

None. I’m a Cleveland Browns fan.

I was 4 or 5 years old and bright-orange Bronco bulbs decorated our Christmas tree that year (Mom was a fanatic). I don’t remember much, but the beloved Broncs were getting beat by the Niners while I gorged on all the awesome food and learned some new words, as Mom leaped from the sofa every so often, shouting, “Sack ’em! Sack that !@#**!!” Indeed, they were wise and effective words that I myself have come to use with great skill and fluency.

When Cuba Gooding Jr. makes that amazing touchdown and wins the game for the Cardinals. Oh, wait, that wasn’t the Super Bowl, and it also wasn’t real.

Probably watching former PI publisher Valerie Smith bowl at our company office party. Oh, you mean that football thing; I was talking about the lanes in New Castle.

We all have opinions about Pat Bowlen, owner of the Denver Broncos. To me, those fur coats on the sideline were a bit tacky. But there is no better moment for me as a Bronco fan than watching Bowlen hand the Lombardi Trophy to John Elway after the Broncos won the team’s first Super Bowl against the Green Bay Packers ” a game everyone told me the Broncos were going to lose ” and said four simple words: “This one’s for John.”

I and a few of the other grizzled men I was watching the game with shed a few tears. It’s moments like that make little boys want to throw a football with their dads.

Hands down, it was watching Steve Young and the San Francisco 49ers annihilate the San Diego Chargers 49-26 in Super Bowl XXIX.

After two years of losing to the wretched Cowboys in NFC championship games, it was oh so cathartic to see Young and the Niners run up the score in Miami, and to see the best left-handed quarterback in NFL history break a record with six touchdown passes.

Pop quiz, Broncos fans: Whose record did he beat? Hint: 55-10!!!


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