Hoping our leadership can learn from history | PostIndependent.com

Hoping our leadership can learn from history

Out on a LimbRoss L. TalbottGlenwood Springs, CO Colorado

Back in school, I really despised the study of history. When you are young you are living in the “now,” and even the future seems far away.Over the years I came to realize what an incredibly important thing our history is. Our history really has defined who we are. Those who were perceptive enough to realize that fact have used distorted and dishonest history to attempt to reshape our culture into their vision. They have been successful to a frightening extent.My last trip to Israel was a real eye-opener. Jerusalem has thousands of years of history and has been conquered 39 times.By comparison, American culture is only a few hundred years old. If we find an old mine rail spike, we think we are touching history. Here in Western Colorado, we are only a couple of generations away from the original settlers.The only exception, of course, is the Native American. Those people did not build great monuments, so their history is vague.An honest examination of our founding fathers’ writings reveals that they were committed Christians (with few exceptions), their driving passion was to found colonies where the guiding principles were freedom and obedience to the God of creation.This idealism produced a nation that was strong and independent. It generated a people that were innovative, industrious and mutually supportive. Education was a priority, and responsibility and independence were expected.We have gradually morphed into a people who think they are entitled to public (government) support.For instance, child labor laws, laws which were intended to protect children, have produced a generation of punks who don’t know how to work. They think they are entitled to a car, a cell phone and an unearned allowance. Any employer will testify that there is an incredible difference in responsibility and work ethic between a ranch-raised kid and a city kid.We have a government that penalizes success with taxation and regulation. Then it rewards failure with subsidies, housing assistance, free education and medical care. This process as operated only increases dependency and expectations. The real reward for failure should be the opportunity to try again. Failure can be a great educational experience and not defeat. The fifth commandment says to rest on the seventh day, but what is often overlooked is that it says, “six days thou shalt labor … ” That is not, may or can if you want to, but “shall labor.” Maybe reviving the CCC and the WPA would be a better answer.The incredible percent of population in prison facilities should be a clue that our justice system is not restorative. Inmates need to learn to be productive rather than parasitic.The fact that more than 50 percent of the workforce is in government jobs might also suggest that we are way out of balance.On a recent program, Glen Beck stated, “You don’t make the poor rich by making the rich poor.” But that seems to be the political mantra of the left.If our leadership is unable to learn from history, we are surely destined to repeat it.Doesn’t it make you sick that a gunman can line a bunch of students up against the wall and execute them? If we are attacked as a nation, are those the kind of people you want fighting for your freedom? A Jewish Holocaust survivor was the only one willing to give his life to save the others.Six thousand years from now, will history look back and count how many times America was conquered? Will we be the first Americans to lose our nation to a conquering force? Are you a parasite or a patriot? Ross L. Talbott lives in New Castle.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.