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Your Letters

Post Independent
Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

James Kellogg’s opinion column outlining a United Nations-inspired “sustainable plot” to subvert Americans’ prosperity, liberty and independence would be funny if it weren’t so sadly misguided.

Kellogg’s one-world government conspiracy theory reminds me of the Air Force general in the 1964 movie “Dr. Strangelove,” who was more concerned that hard-core commies were trying to introduce foreign substances into “our precious bodily fluids” than by the imminent prospect of nuclear war.

Stanley Kubrick’s darkly satirical movie is entertaining as far as paranoid fantasy goes, but let’s not confuse that with reality.

All this one-world government nonsense is simply a diversion, a straw-man threat concocted to persuade us that we can no longer afford to protect our own health and safety. Environmental protection is deemed to be a job-killing threat to “our sovereign health,” while the pursuit of clean air and water and healthy communities is somehow equated with creeping socialism.

Mr. Kellogg and I apparently agree upon at least one thing: Americans need to wake up and pay attention to what’s going on.

Yes, we need to invest our resources frugally. But there is no need to choose between a healthy, sustainable environment and a strong economy. Indeed, our local tourism and resort economy depends almost entirely upon conserving and wisely managing the abundant natural resources that surround us.

Fortunately, we’ve already begun to reduce our dependence on imported oil and to shift towards cleaner, renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal. Thousands of jobs have been created here in Colorado, where the Metro Denver Economic Development Corp. estimates that the clean-energy technology industry has now grown to 1,600 companies employing over 19,000 workers.

Yes, environmental protection costs money, but unlike money spent on imported oil, it is money that goes back into our own local economies to create jobs and prosperity for our friends and neighbors. And yes, the resulting clean air, water and energy independence are something that we’re all free to equally enjoy.

Russ Arensman

Glenwood Springs

I am deeply concerned about the state of our schools and the severe impact that cutting quality education will have on the future of our communities. After $5.2 million in budget cuts over the last three years, schools are already facing the challenges of doing more with less.

We need to vote yes for the mill levy. For an average of just $9.50 a month, we can support our community by keeping our schools strong. When the mill levy passes, class sizes will remain smaller (15-24), we’ll retain our most experienced teachers, continue to provide quality materials, and ensure that students are prepared for life after graduation.

Most of us can’t imagine surviving an hour with more than a few 5-year-olds. Imagine spending the day (all day!) with over 30, add to that the task of teaching them how to read and write. Now picture yourself spending the day trying to educate over 30 14-year-olds. Yikes!

Our teachers already put in more than 100 percent. If we fail to pass this initiative, our standout teachers will have the option to stay and work for less money in a community that doesn’t support them, or move to a district that offers competitive salaries and votes for education. We all have a stake in getting the mill levy passed. Please vote yes for Question 3E on Nov. 1.

Wendy Kennedy

Carbondale


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