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Your Letters

Post Independent
Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Although James Kellogg’s Sept. 6 column reads more like a plea for help than any type of expose, it still puts forth a slew of dubious claims and outright misstatements.

The U.S. Constitution guarantees to all its citizens a republican form of government. Carbondale, Aspen and other locations that consider such horrors as smart growth and sustainability in their planning – even those that are part of global networks that recognize the shared nature of our small planet – are acting via their elected bodies.

Thus it is false to state, as does Mr. Kellogg, that “The entire globalist agenda is enacted without voter approval.”

Mr. Kellogg is free to believe that “energy efficiency audits of municipal buildings, streetlight retrofits, public transit expansion, and renewable energy projects” are part of a secret United Nations globalist agenda. He might brush up on some basic facts, however, before he embarrasses himself again in another column.

Pete Kolbenschlag

Paonia

Local, sustainable, food production is an environmentally and economically beneficial effort finally gaining the support it deserves.

This wonderful grassroots movement invites simple participation like strolling a farmers market, or in-depth involvement like picking peaches in Palisade.

However, for sustainable agriculture to continually grow and eventually replace chemical/fossil fuel-based agro-business, we must first rebuild the soil’s organic matter and nutritional value on a large scale, while eliminating the need for chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Now dig this: Our largest source of organic matter, nitrogen and many other essentials is in our discards.

Recently, a USDA grant funded the “Waste Composition Analyses,” showing that about 60 percent of the local waste received at Pitkin, Eagle and Garfield county landfills consists of compostable organics.

The No. 1 recommendation of this $100,000 study is implementing a large scale diversion of organics from the waste stream – with a special emphasis on food waste – by composting.

With all this great momentum going towards sustainability and composting, can anyone explain why the South Canyon Landfill chooses instead to burn and bury these valuable resources, which can be recovered easily for beneficial use?

I’ve heard they compress and burn wood discards to dry nitrogen-rich waste water for landfilling – destroying two valuable resources while creating emissions, potential ground water contamination and methane production. This is a foul energy independence plan, and for more info on why Waste-to-Energy is expensive and dirty, check out July’s Bio-Cycle (www.jgpress.com/archives/_free/002380.html).

Composting isn’t about waste elimination. It’s about the recovery of valuable resources necessary for the very foundation and feedstock of life. Unfortunately, because some folks aren’t interested in the beneficial use of these resources, it’s up to us as consumers to make better decisions.

Before you hire a hauler to collect yard wastes, wood wastes, paper wastes, food wastes or any other organics, and before you hire a septic pumping truck or porta-potty service, call and ask them where they take their organic wastes and seepage. There are options in this region for having these resources either recovered or destroyed. The choice is yours.

David Reindel

Carbondale


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