Your Letters | PostIndependent.com

Your Letters

Post Independent
Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Originally addressed Dear Gay,

I am affiliated with the local Tea Party movement. I have examined my motives, as you suggested in your recent letter, and I’m convinced they’re pure and well-placed. I have become involved with the Tea Party Patriots of the Roaring Fork Valley for one reason: I have children, and I want them to enjoy the same opportunities and freedoms that I have enjoyed as an adult in this country. I am extremely concerned about the direction our national government is headed. We are about to tax and spend ourselves into oblivion. Even Europe and the communists in China are begging us to stop spending money.

Your disingenuous tone and incredibly uncontroversial examples of government services barely merit a response. I think we can all agree that our taxes should be used for things like roads, defense, fire and police protection – things that we as individuals cannot practically do for ourselves. These vital services could even be improved if the government were more efficient and not spending money on things that people can or should do for themselves. It’s not that I don’t want to pay any taxes, I just don’t want my tax dollars wasted.

For all those who support the current administration’s ambitious tax and spend plans, I respectfully suggest that you should examine its motives. Consider Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel’s sentiments regarding the economic crisis, when he said, “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. And what I mean by that is an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before.”

You’re correct on one point, Gay: This is an important matter, and we should all let our representatives know how we want them to vote concerning matters of taxation and spending.

Dendy Heisel

Glenwood Springs

Last week someone mentioned that they had read some recent letters that I requested be printed in local papers. They said that they agreed with what I wrote but that I should be careful, implying, I think, that I should be careful of how the “government” will view my words. I dismissed this, thinking, “What has the government to fear from an old guy’s words printed in some local papers? Nothing, I concluded at that time.

Then, this week a friend uttered a similar caution and I responded lightly to the effect that I expect the government to come take me away. I don’t expect anything of the sort but it did make me reflect on the fact that I am hearing from people in private conversations more and more dissatisfaction with the performance of the U.S. government but not hearing them speak out to voice this dissatisfaction except in private conversations.

Could a reluctance to speak out really be out of some level of fear of the government? Maybe they hope that others will speak out for them so that they can stay unnoticed safely in the background. If you find that you have something you would like to say but are, either out of timidity or fear, reluctant to do so, you should be screaming it out in any way you can. Too many times in history good people have stood by and said nothing with disastrous results. Don’t be afraid of your government, make your government fear that you will throw them out of office if they do not support your rights or uphold the US Constitution as intended by our founders.

“Government big enough to supply everything you need is big enough to take everything you have. … The course of history shows that as a government grows, liberty decreases.”

– Thomas Jefferson

Speak up for what you believe in!

Art Hougland

Glenwood Springs


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