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Your Letters

Post Independent
Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Here’s a little advice for the tempest brewing in the City Market parking lots from a former “booter” and bootee. I used to boot cars at the Durant Mall in Aspen, next to City Market. Despite scores of “No Parking” signs, I was compelled to boot a few cars per week, which too often led to a confrontational situation with an irate patron.

Instead of booting first-time offenders, I applied a hard-to-remove sticker directly in the middle of windshield. I kept a list, and a second offense earned the scofflaw two stickers on their windshield.

The third time was a charm and they got the boot with a $50 removal fee.

Of course the patrons still complained about the stubbornly sticky stickers, and I would point out that City Market sold a 98-cent pack of double-edged razor blades to facilitate removal.

Following my advice would be doubly beneficial for the stores. First, they wouldn’t alienate customers with that ridiculous $200 extortion for boot removal. Plus they could save a good chunk of change by giving an employee in charge of rounding up carts a notebook, pen and watch. The shopping center owners might think the booting company is a good idea, but those disgruntled drivers might take their business down the road to Wally World, where they don’t employ such asinine customer relations.

Bruno Kirchenwitz

Rifle

I support and will vote for John Martin and Mike Samson for Garfield County commissioners. My reason is very simple, they are extremely competent managers of the county finances, and in this very tough economic climate you look around the country and the devastation that’s caused when you spend too much.

According to the National Association of Counties, out of 2,800 counties in all of the United States, Garfield County ranks No. 32 in the best managed counties. They achieved this honor by providing all the necessary services and operating within the budget that’s based on the amount of taxes taken in. In other words don’t spend more than you take in.

When tax money received from the oil and gas industry was rolling in, they very prudently built up a nice reserve. Now that income has slowed down or stopped because the federal government has stopped issuing permits to drill. The interest earned on that reserve has provided a nice cushion to build some projects without asking for more taxes, like the school board did.

A year ago when all the departments turned in their requests for budgets, they were $7 million over what would be coming in, so in two or three meetings with the department heads, they were able to balance the budget and trim the $7 million. If you recall, Sheriff Lou Vallario returned $5 million that was left over in his budget over a two-year span.

This is the kind of leadership that deserves our vote. They make tough choices when necessary. We should be thankful we have managers and not politicians.

Vote for John Martin and Mike Samson.

Ken Kriz

Glenwood Springs

Just a short response to Christopher Isensee’s letter of Sept. 19 regarding the Summitville Mine.

I cannot speak to Congressman Tipton’s bill, as I have not read it. However, I was working for the U.S. Forest Service on the Del Norte Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest, when the Summitville disaster occurred. I certainly can agree with the amount of environmental damage that occurred, but I was not there when the remediation was done, so I cannot validate his numbers.

But Mr. Isensee has the facts a little muddled. First of all, the Summitville Mine was located on private land, not public land, therefore the 1872 Mining Act had nothing to do with this mine.

The primary failure of the cyanide heap leach process was poor construction of the pad. The company asked for and received permission to build the pad from the state of Colorado, during the winter, when proper compaction of the heap leach pad was virtually impossible due to frozen and moisture-laden soils.

As to how much they took out and what the company paid or did not pay, I do not know, but the blame for the failure must fall on the people who were regulating the mine and the operator. Both are equally at fault.

Gary Osier

Rifle

A couple of articles in the Post Independent made me wonder if the Colorado Department of Transportation’s right hand knows what its left hand is doing. The first, appearing on Sept. 10, announced that the Grand Avenue Bridge project team (of which CDOT is a member) had selected Alternative 3, under which the current Sixth and Laurel intersection would be replaced with a huge traffic configuration.

Two days later, an article on the damage to the traffic signal system at Sixth and Laurel caused by the 16-foot-high trailer stated that CDOT is planning to replace the present system with mast-arm signal posts and overhead bars in 2013 (costing well over a million dollars).

Since the construction of the Grand Avenue Bridge project is scheduled to start in 2015, this would mean that CDOT will be tearing out the signal system just two years after installing it. Your tax money at work.

It also makes me wonder about the thinking behind the massive cost that CDOT has already paid for the planning, analysis, and public meetings related to the process of developing 11 alternatives. CDOT is selecting the preferred alternative for the Grand Avenue Bridge project, and proceeding at an enormous cost for the environmental assessment and design phases for the project, before determining whether it will even be possible to deal with the traffic congestion during construction, or the probability that a majority of the residents of Glenwood Springs may be dead set against the project as currently conceived.

It’s just another example of CDOT squandering your and my tax money. It’s time for the people of Glenwood Springs to speak up and let CDOT know what they really think.

John Haines

Glenwood Springs

First of all, I would like to thank U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton for upholding not only the immigration law of the United States of America, but also her standing firm on Arizona officers being able to enforce that law, which our current government so seemingly chooses to ignore.

That said, on to the point.

I understand that illegal immigrants migrate to the United States wanting a better life than they have. I too would enjoy a somewhat better life, one I can earn and work for. That does not mean I can sneak through the back door and take it because I want it. That is theft.

I, as an American citizen, will go to jail or prison for this violation of the law that governs not only the state of Colorado, but the U.S. as well. Simply, I wanted something so badly that I made the choice to take what I wanted and ignored the consequences.

We legal U.S. citizens have been educated on the consequences of our actions from birth – what is right, what is wrong and the potential outcome of our actions. And if you break the governing law, you will go to jail.

The illegal immigrant has broken the governing law of the United States by taking what they wanted and ignoring the consequences. It is finally time to hold illegal immigrants responsible for their blatant disregard for our laws. There should be no complaining or whining on their behalf, as this is just the consequence of their breaking the law. I only hope that Colorado can adopt and enforce the same law that Arizona has chosen to, but our government still ignores.

Kenny Ray Straight

Rifle


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