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Your Letters

Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

I want to bring readers’ attention to an ongoing investigation of deadly levels of hydrogen sulfide gas on Noble Energy gas sites reported by KREX TV in Grand Junction. Their investigation begins with the tragic story of Jose Lara, who was an employee of Rain for Rent. He powerwashed wastewater tanks for various gas drillers that contained toxic chemicals that he was not made aware of by his employer. Lara wore no respirator or protective gear. He died of pancreatic and liver cancer.

The KREX story goes on to say that Ryan Beaver monitored for hydrogen sulfide in the same kind of tanks while an employee of On Site Safety, contracted by Noble Energy. According to KREX reporter John Dzenitis, Beaver’s monitoring device recorded H2S levels exceeding 2,000 ppm on a Nobel Energy gas site in De Beque. Yes, 2,000 parts per million. Ryan Beaver wore a gas mask during monitoring.

The TV presentation showed Beaver’s log book from May through August of 2010 with the deadly entries. The website goes on to say; “The dangerous levels of H2S Beaver recorded for four months were never reported [by Noble Energy] to the county or state, the COGCC says.”

The article also states that the COGCC has dissuaded the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment from monitoring for H2S at Colorado gas sites since 1997. They claimed there were no hydrogen sulfide issues in Colorado.

Please go to krextv.com and type in “hydrogen sulfide” in the search area to bring up “Deadly Gas Industry Cover Up.” KREX will soon be presenting another segment of this ongoing story.

Demand full disclosure from Nobel Energy and the COGCC.

Workers in the industry and residents living in these areas must be protected.

Beth Pearce

Rifle

A controversy is brewing over cutbacks in the Postal Service due to a deficit in their budget. Consider that we are subsidizing Amtrak to the tune of $1.5 billion per budget year. Yet the Post Office is the service being cut.

Then consider the number of people who ride Amtrak, the number of people who use the U.S. Postal Service and now add in the number of people employed by each entity.

The president talks up the need for jobs, but he and Congress ignore those presently employed in their attempt to cut the deficit. Cutting the Postal Service is just wrong for a lot of reasons.

Jack E. Blankenship

Battlement Mesa

The New York Times reported on Aug. 21 of the tragic deaths of four football players in Linwood, N.J., when their car rolled over three times on the Garden State Parkway. Only some of the occupants were wearing seat belts, and those reported to football practice the next day.

The driver was 17 and had seven passengers. New Jersey law not only requires using seat belts, but generally bars drivers under 18 from carrying more than one passenger unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.

In Colorado, the law states that licensed drivers under 18 cannot drive with more than one passenger under 21 until after holding their license for than one year (siblings and medical emergencies excepted).

I wish Colorado law could be tightened to forbid any teenager from driving with another passenger, except a parent or guardian, until their 18th birthday or till they have had their license for two years.

Every driver of every age should practice this mantra: I will not start this vehicle until every occupant has his or her seat belt fastened. Perhaps if children learn this ritual when young they will follow it when they become drivers.

Rod Savoye

Glenwood Springs


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