DOW priorities right, PR lacking | PostIndependent.com
YOUR AD HERE »

DOW priorities right, PR lacking

Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.



Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.



Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.

Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.

Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.

Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.

Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.

Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.

Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.

Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.

Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.Basalt-area residents have been learning tough lessons lately about where the priorities of the Colorado Division of Wildlife lie.

In keeping with its name, the DOW is putting wildlife first in its management of the Basalt State Wildlife Area. That means people are being put second – not a comfortable position for a species that has long enjoyed dominion over the animal kingdom.

However, a little more effort by the DOW to educate and work with the public could help ease tensions arising out of its entirely appropriate efforts to look after wildlife interests in the state.

Over the last several years, the DOW has made moves that include banning dogs and bicyclists from the wildlife refuge’s trails, taking water once leased to the town of Basalt and using it instead to improve deer grazing habitat, fencing some refuge boundaries, and pursuing clearcut logging to improve forage for deer.

Residents have objected to some of these measures as being overkill and unnecessary, and the town of Basalt was angered by the abrupt end of the water lease. But the measures appear warranted. Dogs and bikes clearly disturb wildlife. And if the DOW needs its own water to improve habitat, so be it.

Meanwhile, logging can be a tool to improve habitat as well. It’s just a matter of how much logging is necessary.

Where the DOW appears to be coming up a little short is in fully explaining its goals to residents and the town, and giving adequate advance notification. This could help to defuse opposition to certain moves by the agency. In other cases, such as the logging plan, listening with an open mind to residents’ concerns might prompt the DOW to seek out a less-aggressive plan that still adequately meets its needs.

Still, the DOW is right to refuse to compromise its primary mission of serving as caretaker of Colorado’s wildlife. When clear choices are needed, it appears ready to have the courage to make them, as when area wildlife manager Pat Tucker imposed the bike ban and DOW director Russ George of Rifle upheld the ban following appeals by bikers.

If wildlife refuges can provide side benefits to humans, such as open space preservation and even some human visitation, great. But they should be refuges, first and foremost.

Let’s keep in mind that in serving Colorado’s wildlife, the DOW serves Colorado’s citizens, who so treasure the abundance and diversity of this state’s game, fish and other animals.


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Glenwood Springs and Garfield County make the Post Independent’s work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User