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Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

The only person associated with Haliburton I am glad to see lose his high-paying job is Dick Cheney. That has made me very happy!

The powerful wealth-creating engine of the energy industry is still being allowed to pollute at will. They are allowed to protect, for instance, the identity of the chemicals they put into the ground and air because the information is “proprietary.” Would they conceal this information if all these chemicals were benign? Some still “flare,” which puts ozone creating chemicals in the air.

But the jobs are most respected, still, because they feed families, ignoring the risk of climate change which in the future will make us unable to feed families. Could there be a price to pay?

Some years ago, fishermen of the East Coast and elsewhere were forced to limit their catches and seasons to allow the fisheries to replenish. Their jobs had to become less “high paying” to sustain their industry. You can imagine the resistance to being told what to do with your several hundred thousand dollar fishing boat, and how to do a job you, your father and grandfather had done all their lives.

Somehow energy economics also has to adjust to a sustainable reality.

” … Just as AIG sold insurance derivatives at prices that did not reflect real costs and the real risks of massive defaults, oil {and gas} companies, coal companies and electric utilities today are selling energy products at prices hat do not reflect the real costs to the environment and real risks of disruptive climate change.” – Thomas Friedman NY Times, April1.

Environmental deregulation subsidizes our oil and gas prices.

Please look at the definition of an externality, as an economic term. It is a cost or benefit arising from an economic activity which affects somebody other than the people engaged in the economic activity and not reflected fully in prices.

This is an acknowledged economic reality. We need to be aware enough to understand the “externalalities” the extraction industry imposes on us, those alongside the coveted “high-paying jobs.”

Barbara Coddington

Glenwood Springs

This letter is in response to the person who wrote Alpine Bank employee Abraham Baeza is stuck in Mexico because he got bad legal advice.

Mr. Baeza is not stuck in Mexico because of bad legal advice. Mr. Baeza is stuck in Mexico because he overstayed a tourist visa, and then lied about it on an immigration form.

Robert Lewis

Glenwood Springs

While it was hard to quickly get one’s mind around the banking crisis, now a number of things are becoming clear to many of us.

One is that “too big to fail” is too big, period. No private corporations should be allowed to become too big to fail. That is giving it a blank check to avoid the consequences of its actions by blackmailing the rest of us.

Another is the recent behavior of top management of these huge banks in making tremendous short-term profits from irresponsible lending and leaving the rest of us with the bill was actually criminally fraudulent.

Our conclusion is that there is now only one solution and that is for us (our government) to temporarily nationalize the banks, clean them up and then sell them off piecemeal as smaller banks. At the same time, new regulations should make it impossible for any bank or other private corporation to become “too big to fail.”

I cannot think of anything more important for us to spend our time on right now. As public understanding of all this increases, public outrage and rebelliousness is going to reach dangerous proportions. I already know young people who are tearing up their credit card bills.

An action group has already been formed. And demonstrations across the country are planned for April 11. For more information, go to http://www.anewwayforward.org.

Mary Boland

Carbondale


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